From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

 

PNAS |
December 18, 2018 | vol. 115 | no. 51
SPECIAL FEATURE: PERSPECTIVE
Why the evolution of vaccine resistance is less of a concern than the evolution of drug resistance
David A. Kennedya,1 and Andrew F. Reada
Edited by Rino Rappuoli, GlaxoSmithKline, Siena, Italy, and approved March 7, 2018 (received for review November 29, 2017)

Vaccines and antimicrobial drugs both impose strong selection for resistance. Yet only drug resistance is a major challenge for 21st century medicine. Why is drug resistance ubiquitous and not vaccine resistance? Part of the answer is that vaccine resistance is far less likely to evolve than drug resistance. But what happens when vaccine resistance does evolve? We review six putative cases. We find that in contrast to drug resistance, vaccine resistance is harder to detect and harder to confirm and that the mechanistic basis is less well understood. Nevertheless, in the cases we examined, the pronounced health benefits associated with vaccination have largely been sustained. Thus, we contend that vaccine resistance is less of

a concern than drug resistance because it is less likely to evolve and when it does, it is less harmful to human and animal health and well-being. Studies of pathogen strains that evolve the capacity to replicate and transmit from vaccinated hosts will enhance our ability to develop next-generation vaccines that minimize the risk of harmful pathogen evolution.

Antimicrobial resistance and the role of vaccines
David E. Bloom, Steven Black, David Salisbury, and Rino Rappuoli
Proc Natl Acad Sci USA December 18, 2018 115 (51) 12868-12871; https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1717157115

Toward economic evaluation of the value of vaccines and other health technologies in addressing AMR

  1. P. Sevilla, David E. Bloom, Daniel Cadarette, Mark Jit, and Marc Lipsitch

Proc Natl Acad Sci USA December 18, 2018 115 (51) 12911-12919; https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1717161115

 

PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News
December 2018, Volume 818, Issue 1
Clinical study
Transparency and consistency of economic evidence on vaccines
J Pike –

Willingness to pay for dengue vaccination in Malaysia
HY Yeo