Targeted human papillomavirus vaccination for young men who have sex with men in Australia yields significant population benefits and is cost-effective

Vaccine
Volume 35, Issue 37, Pages 4825-5080 (5 September 2017)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0264410X/35/37?sdc=1

Targeted human papillomavirus vaccination for young men who have sex with men in Australia yields significant population benefits and is cost-effective
Original Research Article
Pages 4923-4929
Lei Zhang, David G. Regan, Jason J. Ong, Manoj Gambhir, Eric P.F. Chow, Huachun Zou, Matthew Law, Jane Hocking, Christopher K. Fairley
Abstract
Background
We investigated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a targeted human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program for young (15–26) men who have sex with men (MSM).
Methods
We developed a compartmental model to project HPV epidemic trajectories in MSM for three vaccination scenarios: a boys program, a targeted program for young MSM only and the combination of the two over 2017–2036. We assessed the gain in quality-adjusted-life-years (QALY) in 190,000 Australian MSM.
Results
A targeted program for young MSM only that achieved 20% coverage per year, without a boys program, will prevent 49,283 (31,253–71,500) cases of anogenital warts, 191 (88–319) person-years living with anal cancer through 2017–2036 but will only stablise anal cancer incidence. In contrast, a boys program will prevent 82,056 (52,100–117,164) cases of anogenital warts, 447 (204–725) person-years living with anal cancers through 2017–2036 and see major declines in anal cancer. This can reduce 90% low- and high-risk HPV in young MSM by 2024 and 2032, respectively, but will require vaccinating ≥84% of boys. Adding a targeted program for young MSM to an existing boys program would prevent an additional 14,912 (8479–21,803) anogenital wart and 91 (42–152) person-years living with anal cancer. In combination with a boys’ program, a catch-up program for young MSM will cost an additional $AUD 6788 ($4628–11,989) per QALY gained, but delaying its implementation reduced its cost-effectiveness.
Conclusions
A boys program that achieved coverage of about 84% will result in a 90% reduction in HPV. A targeted program for young MSM is cost-effective if timely implemented.