From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

 

Journal of Community Health
First Online: 05 May 2018
Assessing and Improving Zoster Vaccine Uptake in a Homeless Population
L Kaplan-Weisman, E Waltermaurer, C Crump
Abstract
The herpes zoster (shingles) vaccine is recommended for all adults aged ≥ 60 years without contraindications to prevent shingles and post-herpetic neuralgia. There are no published studies on zoster vaccination rates, barriers, or workflows in adults who have experienced homelessness. Due to barriers specific to this vaccine, including difficulty determining insurance coverage, high upfront costs, need for storage in a freezer, and under-prescription by physicians, uptake is lower compared to other recommended vaccines for older adults. To address these barriers, we developed a new approach of partnering our on-site primary care clinic in a transitional homeless shelter with a local pharmacy and offering vaccination on Shingles Immunization Days with a goal of matching or exceeding the national zoster immunization rate of 30.6%. Over a 3-year period, the live attenuated zoster vaccine was offered to 86% of eligible patients resulting in an immunization rate of 38.1%. This is higher than the estimated national rate but significantly lower than rates of tetanus (80.6%), pneumococcal (76.3%), and influenza (69.6%) vaccination in the same population, highlighting the unique obstacles to zoster immunization. Major reasons that patients were not immunized included lack of insurance coverage and patient refusal of all vaccines. Our findings demonstrate that homeless adults are interested in zoster vaccination and a model of on-site primary care in a shelter partnering with a pharmacy can successfully improve vaccine uptake in this population. Coverage of the new inactivated zoster vaccine under Medicare Part B could increase the national zoster immunization rate.
 
 
System Dynamics Review
Volume 33, Issue 2  Pages: 87-180  April/June 2017
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/10991727/current
Early View – Main Article
Using integrated modeling to support the global eradication of vaccine‐preventable diseases
RJ Duintjer Tebbens, KM Thompson – 2018
Abstract
The long‐term management of global disease eradication initiatives involves numerous inherently dynamic processes, health and economic trade‐offs, significant uncertainty and variability, rare events with big consequences, complex and interrelated decisions, and a requirement for cooperation among a large number of stakeholders. Over the course of more than 16 years of collaborative modeling efforts to support the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, we developed increasingly complex integrated system dynamics models that combined numerous analytical approaches, including differential equation‐based modeling, risk and decision analysis, discrete‐event and individual‐based simulation, probabilistic uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, health economics and optimization. We discuss the central role of systems thinking and system dynamics in the overall effort and the value of integrating different modeling approaches to appropriately address the trade‐offs involved in some of the policy questions. We discuss practical challenges of integrating different analytical tools and we provide our perspective on the future of integrated modeling.
 
 
Influenza and other respiratory viruses
Volume 12, Issue 3  Pages: 305-420  May 2018
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/17502659/current
Accepted Manuscript
65 Years of influenza surveillance by a WHO‐coordinated global network
T Ziegler, A Mamahit, NJ Cox –
ABSTRACT
The 1918 devastating influenza pandemic left a lasting impact on influenza experts and the public, and the importance of global influenza surveillance was soon recognized. The WHO Global Influenza Surveillance Network (GISN) was founded in 1952 and renamed to Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System in 2011 upon the adoption by the World Health Assembly, of the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework for the Sharing of Influenza Viruses and Access to Vaccines and Other Benefits (“PIP Framework”). The importance of influenza surveillance had been recognized and promoted by experts prior to the years leading up to the establishment of WHO. In the 65 years of its existence, the Network has grown to comprise 143 National Influenza Centers recognized by WHO, 6 WHO Collaborating Centers, 4 Essential Regulatory Laboratories, and 13 H5 Reference Laboratories. The Network has proven its excellence throughout these 65 years, providing detailed information on circulating seasonal influenza viruses, as well as immediate response to the influenza pandemics in 1957, 1968, and 2009, and to threats caused by animal influenza viruses and by zoonotic transmission of coronaviruses. For its central role in global public health, the Network has been highly recognized by its many partners and by international bodies. Several generations of world renown influenza scientists have brought the Network to where it is now and they will take it forward to the future, as influenza will remain a pre-eminent threat to humans and to animals.
 
