Structural coercion in the context of community engagement in global health research conducted in a low resource setting in Africa

BMC Medical Ethics
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmedethics/content
(Accessed 26 Sep 2020)

 

Structural coercion in the context of community engagement in global health research conducted in a low resource setting in Africa
Authors: Deborah Nyirenda, Salla Sariola, Patricia Kingori, Bertie Squire, Chiwoza Bandawe, Michael Parker and Nicola Desmond
Content type: Research article
21 September 2020
The results showed that structural coercion arose due to an interplay of factors pertaining to social-economic context, study design and power relations among research stakeholders. The involvement of community leaders, government stakeholders, and power inequalities among research stakeholders affected some participants’ ability to make autonomous decisions about research participation. These results have been presented under the themes of perception of research as development, research participants’ motivation to access individual benefits, the power of vernacular translations to influence research participation, and coercive power of leaders.