From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

Obstetrics & Gynecology
129():86S–87S, MAY 2017
Challenges to National Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Program Implementation in Developing Countries [18h]
T Shirazian, C Smith, J Fisher
Abstract
INTRODUCTION:
In 2012, an estimated 527,624 women were diagnosed with cervical cancer globally, and an estimated 265,653 women died from the disease. Of deaths attributed to cervical cancer, 90% occur in low and middle-income countries (LMIC) due to lack of access to screening and treatment. Vaccines protecting against the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) causing cervical cancer have been available since 2006, but little is known about their national implementation in LMIC.
METHODS:
Using the PubMed database, literature was reviewed for any LMIC with national or pilot HPV programs. 2014 World Bank definitions and data were used to identify LMIC. In addition to the literature search, websites of organizations with information regarding cervical cancer programs, including Cervical Cancer Action, ICO Information Centre on HPV and Cancer, and PATH, were reviewed.
RESULTS:
Thirty LMIC were identified with national HPV programs. Four of the thirty began their programs in 2015 or 2016 with little data available. Fifteen countries do not report coverage rates or programmatic features, suggesting limited scope of their HPV national programs. Of eleven countries reporting coverage rates, these rates vary dramatically, from 5% to 99%. Of countries with available data, all of them target girls aged 9-17 but use a variety of school and clinic-based delivery methods. Only three of the thirty countries receive GAVI support for vaccine purchasing.
CONCLUSION:
Given the disproportionate burden of cervical cancer-related mortality in LMIC and the availability of the HPV vaccine, further research on the effectiveness of national HPV vaccine programs is warranted.
 
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Available online 8 May 2017
In Press, Corrected Proof
Research Article
Feasibility of Text Message Influenza Vaccine Safety Monitoring During Pregnancy
Melissa S. Stockwell, MD, MPH, Maria Cano, MD, MPH, Kathleen Jakob, BSN, Karen R. Broder, MD, Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman, MD, MSc, Paula M. Castaño, MD, MPH
Abstract
Introduction
The feasibility and accuracy of text messaging to monitor events after influenza vaccination throughout pregnancy and the neonatal period has not been studied, but may be important for seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines and future maternal vaccines.
Methods
This prospective observational study was conducted during 2013–2014 and analyzed in 2015–2016. Enrolled pregnant women receiving inactivated influenza vaccination at a gestational age Results
Most (80.2%, n=166) eligible women enrolled. Median gestational age was 8.9 (SD=3.9) weeks at vaccination. Response rates remained high (80.0%−95.2%). Only one Day 0–2 fever was reported. Women reported via text both pregnancy- and non-pregnancy−specific health events, not all associated with medical visits. Most pregnancy-specific events in the electronic medical record (EMR) were reported via text message. Of all enrollees, 84.9% completed the study (131 reported live birth, ten reported pregnancy loss). Two losses reported via text were not medically attended; there was one additional EMR-identified loss. Gestational age and weight at birth were similar between text message−reported and EMR-abstracted data and 95% CIs were overlapping for proportions of prematurity, low birth weight, small for gestational age, and major birth defects, as identified by text message−reported versus EMR-abstracted plus text message−reported versus EMR-abstracted data only.
Conclusions
This study demonstrated the feasibility of text messaging for influenza vaccine safety surveillance sustained throughout pregnancy. In these women receiving inactivated influenza vaccination during pregnancy, post-vaccination fever was infrequent and a typical pattern of maternal and neonatal health outcomes was observed.
 
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Available online 8 May 2017
In Press, Corrected Proof
Feasibility of Text Message Influenza Vaccine Safety Monitoring During Pregnancy
MS Stockwell, M Cano, K Jakob, KR Broder
Abstract
Introduction
The feasibility and accuracy of text messaging to monitor events after influenza vaccination throughout pregnancy and the neonatal period has not been studied, but may be important for seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines and future maternal vaccines.
Methods
This prospective observational study was conducted during 2013–2014 and analyzed in 2015–2016. Enrolled pregnant women receiving inactivated influenza vaccination at a gestational age Results
Most (80.2%, n=166) eligible women enrolled. Median gestational age was 8.9 (SD=3.9) weeks at vaccination. Response rates remained high (80.0%−95.2%). Only one Day 0–2 fever was reported. Women reported via text both pregnancy- and non-pregnancy−specific health events, not all associated with medical visits. Most pregnancy-specific events in the electronic medical record (EMR) were reported via text message. Of all enrollees, 84.9% completed the study (131 reported live birth, ten reported pregnancy loss). Two losses reported via text were not medically attended; there was one additional EMR-identified loss. Gestational age and weight at birth were similar between text message−reported and EMR-abstracted data and 95% CIs were overlapping for proportions of prematurity, low birth weight, small for gestational age, and major birth defects, as identified by text message−reported versus EMR-abstracted plus text message−reported versus EMR-abstracted data only.
Conclusions
This study demonstrated the feasibility of text messaging for influenza vaccine safety surveillance sustained throughout pregnancy. In these women receiving inactivated influenza vaccination during pregnancy, post-vaccination fever was infrequent and a typical pattern of maternal and neonatal health outcomes was observed.
 
