Sustained high influenza vaccination rates and decreased safety concerns among pregnant women during the 2010–2011 influenza season

Vaccine
Volume 31, Issue 2, Pages 279-438 (2 January 2013)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0264410X

Sustained high influenza vaccination rates and decreased safety concerns among pregnant women during the 2010–2011 influenza season
Original Research Article
Pages 362-366
M. Drees, B. Tambourelli, A. Denstman, W. Zhang, R. Zent, P. McGraw, D.B. Ehrenthal

Abstract
Objective
Intense efforts to vaccinate pregnant women against 2009 H1N1 influenza resulted in much higher vaccine uptake than previously reported. We surveyed postpartum women to determine whether high vaccination rates were sustained during the 2010–11 influenza season.

Methods
We performed cross-sectional surveys of postpartum women delivering at our institution during February–April 2010 and February–March 2011. The surveys ascertained maternal characteristics, history of influenza vaccination, and reasons for lack of vaccination.

Results
During the 2010–11 season, 165 (55%) of 300 women surveyed reported receiving influenza vaccination, compared to 191 of 307 (62%) during 2009–10 (p = 0.08). Vaccination by an obstetrical provider was common, but decreased compared to 2009–10 (60% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). While most women (76%) in 2010–11 reported that their provider recommended influenza vaccination, significantly more reported lack of discussion about vaccination (24% vs. 11%, p < 0.01) compared to 2009–10. Vaccine safety concerns were cited by most (66%) women declining vaccination during 2009–10 but only 27% of women who declined in 2010–11.

Conclusion
The vaccination rate among pregnant women at our institution was relatively sustained, although fewer providers appear to be discussing influenza vaccination in pregnancy. Concern about vaccine safety, the primary barrier during 2009–10, was much less prominent.