 
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology
March 2018 Volume 95, p1-142
https://www.jclinepi.com/issue/S0895-4356(17)X0016-4
Controversy and Debate on Dengue Vaccine Series
Controversy and debate on dengue vaccine series—paper 1: review of a licensed dengue vaccine: inappropriate subgroup analyses and selective reporting may cause harm in mass vaccination programs
Antonio L. Dans, Leonila F. Dans, Mary Ann D. Lansang, Maria Asuncion A. Silvestre, Gordon H. Guyatt
Published online: November 24, 2017
Highlights
:: The possibility that dengue vaccines can cause severe dengue has led to serious concern regarding the safety of mass vaccination programs.
:: This paper points out problems in the analyses of a published meta-analysis addressing this safety issue for a new vaccine against dengue fever—Dengvaxia.
:: Although the authors of the meta-analysis show a sevenfold rise in hospitalization for dengue fever in children <5 years old, they fail to point out two signals of harm for another outcome—hospitalization for severe dengue fever in children younger than 9 years, the relative risk was 8.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5, 146.8), and in the overall study group, the relative risk was 5.5 (95% CI: 0.9, 33).
:: The selective reporting and inappropriate subgroup claims mask the potential harm of dengue mass vaccination programs.
:: Countries planning public use of the vaccine must conduct diligent postmarketing surveillance, secure informed consent from parents of potential recipients, and closely monitor the results of ongoing long-term follow-up of clinical trial participants.
Abstract
Severe life-threatening dengue fever usually occurs when a child is infected by dengue virus a second time. This is caused by a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). Since dengue vaccines can mimic a first infection in seronegative children (those with no previous infection), a natural infection later in life could lead to severe disease. The possibility that dengue vaccines can cause severe dengue through ADE has led to serious concern regarding the safety of mass vaccination programs. A published meta-analysis addressed this safety issue for a new vaccine against dengue fever—Dengvaxia. The trials in this meta-analysis have been used to campaign for mass vaccination programs in developing countries. We discuss the results of this paper and point out problems in the analyses. Reporting the findings in an Asian trial (CYD14), the authors show a sevenfold rise in one outcome—hospitalization for dengue fever in children <5 years old. However, they fail to point out two signals of harm for another outcome—hospitalization for severe dengue fever (as confirmed by an independent data monitoring committee): 1. In children younger than 9 years, the relative risk was 8.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5, 146.8), and 2. In the overall study group, the relative risk was 5.5 (95% CI: 0.9, 33).

The authors conduct a subgroup analysis to support claims that the vaccine is probably safe among children aged 9 years or more. This subgroup analysis has limited credibility because: (1) it was a post hoc analysis; (2) it was one of a large number of subgroup analyses; (3) the test of interaction was not reported, but was insignificant (P=0.14); and (4) there is no biological basis for a threshold age of 9 years. The more likely explanation for the higher risk in younger children is ADE, that is, more frequent seronegativity, rather than age itself. The selective reporting and inappropriate subgroup claims mask the potential harm of dengue mass vaccination programs. Countries planning public use of the vaccine must conduct diligent postmarketing surveillance, secure informed consent from parents of potential recipients, and closely monitor the results of ongoing long-term follow-up of clinical trial participants.

Controversy and debate on dengue vaccine series—paper 2: response to review of a licensed dengue vaccine: inappropriate subgroup analyses and selective reporting may cause harm in mass vaccination programs
Sri Rezeki S. Hadinegoro, Jose Luis Arredondo-García, Maria Rosario Capeding, Sophie Pallardy, Fernando Noriega, Alain Bouckenooghe
Published online: January 3, 2018

Controversy and debate on dengue vaccine series—paper 3: final response to review of a licensed dengue vaccine: inappropriate subgroup analyses and selective reporting may cause harm in mass vaccination programs
Antonio L. Dans, Leonila F. Dans, Mary Ann D. Lansang, Maria Asuncion A. Silvestre, Gordon H. Guyatt
Published online: January 3, 2018