Journal of Gynecological Research and Obstetrics
Published: 08 April, 2017
Research Article
Human Papilloma Virus vaccine–awareness and acceptability amongst medical students in a tertiary teaching hospital in South India
S Haritha, S Kumar, S Lakshminarayanan, P Dasari
Abstract
Objectives: To evaluate awareness and acceptability of HPV vaccine amongst medical students in a tertiary teaching hospital.
Materials and methods: This was a cross sectional descriptive study carried out in a tertiary hospital in South India in January 2015. A self-administered questionnaire in English was given to 310 undergraduate medical students after obtaining consent. Parameters studied included awareness and acceptability of HPV vaccine. Data was analysed using SPSS 16 software.
Results: Response rate in this study was 100%.40% of students were Conclusion: There is a lack of adequate knowledge regarding HPV prevention even among medical students. Health education and awareness campaigns on HPV prevention with more attention to the benefits of vaccination are necessary in order to improve acceptance of vaccination thereby preventing cervical cancer in future.
 
The Patient – Patient-Centered Outcomes Research
First Online: 04 May 2017
Systematic Review
Individual Preferences for Child and Adolescent Vaccine Attributes: A Systematic Review of the Stated Preference Literature
C Michaels-Igbokwe, S MacDonald, GR Currie
Abstract
Background
Discrete choice experiments are increasingly used to assess preferences for vaccines and vaccine service delivery.
Objectives
To synthesize and critically assess the application of discrete choice experiments in childhood/adolescent vaccines, to describe how discrete choice experiments have been applied to understand preferences, and to evaluate the use of discrete choice experiment data to inform estimates of vaccine uptake.
Methods
We conducted a systematic review of six electronic databases. Included studies were discrete choice experiments and conjoint analyses published from 2000 to 2016 related to childhood/adolescent vaccines where respondents were parents, children/adolescents, or service providers. Validity assessment was used to assess study quality and risk of bias.
Results
In total, 27 articles were included, representing 21 different studies. A majority of articles were published between 2011 and 2016. Vaccines studied included human papillomavirus (24%), influenza (19%), meningococcal vaccines (14%), childhood vaccines (14%), hypothetical vaccines (10%), hepatitis B (5%), and diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (5%). Most studies assessed parent preferences (67%). The most common attributes were risk (24%), degree/duration of protection (21%), and cost (15%). Commonly reported outcome measures were estimates of uptake (33%), willingness-to-pay (22%), and other marginal rates of substitution (14%). Validity assessments yielded high scores overall. Areas of weakness included low response rates, inefficient experimental design, and failure to conduct formative qualitative work and a pilot of the discrete choice experiment.
Conclusion
This is the first systematic review of childhood/adolescent vaccine-related discrete choice experiments. In future, special attention should be paid to ensuring that choice context and discrete choice experiment design are compatible to generate reliable estimates of uptake.

 

Clinical Infectious Disease
Published:  10 May 2017  cix444.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix444
Correspondence
The response of the peer review system to the Ebola and Zika virus epidemic 
Andreas Ronit, MD
Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9B; DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø; Denmark E-Mail: ; Phone: (+45) 3545 0859, Fax: (+45) 3545 6648
Dear Editor,
An effective and rapid response to emerging infectious diseases, such as the West African Ebola Epidemic or the Zika Virus Epidemic, requires both availability and fast dissemination of data. Hence, a number of life science journals offer fast track publications and a few journals also allow publication of papers where data was uploaded in real-time before submission (i.e. preprints) [1,2]. The latter practice is common in the physical and formal science publications, but the majority of biomedical literature is still published using the conventional peer review system [3].
Last year a seminal study assessed time from submission to acceptance of papers indexed in PubMed [4]. The primary conclusion was that paper acceptance time had been stable for 30 years at a median of approximately 100 days. Data was made available online and could be stratified according to certain journal types which enabled further analyses of the peer review system within medical specialties [5].
However, applying text mining techniques on MEDLINE data exported from PubMed, specific diseases may be studied as well. To my knowledge, there are no reports of paper acceptance time stratified by diseases entity. In lieu of the effort made by some journals to create fast track systems for situations requiring a fast response, it would be informative to assess whether the peer review systems was able to respond with faster paper acceptance times to recent viral epidemics. A lower peer review time for these diseases compared to the average PubMed paper would be expected due to the urgency and, presumably, a larger number of fast track publications.
R code for extractions of timestamps in MEDLINE can be used as a template to study peer review times associated with other diseases. This code is available as supplementary material. In short, acceptance time was calculated for all publications containing a) EBOLA[MeSH] or EBOV[MeSH] and 1980-2013[year] (before the epidemic), b) EBOLA[MeSH] or EBOV[MeSH] and 2013-2017 [year] (during and after the epidemic), c) Zika[MeSH] and 2015-2017[year] (current epidemic), and d) herpes[MeSH] and 2013-2017[year] for reference.
Histograms depict paper acceptance time for the three first categories. Ebola papers from 1980 to 2013 required a median [IQR] of 94 days (54-103), whereas Ebola papers during the recent epidemic required 63 days (27-112), P These analyses are descriptive and may be confounded by several factors including journal and publication type (e.g. commentaries or editorials). Moreover, time stamps are not available for all articles and some journals use the revision date, rather than the submission date, to indicate the start date, creating bias towards lower acceptance time.
In conclusion, although the peer review system is under debate [4], it is reassuring that the scientific journals seem to be able to respond with faster review times to recent viral epidemics.
FUNDING
The study was conducted, analyzed, and written by the author without involvement of any commercial party.
COMPETING INTERESTS
AR: Travelling grants from Gilead.