Assessing determinants of the intention to accept a pertussis cocooning vaccination: A survey among Dutch parents

Vaccine
Volume 34, Issue 39, Pages 4643-4762 (7 September 2016)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0264410X/34/39
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Assessing determinants of the intention to accept a pertussis cocooning vaccination: A survey among Dutch parents
Original Research Article
Pages 4744-4751
Olga Visser, Janneke Kraan, Reinier Akkermans, Robert A.C. Ruiter, Koos van der Velden, Jeannine L.A. Hautvast, Marlies E.J.L. Hulscher
Abstract
Introduction
Pertussis cocooning is one of the strategies aiming to prevent the potential harm of pertussis in infants by vaccinating (among others) their parents. Several countries adopted this strategy, but uptake is a problem. Determinants of parental uptake are important in the design of an effective vaccination programme. Therefore, this study aims to assess parents’ intention to accept a pertussis cocooning vaccination and its determinants.
Methods
A 98 item questionnaire was developed based on a theoretical framework, assessing parents’ intention to accept a pertussis cocooning vaccination and its personal and psychosocial determinants. In addition, beliefs underlying parents’ attitude towards pertussis cocooning vaccination were assessed. Both logistic and linear regression analysis were used to assess univariate and multivariate associations amongst study variables.
Results
Parents returned 282 questionnaires. The majority of the parents (78%) reported a positive intention to accept a pertussis cocooning vaccination. Attitude (OR 6.6, p < .001), anticipated negative affect in response to non acceptance (OR 1.65, p < .001), anticipated negative affect in response to acceptance (OR 0.55, p .040) and decisional uncertainty (OR 0.52, p .002) were significantly associated with intention. General vaccination beliefs (β 0.58, p < .001), moral norm (β 0.22, p < .001), perceived susceptibility of pertussis in children (β 0.10, p.004), and efficacy outcome expectations (β 0.15, p.011) were significant correlates of attitude towards pertussis cocooning vaccination.
Conclusion
The parental intention to accept a pertussis cocooning vaccination in this study is rather high. Targeting the identified determinants of parents’ acceptance in a pertussis cocooning vaccination programme is crucial to secure that intention is translated into actual vaccination uptake.