Humanitarian mechanism for vaccines used for first time in Europe to counter high prices

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Humanitarian mechanism for vaccines used for first time in Europe to counter high prices – MSF
:: A new humanitarian mechanism for vaccines has been used for the first time in Europe, allowing MSF to vaccinate refugee children in Greece at an affordable price.
:: Children were vaccinated with the pnemococcal conjugate vaccine, which is usually prohibitively expensive in Europe.
:: We urge for more vaccines to be included in the humanitarian mechanism, allowing children to be protected against more diseases.
Press Release 12 April 2019 Athens — Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has started vaccinating refugee children on the Greek islands of Chios, Samos and Lesvos using a programme set up to allow children in humanitarian emergencies to access the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) at an affordable price.
This marks the first time the ‘Humanitarian Mechanism’ is used in a high-income country—the programme offers the vaccine at a special reduced price of about US$9 per child (for the three doses needed for full immunisation) for humanitarian use by civil society organisations and UN agencies. Pneumonia remains the single largest killer of children under five worldwide, and children living in precarious conditions—including those in refugee camps—are at particularly high risk.