Media/Policy Watch [to 23 May 2015]

Media/Policy Watch  [to 23 May 2015]
This section is intended to alert readers to substantive news, analysis and opinion from the general media on vaccines, immunization, global; public health and related themes. Media Watch is not intended to be exhaustive, but indicative of themes and issues CVEP is actively tracking. This section will grow from an initial base of newspapers, magazines and blog sources, and is segregated from Journal Watch above which scans the peer-reviewed journal ecology.

We acknowledge the Western/Northern bias in this initial selection of titles and invite suggestions for expanded coverage. We are conservative in our outlook in adding news sources which largely report on primary content we are already covering above. Many electronic media sources have tiered, fee-based subscription models for access. We will provide full-text where content is published without restriction, but most publications require registration and some subscription level.

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Center for Global Development
http://www.cgdev.org/
Accessed 23 May 2015
Global Public Goods for Development: How Much and What For
5/18/15
Nancy Birdsall and Anna Diofasi
| 18 May 2015
Updated May 19, 2015
Global public goods (GPGs) provide benefits to people in both rich and poor countries. They play a crucial role in safeguarding the social, economic, and political progress of the past century. They are fundamental to managing global risks such as climate change, infectious diseases, and financial crises that can harm developing countries disproportionately; and in exploiting opportunities, such as new vaccines, that can benefit them especially. Yet very little is known about how much governments spend on GPGs that matter for developing countries. What scant publicly available information there is we have gathered here for an initial and provisional estimate. Our list is necessarily selective and conservative as none of the major institutions with a global mission – including the World Bank and WHO – report on the funds or programs they dedicate to global public goods, nor have they agreed on any standard definition of GPGs. Our compilation of spending on development-related global public goods in 2012 adds up to about $14 billion (Table 1 and Table 2), equivalent to a little over 10 percent of global spending on official development assistance that year…

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Council on Foreign Relations
http://www.cfr.org/
Accessed 23 May 2015
The Health of Nations: The WHO’s Moment of Truth
by Stewart M. Patrick and Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
The Ebola outbreak in West Africa underscored how vulnerable the world has become to infectious disease—and how vital it is to invest in global health security. Not since the H1N1 pandemic of 2009 had an epidemic garnered so much attention—and inspired so much fear—worldwide. But this window is closing fast. As Ebola has waned in West Africa, so has the political momentum for reforming the World Health Organization (WHO). The World Health Assembly (WHA), which opened Monday in Geneva, offers what may be the last chance to restore the badly tarnished credibility of the WHO and preserve its central role in pandemic preparedness and response…

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The Economist
http://www.economist.com/
Accessed 23 May 2015
Development aid
It’s not what you spend
How to make aid to poor countries work better
May 23rd 2015 The Economist | 23 May 2015
FOR decades rich countries have sought to foster global development with aid. But all too often there is little to show for their spending, now over $135 billion a year and rising. Success depends on political will in recipient countries, says Erik Solheim of the Development Assistance Committee of the OECD, a club of mostly rich countries that includes the biggest donors. And that may well be lacking.
What donors will pay for may not be what recipients deem a priority. So poor countries’ governments say what they must to get cash, and often fail to keep their side of the deal. Aid to build schools may be used to give fat contracts to allies, and the schools left empty. Ambulances bought by donors may rust on the kerb, waiting for spare parts.
Now donors are trying a new approach: handing over aid only if outcomes improve. “Cash on delivery” sees donors and recipients set targets, for example to cut child mortality rates or increase the number of girls who finish school, and agree on how much will be paid if they are met. Conventional approaches still account for the lion’s share of international aid. But several countries, including Britain and Norway, and big private donors, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, are experimenting with cash-on-deliver…

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The Guardian
http://www.guardiannews.com/
Accessed 23 May 2015
Vaccine-free childcare ‘potentially catastrophic’, says industry group
Prospect of day care centres aimed at parents of unvaccinated children who are losing the childcare benefit condemned by Early Childhood Australia
21 May 2015
Moves by parents to open “vaccine-free” and “unvaccinated-friendly” day care centres in response to the federal government’s “no jab, no pay” policy have been described as “potentially catastrophic” by Early Childhood Australia, the peak advocacy body for early childcare.
In April the social services minister, Scott Morrison, announced that by next year, parents who refused to vaccinate their children on the grounds of being “conscientious objectors” would no longer receive the childcare benefit, childcare rebate and the family tax benefit part A end-of-year supplement.
The move has prompted some parents who do not vaccinate their children, and who will not be able to afford childcare as a result, to explore other options.
On social media, one woman has begun advertising the “Vaccine Free Family Day Care” centre on the page of an anti-vaccine group, which she says will open in Dromana, Victoria, start taking enrolments from 22 June, and charge $7 an hour for a minimum of eight hours a day…

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New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/
Accessed 23 May 2015
U.S. Bird Flu Causes Egg Shortage, Emergency Measures
OF LIFE OR DEATH For some companies, having an adequate supply of fertilized eggs can be a matter of life or death. Some vaccine makers, including Merck & Co Inc, maintain their own hen flocks to produce eggs used for incubating
May 23, 2015 – By REUTERS