The Lancet – Series: Violence against women and girls

The Lancet
Apr 25, 2015 Volume 385 Number 9978 p1591-1696 e38-e44
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/issue/current
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Comment
Research priorities to address violence against women and girls
Marleen Temmerman
Published Online: 20 November 2014
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61840-7
Violence against women and girls is increasingly visible on the global health and development agenda—both as a matter of social justice and equality for women and as a public health priority. After many years of dedicated efforts, more is known about the epidemiology of some forms of violence against women, and knowledge is increasing about what works to prevent and respond to such violence. However, as this Lancet Series on violence against women and girls1–5 highlights, in terms of research and evidence this is still an emerging field.

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Series
Prevention of violence against women and girls: lessons from practice
Lori Michau, MA, Jessica Horn, MSc, Amy Bank, BA, Mallika Dutt, JD, Cathy Zimmerman, PhD
Published Online: 20 November 2014
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61797-9
Summary
This Series paper describes programming to prevent violence against women and girls, and emphasises the importance of systematic, sustained programming across the social ecology (ie, the delicate equilibrium of interacting social, institutional, cultural, and political contexts of people’s lives) to transform gender-power inequalities. Effective prevention policy and programming is founded on five core principles: first, analysis and actions to prevent violence across the social ecology (individual, interpersonal, community, and societal); second, intervention designs based on an intersectional gender-power analysis; third, theory-informed models developed on the basis of evidence; fourth, sustained investment in multisector interventions; and finally, aspirational programming that promotes personal and collective thought, and enables activism on women’s and girls’ rights to violence-free lives. Prevention programming of the future will depend on all of us having a vision of, and a commitment to, gender equality to make violence-free lives for women and girls a reality.

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Series
Addressing violence against women: a call to action
Dr Claudia García-Moreno, MD, Cathy Zimmerman, PhD, Alison Morris-Gehring, PhD, Lori Heise, PhD, Avni Amin, PhD, Naeemah Abrahams, PhD, Oswaldo Montoya, MA, Padma Bhate-eosthali, SW, Nduku Kilonzo, PhD, Prof Charlotte Watts, PhD
Published Online: 20 November 2014
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61830-4
Summary
Violence against women and girls is prevalent worldwide but historically has been overlooked and condoned. Growing international recognition of these violations creates opportunities for elimination, although solutions will not be quick or easy. Governments need to address the political, social, and economic structures that subordinate women, and implement national plans and make budget commitments to invest in actions by multiple sectors to prevent and respond to abuse. Emphasis on prevention is crucial. Community and group interventions involving women and men can shift discriminatory social norms to reduce the risk of violence. Education and empowerment of women are fundamental. Health workers should be trained to identify and support survivors and strategies to address violence should be integrated into services for child health, maternal, sexual, and reproductive health, mental health, HIV, and alcohol or substance abuse. Research to learn how to respond to violence must be strengthened. The elimination of violence against women and girls is central to equitable and sustainable social and economic development and must be prioritised in the agenda for development after 2015.