Media/Policy Watch

Media/Policy Watch

This watch section is intended to alert readers to substantive news, analysis and opinion from the general media and selected think tanks and similar organizations on vaccines, immunization, global public health and related themes. Media Watch is not intended to be exhaustive, but indicative of themes and issues CVEP is actively tracking. This section will grow from an initial base of newspapers, magazines and blog sources, and is segregated from Journal Watch above which scans the peer-reviewed journal ecology.

We acknowledge the Western/Northern bias in this initial selection of titles and invite suggestions for expanded coverage. We are conservative in our outlook in adding news sources which largely report on primary content we are already covering above. Many electronic media sources have tiered, fee-based subscription models for access. We will provide full-text where content is published without restriction, but most publications require registration and some subscription level.
 
 
The Atlantic
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
[No new, unique, relevant content]
 

BBC
http://www.bbc.co.uk/
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
29 Sep 2018
The History Hour: The Creation of the Cervical Cancer Vaccine
[Audio]…The creation of the cervical cancer vaccine, other topics…
 

The Economist
http://www.economist.com/
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
Influenza – The centenary of the 20th century’s worst catastrophe
“Spanish flu” probably killed more people than both world wars combined
Sep 27th 2018
 

Financial Times
http://www.ft.com/home/uk
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
[No new, unique, relevant content]

Forbes
http://www.forbes.com/
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
[No new, unique, relevant content]

Foreign Affairs
http://www.foreignaffairs.com/
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
Health Without Wealth
The world has been getting healthier in ways that should make us worry.
26 September 2018
By Thomas J. Bollyky
…The lesson is not that progress against disease is not worthwhile or that it came too soon to developing nations. Nor is it that the war against microbes is over: global health threats, such as pandemic flu and antibiotic-resistant bugs, still loom. There is no worthier goal than reducing unnecessary pain and preventing deaths, especially among children. And a dire future is not inevitable; healthier populations can still lead poor countries to prosperity, just as they did in the past. To make sure that they do, the world needs to pair global health aid with investments that can help countries improve their health-care systems…At the same time, developing countries need to devote more resources to their cities and health-care systems…

Foreign Policy
http://foreignpolicy.com/
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
Argument
The Next Pandemic Will Be Arriving Shortly
Deadly diseases like Ebola and the avian flu are only one flight away. The U.S. government must start taking preparedness seriously.
By Lisa Monaco, Vin Gupta
| September 28, 2018, 5:01 PM

The Guardian
http://www.guardiannews.com/
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
[No new, unique, relevant content]
 

New Yorker
http://www.newyorker.com/
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
[No new, unique, relevant content]

 
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
Opinion
Letters
For Progress on Vaccine Development
A researcher says we need a moonshot-level effort
To the Editor:

Money Needed to Develop Vaccines, Study Says” (Science Times, Global Health, Sept. 11) discussed the critical need to increase funding for developing vaccines for significant global public health threats.

I worked for more than 25 years trying to develop a vaccine for H.I.V., and the reality is that traditional approaches to vaccine development have now hit a critical impasse. Despite decades of work and billions in investment, vaccines for H.I.V., tuberculosis, cancers, neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases have evaded our best efforts, and we remain woefully unprepared for the next pandemic.
This lack of progress is largely due to a fundamental gap in our understanding of how our immune system prevents and controls disease. Rather than primarily funding individual efforts on single diseases, we need significant resources focused on decoding the human immune system, on a moonshot-level scale of the Human Genome Project.
Technological advances in biomedicine and computer sciences have provided the tools necessary to undertake this effort, but we must act before these diseases take an even greater toll.
Wayne Koff
New York
The writer is president and chief executive of the Human Vaccines Project, a nonprofit.

Wall Street Journal
http://online.wsj.com/home-page?_wsjregion=na,us&_homepage=/home/us
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
[No new, unique, relevant content]

Washington Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/
Accessed 29 Sep 2018
Flu broke records for deaths, illnesses in 2017-2018, new CDC numbers show
Lena H. Sun Sep 27, 2018

Ebola is back. Is Africa ready?
27 September 2018.