World AIDS Day 2013 – 1 December 2013

World AIDS Day 2013 – 1 December 2013

WHO: New HIV recommendations for adolescents
25 November 2013 — More than 2 million adolescents between the ages of 10 and 19 years are living with HIV, and many do not receive the care and support that they need to stay in good health and prevent transmission. In addition, millions more adolescents are at risk of infection. The failure to support effective and acceptable HIV services for adolescents has resulted in a 50% increase in reported AIDS-related deaths in this group compared with the 30% decline seen in the general population from 2005 to 2012.
New WHO recommendations released in the run-up to World AIDS Day 2013 are the first to address the specific needs of adolescents, both for those living with HIV and those who are at risk of infection.
:: Press release: Adolescents falling through gaps in HIV services
:: Guidance for HIV testing, counselling and care
:: Policy brief

UNICEF: More than 850,000 infants saved from HIV since 2005, but alarming trends seen among adolescents
NEW YORK, 29 November 2013 – A new report released today by UNICEF shows great progress has been made to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV, with more than 850,000 new childhood infections averted between 2005 and 2012 in low- and middle-income countries…

NIH Statement on World AIDS Day 2013 — December 1, 2013
Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Jack Whitescarver, Ph.D., Director, NIH Office of AIDS Research; Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., NIH Director
http://www.nih.gov/news/health/nov2013/niaid-27.htm
Excerpt
In the 25 years that have passed since the first annual commemoration of World AIDS Day, extraordinary scientific progress has been made in the fight against HIV/AIDS. That progress has turned an HIV diagnosis from an almost-certain death sentence to what is now for many, a manageable medical condition and nearly normal lifespan. We have come far, yet not far enough.

In 2012, more than 2 million new HIV infections and 1.6 million AIDS-related deaths occurred globally. Although these numbers represent a decline from previous years, they also reflect a grim reality: far too many people become HIV-infected and die from the effects of the disease. On World AIDS Day, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) reaffirms its commitment to finding improved HIV treatments and tools for preventing infection (including a vaccine), addressing the conditions and diseases associated with long-term HIV infection, and, ultimately, finding a cure…

…A cornerstone of our HIV prevention efforts continues to be the search for a safe and effective vaccine. The pathway to an effective HIV vaccine has been challenging and marked by disappointments; however, basic research advances this year are charting the course for a new generation of investigational HIV vaccines. Through the work of NIH scientists and grantees, we have gained insights into how HIV and a strong antibody response to the virus co-evolve in an infected person and improved our understanding of how B-cells create potentially protective immune system responses. Further, NIH-funded researchers have developed a new tool for identifying broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV that could help speed vaccine research and illuminated in exquisite detail the protein largely responsible for enabling HIV to enter human immune cells and cause infection.

Additionally, ongoing analyses of the landmark RV 144 HIV vaccine trial conducted in Thailand are providing important information about human immune responses and other factors that may explain why the investigational vaccine regimen reduced the risk of HIV acquisition by 31 percent. Large-scale investigational clinical trials to build on the RV 144 results are being planned for South Africa and Thailand….

IAVI: World AIDS Day – December 1, 2013: Honoring Their Memories. Finding a Vaccine.
November 25, 2013
Excerpt
On this World AIDS Day, the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) pays tribute to the tens of millions of people who have lost their lives by reaffirming our commitment to finding a vaccine that will help end the AIDS pandemic.
“There has been tremendous success in treating millions with HIV over the past three decades,” said IAVI President and Chief Executive Officer Margie McGlynn, “but a great deal of continued commitment, innovation and persistence will be needed to realize the vision of a world without AIDS…

http://www.iavi.org/Information-Center/Press-Releases/Pages/World-AIDS-Day-2013-Honoring-Their-Memories-Finding-a-Vaccine.aspx