CDC/ACIP [to 4 March 2017]

CDC/ACIP [to 4 March 2017]
http://www.cdc.gov/media/index.html
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/
THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2017
CDC study estimates 20-fold increase in certain types of birth defects in pregnancies with possible Zika infection compared with pre-Zika years
The proportion of Zika-affected pregnancies with birth defects is approximately 20-fold higher compared with the proportion of pregnancies seen in 2013-2014, which is before Zika was introduced into the Americas,…

MMWR Weekly March 3, 2017 / No. 7
[Excerpts]
:: Baseline Prevalence of Birth Defects Associated with Congenital Zika Virus Infection — Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Atlanta, Georgia, 2013–2014
The proportion of Zika-affected pregnancies with birth defects is approximately 20-fold higher compared with the proportion of pregnancies seen in 2013-2014, which is before Zika was introduced into the Americas, according to an article published today in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The types of birth defects—including brain abnormalities and/or microcephaly, neural tube defects and other early brain malformations, eye defects, and other central nervous system (CNS) problems—were seen in about 3 of every 1,000 births in 2013-2014. In 2016, the proportion of infants with these same types of birth defects born to women with Zika virus infection during pregnancy was about 6% or nearly 60 of every 1,000 completed pregnancies with Zika infections.
The researchers analyzed 2013-2014 data from three birth defects surveillance programs in the United States (Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Georgia) to provide the baseline frequency for Zika-related birth defects. To assess the effect of Zika virus infection during pregnancy, the scientists compared that 2013-2014 baseline number with previously published numbers among pregnancies with Zika virus infection from the US Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) from 2016…

:: Response to a Large Polio Outbreak in a Setting of Conflict — Middle East, 2013–2015
As the world advances toward the eradication of polio, outbreaks of wild poliovirus (WPV) in polio-free regions pose a substantial risk to the timeline for global eradication. Countries and regions experiencing active conflict, chronic insecurity, and large-scale displacement of persons are particularly vulnerable to outbreaks because of the disruption of health care and immunization services (1). A polio outbreak occurred in the Middle East, beginning in Syria in 2013 with subsequent spread to Iraq (2). The outbreak occurred 2 years after the onset of the Syrian civil war, resulted in 38 cases, and was the first time WPV was detected in Syria in approximately a decade (3,4). The national governments of eight countries designated the outbreak a public health emergency and collaborated with partners in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) to develop a multiphase outbreak response plan focused on improving the quality of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance* and administering polio vaccines to >27 million children during multiple rounds of supplementary immunization activities (SIAs).† Successful implementation of the response plan led to containment and interruption of the outbreak within 6 months of its identification. The concerted approach adopted in response to this outbreak could serve as a model for responding to polio outbreaks in settings of conflict and political instability…