From Google Scholar+ [to 14 Sep 2013]

From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

Academic Pediatrics
Volume 13, Issue 5, September–October 2013,

A Randomized Trial to Increase Acceptance of Childhood Vaccines by Vaccine-Hesitant Parents: A Pilot Study
S. Elizabeth Williams, MDa, Russell L. Rothman, MD, MPPb, Paul A. Offit, MDd, William Schaffner, MDc, Molly Sullivana, Kathryn M. Edwards, MDa
Pages 475–480
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1876285913000661
Abstract
Objective
A cluster randomized trial was performed to evaluate an educational intervention to improve parental attitudes and vaccine uptake in vaccine-hesitant parents.
Methods
Two primary care sites were randomized to provide families with either usual care or an intervention (video and written information) for vaccine-hesitant parents. Eligible parents included those presenting for their child’s 2-week well-child visit with performance on the Parent Attitudes about Childhood Vaccines (PACV) survey suggesting vaccine hesitancy (score ≥25). Enrollees completed PACV surveys at the 2-month well-child visit and vaccination status at 12 weeks of age was assessed. The primary outcome was the difference in PACV scores obtained at enrollment and 2 months between the 2 groups. The proportion of on-time vaccination was also compared at 12 weeks.
Results
A total of 454 parents were approached, and 369 (81.3%) participated; 132 had PACV scores of ≥25 and were enrolled, 67 in the control group (mean PACV score 37) and 55 in the intervention group (mean PACV score 40). Two-month PACV surveys were completed by 108 (∼90%) of enrollees. Parents in the intervention group had a significant decrease in PACV score at 2 months compared to control (median difference 6.7, P = .049); this remained significant after adjustment for baseline PACV score, race/ethnicity, and income (P = .044). There was no difference in the on-time receipt of vaccines between groups at 12 weeks.
Conclusions
A brief educational intervention for vaccine-hesitant parents was associated with a modest but significant increase in measured parental attitudes toward vaccines.

A Mixed Methods Study of Parental Vaccine Decision Making and Parent–Provider Trust
Jason M. Glanz, PhDa, Nicole M. Wagner, MPHa, Komal J. Narwaney, PhDa, Jo Ann Shoup, MS, MSWa, David L. McClure, PhDb, Emily V. McCormick, MPHc, Matthew F. Daley, MDa
a Kaiser Permanente Colorado—Institute for Health Research, Denver, Colo
b Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wis
c Denver Public Health Department, Denver, Colo
Pages 481–48
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1876285913001563
Abstract
Objective
To describe parental vaccine decision making behaviors and characterize trust in physician advice among parents with varying childhood vaccination behaviors.
Methods
Between 2008 and 2011, a mixed methods study was conducted with parents of children aged <4 years who were members of Kaiser Permanente Colorado health plan. Seven focus groups were conducted with vaccine-hesitant parents. On the basis of findings from the focus groups, a survey was developed, pilot tested, and mailed to a stratified sample of 854 parents who accepted (n = 500), delayed (n = 227), or refused (n = 127) vaccinations for one of their children. Survey results were analyzed by chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression.
Results
Several themes emerged from the focus groups, including: 1) the vaccine decision-making process begins prenatally, 2) vaccine decision making is an evolving process, and 3) there is overall trust in the pediatrician but a lack of trust in the information they provided about vaccines. The survey response rate was 52% (n = 443). Parents who refused or delayed vaccines were 2 times more likely to report that they began thinking about vaccines before their child was born and 8 times more likely to report that they constantly reevaluate their vaccine decisions than parents who accepted all vaccines. Although parents tended to report trusting their pediatrician’s advice on nutrition, behavior, and the physical examination, they did not believe their pediatrician provided “balanced” information on both the benefits and risks of vaccination.
Conclusions
These results have implications for future interventions to address parental vaccination concerns. Such interventions may be more effective if they are applied early (during pregnancy) and often (pregnancy through infancy), and cover both the risks and benefits of vaccination.