Milestones :: Perspectives

Milestones :: Perspectives

WHO Executive Board announces the names of the 3 nominees for the post of WHO Director-General
25 January 2017
The WHO Executive Board selected by vote the following 3 candidates to be presented to World Health Assembly as nominees for the post of Director-General of WHO.
Five candidates were interviewed by Member States today prior to the vote. The names of the 3 nominees were announced at a public meeting on Wednesday evening, 25 January 2017.
:: Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus
:: Dr David Nabarro
:: Dr Sania Nishtar
All Member States will choose among the 3 nominees by vote at the World Health Assembly in May 2017. The new Director-General will take office on 1 July 2017.

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140th session of the Executive Board
23 January–1 February 2017, Geneva
FOLLOW LIVE: Executive Board
The Executive Board will open at 09:30 on Monday 23 January 2017 and can be watched live via webcast. The discussions will be translated into the six UN official languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish.

During the meeting, WHO’s Executive Board will draw up a short list of 5 candidates on Tuesday 24 January. The following day the Executive Board members will then interview the five candidates and up to three of them to go forward to the World Health Assembly in May 2017.
Live web stream (begins 09:30 CET on Monday 23 January 2017)
Provisional agenda
Main Documents

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Global vaccine action plan
EB140/25
27 Jan 2017 – Webcast of Exec Board discussion
[Video: 1:15] http://www.who.int/mediacentre/events/2017/webstreaming/eb140/en/

Draft resolution proposed by Australia, Brazil and Colombia
Strengthening immunization to achieve the goals of the global vaccine action plan
EB140/CONF./2
[Not adopted; intersessional work to be undertaken to address proposed amendments]

Referenced Supporting Documents
SAGE assessment report 2016
WHO 2016 :: 26 pages
PDF [EN]: http://www.who.int/entity/immunization/global_vaccine_action_plan/SAGE_GVAP_Assessment_Report_2016_EN.pdf?ua=1
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
At the midpoint of the Global Vaccine Action Plan, or GVAP (2012- 2020), the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (SAGE) remains gravely concerned that progress toward the goals to eradicate polio, eliminate measles and rubella, eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus, and increase equitable access to lifesaving vaccines is too slow. Despite improvements in individual countries and a strong global rate of new vaccine introduction, global average immunization coverage has increased by only 1% since 2010.

In 2015, 68 countries fell short of the target to achieve at least 90% national coverage with the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine. Not only that, 26 countries reported no change in coverage levels and 25 countries reported a net decrease in coverage since 2010. The 16 countries that have made measurable progress since 2010 are to be commended for reaching more people, especially vulnerable and marginalized members of society with immunization. Some of the countries with the highest numbers of unvaccinated people have made the most progress, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia and India, and even though coverage targets have not been achieved in these countries, they are moving forward in the right direction.

The 111 countries that entered the decade with high immunization coverage and sustained it through 2015 are already setting their sights on more aggressive goals, additional vaccines, and more equitable coverage. Immunization programmes in these countries can lead the way by increasing access to other public health interventions and providing a platform for the delivery of preventive health services throughout the life course. Vaccine research and development is progressing rapidly, and an expanding pipeline of new vaccines underscores the need to build health systems that can reliably reach new target age groups.

The members of the SAGE are steadfast and passionate believers in the power of immunization to give individuals and their families a better start in life and to protect people from a growing array of debilitating illnesses. Immunization is one of the world’s most effective and cost-effective tools against the threat of emerging diseases and has a powerful impact on social and economic development. Recognizing the role that immunization plays in ensuring good health and the role that good health plays in achieving sustainable development, the SAGE has supported the inclusion of immunization indicators to measure progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals.

The next four years present unprecedented opportunities for countries to leverage the attention and support that immunization receives and apply it for the benefit of people everywhere. Strident efforts on the part of all countries and immunization stakeholders are required to catch up and achieve GVAP goals by 2020.

The SAGE has made nine recommendations which are detailed at the end of this report:
:: Demonstrate stronger leadership and governance of national immunization systems
:: Prioritize immunization system strengthening
:: Secure necessary investments to sustain immunization during polio and Gavi transitions
:: Improve surveillance capacity and data quality and use
:: Enhance accountability mechanisms to monitor implementation of Global and Regional Vaccine Action Plans
:: Achieve elimination targets for maternal and neonatal tetanus, measles, rubella and congenital rubella syndrome
:: Resolve barriers to timely supply of affordable vaccines in humanitarian crisis situations
:: Support vaccine R&D capacity in low- and middle-income countries
:: Accelerate the development and introduction of new vaccines and technologies

GVAP – Monitoring, Evaluation & Accountability – Secretariat report 2016
WHO, 2016 :: 288 pages
Table of Contents
I. Monitoring results: goals, strategic objectives and indicators
1. DISEASE ELIMINATION
2. IMMUNIZATION COVERAGE
3. MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 4 AND INTEGRATION
4. COUNTRY OWNERSHIP
5. VACCINE HESITANCY
6. SURVEILLANCE
7. VACCINES STOCKOUTS AND USE OF VACCINES IN A CONTROLLED-TEMPERATURE CHAIN
8. SUSTAINABLE FINANCING AND SUPPLY FOR IMMUNIZATION
9. VACCINE SAFETY
10. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT