Maternal and Child Health Journal Volume 21, Issue 5, May 2017

Maternal and Child Health Journal
Volume 21, Issue 5, May 2017
http://link.springer.com/journal/10995/21/5/page/1

From the Field
Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceptions About Routine Childhood Vaccinations Among Jewish Ultra-Orthodox Mothers Residing in Communities with Low Vaccination Coverage in the Jerusalem District
Chen Stein Zamir, Avi Israeli
Abstract
Background and aims
Childhood vaccinations are an important component of primary prevention. Maternal and Child Health (MCH) clinics in Israel provide routine vaccinations without charge. Several vaccine-preventable-diseases outbreaks (measles, mumps) emerged in Jerusalem in the past decade. We aimed to study attitudes and knowledge on vaccinations among mothers, in communities with low immunization coverage.
Methods
A qualitative study including focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Results Low immunization coverage was defined below the district’s mean (age 2 years, 2013) for measles-mumps-rubella-varicella 1st dose (MMR1\MMRV1) and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis 4th dose (DTaP4), 96 and 89%, respectively. Five communities re included, all were Jewish ultra-orthodox. The mothers’ (n=87) median age was 30 years and median number of children 4. Most mothers (94%) rated vaccinations as the main activity in the MCH clinics with overall positive attitudes. Knowledge about vaccines and vaccination schedule was inadequate. Of vaccines scheduled at ages 0–2 years (n=13), the mean number mentioned was 3.9 ± 2.8 (median 4, range 0–9). Vaccines mentioned more often were outbreak-related (measles, mumps, polio) and HBV (given to newborns). Concerns about vaccines were obvious, trust issues and religious beliefs were not. Vaccination delay was very common and timeliness was considered insignificant. Practical difficulties in adhering to the recommended schedule prevailed. The vaccinations visits were associated with pain and stress. Overall, there was a sense of self-responsibility accompanied by inability to influence others.
Conclusion
Investigating maternal knowledge and attitudes on childhood vaccinations provides insights that may assist in planning tailored intervention programs aimed to increase both vaccination coverage and timeliness.

Original Paper
Vaccination Coverage and Timelines Among Children 0–6 Months in Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo: A Prospective Cohort Study
Paul N. Zivich, Landry Kiketa, Bienvenu Kawende