Reports/Research/Analysis/Commentary/Conferences/Meetings/Book Watch/Tenders

Reports/Research/Analysis/Commentary/Conferences/Meetings/Book Watch/Tenders

Vaccines and Global Health: The Week in Review has expanded its coverage of new reports, books, research and analysis published independent of the journal channel covered in Journal Watch below. Our interests span immunization and vaccines, as well as global public health, health governance, and associated themes. If you would like to suggest content to be included in this service, please contact David Curry at: david.r.curry@centerforvaccineethicsandpolicy.org
 
2018 Antimicrobial Resistance Benchmark
Access to Medicine Foundation
January 2018 :: 185 pages
PDF: https://amrbenchmark.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Antimicrobial-Resistance-Benchmark-2018.pdf
The Antimicrobial Resistance Benchmark provides the first independent assessment of how pharmaceutical companies are responding to AMR. The 30 companies in scope include those
with the largest R&D divisions, the largest market presence, and specific expertise in developing critically needed medicines and vaccines. The goal of the Antimicrobial Resistance Benchmark is
to guide and incentivise such companies to adopt and implement effective actions for tackling AMR. It highlights where good ideas for limiting AMR are being implemented and where action
is still required. The AMR Benchmark is independently funded by UK AID and the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport.

Key Findings
:: There are 28 antibiotics for high-priority pathogens in late stages of development. However, only two of these are supported by plans to ensure the successful candidate can be made accessible and used wisely once it reaches the market.

:: Nearly half of companies evaluated are involved in efforts to track patterns in antibiotic drug resistance, with AMR surveillance programmes running in 147 countries. Pneumonia is the most widely-tracked infection.

:: Eight companies are setting limits on the levels of antibiotics that can be released into the environment in wastewaters at their antibiotic manufacturing facilities. Yet no company publishes what is released in practice.
:: Four companies are taking steps to separate sales agents’ bonuses from the volume of antibiotics they sell. GSK and Shionogi have fully separated the two globally, Pfizer is piloting that approach in certain territories, and Novartis is taking steps toward adjusting its sales teams incentives.