Milestones :: Perspectives

Milestones :: Perspectives

140th session of the Executive Board
23 January–1 February 2017, Geneva
Main Documents [Selected]
EB140/7
Health emergencies
WHO response in severe, large-scale emergencies

EB140/9
Research and development for potentially epidemic diseases
A blueprint for research and development preparedness and rapid research response

EB140/13
Poliomyelitis

EB140/14
Implementation of the International Health Regulations (2005)
Draft global implementation plan

EB140/15
Implementation of the International Health Regulations (2005)
Public health implications of the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol

EB140/16
Review of the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework

EB140/25
Global vaccine action plan
[Excerpt]
ANNEX
A SUMMARY OF THE 2016 ASSESSMENT REPORT OF THE GLOBAL VACCINE ACTION PLAN BY THE STRATEGIC ADVISORY GROUP OF EXPERTS ON IMMUNIZATION [1]
1. At the midpoint of the Global Vaccine Action Plan, or GVAP (2012–2020), the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (SAGE) remains gravely concerned that progress toward the goals to eradicate polio, eliminate measles and rubella, eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus, and increase equitable access to life saving vaccines is too slow.

2. Despite improvements in individual countries and a strong global rate of new vaccine introduction, global average immunization coverage has increased by only 1% since 2010.

3. In 2015, 68 countries fell short of the target to achieve at least 90% national coverage with the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine. Not only that, 26 countries reported no change in coverage levels and 25 countries reported a net decrease in coverage since 2010.

4. The 16 countries that have made measurable progress since 2010 are to be commended for reaching more people, especially vulnerable and marginalized members of society with immunization. Some of the countries with the highest numbers of unvaccinated people have made the most progress, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia and India, and even though coverage targets have not been achieved in these countries, they are moving forward in the right direction.

5. The 111 countries that entered the decade with high immunization coverage and sustained it through 2015 are already setting their sights on more aggressive goals, additional vaccines, and more equitable coverage. Immunization programmes in these countries can lead the way by increasing access to other public health interventions and providing a platform for the delivery of preventive health services throughout the life course. Vaccine research and development is progressing rapidly, and an expanding pipeline of new vaccines underscores the need to build health systems that can reliably reach new target age groups.

6. The members of the SAGE are steadfast and passionate believers in the power of immunization to give individuals and their families a better start in life and to protect people from a growing array of debilitating illnesses. Immunization is one of the world’s most effective and cost-effective tools against the threat of emerging diseases and has a powerful impact on social and economic development. Recognizing the role that immunization plays in ensuring good health and the role that good health plays in achieving sustainable development, the SAGE has supported the inclusion of immunization indicators to measure progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals.

7. The next four years present unprecedented opportunities for countries to leverage the attention and support that immunization receives and apply it for the benefit of people everywhere. Strident efforts on the part of all countries and immunization stakeholders are required to catch up and achieve GVAP goals by 2020…

[1]http://www.who.int/entity/immunization/global_vaccine_action_plan/SAGE_GVAP_Assessment_ Report_2016_EN.pdf (accessed 10 November 2016).

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