Members of Minority and Underserved Communities Set Priorities for Health Research

The Milbank Quarterly
A Multidisciplinary Journal of Population Health and Health Policy
Volume 96, Issue 4   Pages: 607-882  December 2018

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/14680009/current
Original Scholarship
Members of Minority and Underserved Communities Set Priorities for Health Research
SUSAN DORR GOOLD, C. DANIEL MYERS,MARION DANIS, JULIA ABELSON, STEVE BARNETT, KAREN CALHOUN, ERIC G. CAMPBELL, LYNETTE LaHAHNN, ADNAN HAMMAD, RENÉ PÉREZ, ROSENBAUM, HYUNGJIN MYRA KIM, CENGIZ SALMAN, LISA SZYMECKO, ZACHARY E. ROWE

Pages: 675-705
First Published: 09 December 2018 Abstract
Policy Points
:: Engaging and involving underrepresented communities when setting research priorities could make the scientific research agenda more equitable, more just, and more responsive to their needs and values.
:: Groups and individuals from minority and underserved communities strongly prioritized child health and mental health research, often choosing to invest at the highest possible level.
:: Groups consisting of predominantly Native American or Arab American participants invested in culture and beliefs research at the highest level, while many groups did not select it at all. The priority given to culture and beliefs research by these groups illustrates the importance of paying special attention to unique preferences, and not just commonly held views, when getting public input on spending priorities for research.