Emerging Infectious Diseases – Volume 21, Number 6—June 2015

Emerging Infectious Diseases
Volume 21, Number 6—June 2015
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/

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Research
Cost-effectiveness of Chlamydia Vaccination Programs for Young Women
Kwame Owusu-Edusei , Harrell W. Chesson, Thomas L. Gift, Robert C. Brunham, and Gail Bolan
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (K. Owusu-Edusei Jr, H.W. Chesson, T.L. Gift, G. Bolan); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (R.C. Brunham)
Abstract
We explored potential cost-effectiveness of a chlamydia vaccine for young women in the United States by using a compartmental heterosexual transmission model. We tracked health outcomes (acute infections and sequelae measured in quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]) and determined incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) over a 50-year analytic horizon. We assessed vaccination of 14-year-old girls and catch-up vaccination for 15–24-year-old women in the context of an existing chlamydia screening program and assumed 2 prevaccination prevalences of 3.2% by main analysis and 3.7% by additional analysis. Estimated ICERs of vaccinating 14-year-old girls were $35,300/QALY by main analysis and $16,200/QALY by additional analysis compared with only screening. Catch-up vaccination for 15–24-year-old women resulted in estimated ICERs of $53,200/QALY by main analysis and $26,300/QALY by additional analysis. The ICER was most sensitive to prevaccination prevalence for women, followed by cost of vaccination, duration of vaccine-conferred immunity, and vaccine efficacy. Our results suggest that a successful chlamydia vaccine could be cost-effective.

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Ebola Risk Perception in Germany, 2014 PDF Version [PDF – 1.14 MB – 7 pages]
N. Rübsamen et al.
Knowledge about actual risks was poor, creating the potential for inappropriate behavior changes.

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Research
Oral Cholera Vaccine Coverage, Barriers to Vaccination, and Adverse Events following Vaccination, Haiti, 2013 1
Rania A. Tohme , Jeannot François, Kathleen Wannemuehler, Preetha Iyengar, Amber Dismer, Paul Adrien, Terri B. Hyde, Barbara J. Marston, Kashmira Date, Eric D. Mintz, and Mark A. Katz
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (R.A. Tohme, K. Wannemuehler, P. Iyengar, A. Dismer, T.B. Hyde, B.J. Marston, K. Date, E. Mintz); Ministry of Public Health and Population, Port-au-Prince, Haiti (J. Francois, P. Adrien); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Port-au-Prince (M.A. Katz)
Abstract
In 2013, the first government-led oral cholera vaccination (OCV) campaign in Haiti was implemented in Petite Anse and Cerca Carvajal. To evaluate vaccination coverage, barriers to vaccination, and adverse events following vaccination, we conducted a cluster survey. We enrolled 1,121 persons from Petite Anse and 809 persons from Cerca Carvajal, categorized by 3 age groups (1–4, 5–14, >15 years). Two-dose OCV coverage was 62.5% in Petite Anse and 76.8% in Cerca Carvajal. Two-dose coverage was lowest among persons >15 years of age. In Cerca Carvajal, coverage was significantly lower for male than female respondents (69% vs. 85%; p<0.001). No major adverse events were reported. The main reason for nonvaccination was absence during the campaign. Vaccination coverage after this campaign was acceptable and comparable to that resulting from campaigns implemented by nongovernmental organizations. Future campaigns should be tailored to reach adults who are not available during daytime hours.