CDC/ACIP [to 29 Jun 2019]

CDC/ACIP [to 29 Jun 2019]
http://www.cdc.gov/media/index.html
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/index.html
Thursday, June 27, 2019
CDC Press Release: Most Americans Have Never Had an HIV Test, New Data Show
The CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of 13 – 64 years be screened at least once in their lifetime, yet less than 40% of people in the U.S. have ever been tested for HIV, according to a CDC report published today in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

The new data, released on National HIV Testing Day, underscore the urgent need to scale up HIV testing to end America’s HIV epidemic. The analysis of 2016-2017 data from a national population-based survey suggest most people are not getting the recommended screening, even in areas with a high burden of HIV. Highlights of the analysis include the following:
:: Overall, fewer than 40% of people in the United States have ever had an HIV test.
:: Nationally, less than 30% of people in the United States most at risk of acquiring HIV were tested in the past year.
:: In the 50 local jurisdictions where more than half of HIV diagnoses occur, less than 35% of people recommended for annual HIV testing were tested in the past year.
:: In states with rural areas that are particularly affected by HIV, just 26% of people recommended for annual HIV testing were tested in the past year…

MMWR News Synopsis for Friday, June 28, 2019
HIV Screening in 50 Local Jurisdictions Accounting for the Majority of New HIV Diagnoses and Seven States with Disproportionate Occurrence of HIV in Rural Areas, 2016–2017
CDC analysis demonstrates the urgent need to expand HIV testing as part of the proposed federal plan to end the U.S. HIV epidemic. CDC recommends that everyone ages 13-64 years be screened for HIV at least once in their lifetime. New CDC data show that fewer than 40% of people in the U.S. have ever been tested for HIV. The 2016-2017 data, from a national population-based survey, suggest that most people are not getting the recommended screening – even in areas with the greatest burden of HIV. Expanding HIV testing is a critical part of the proposed federal plan to end the U.S. HIV epidemic, as testing can be a gateway to prevention options like pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) or can link a person with HIV to care and treatment that protects their health and prevents new infections.