MMWR News Synopsis Friday, June 10, 2021

MMWR News Synopsis Friday, June 10, 2021
:: Progress Toward Rubella Elimination — World Health Organization European Region, 2005–2019
:: Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Administration of Selected Routine Childhood and Adolescent Vaccinations — 10 U.S. Jurisdictions, March–September 2020
:: Genomic Surveillance for SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States, December 2020–May 2021
:: Hospitalization of Adolescents Aged 12–17 Years with Laboratory-Confirmed COVID-19 — COVID-NET, 14 States, March 1, 2020–April 24, 2021 (Early Release June 4, 2021)
:: Decreases in COVID-19 Cases, Emergency Department Visits, Hospital Admissions, and Deaths Among Older Adults Following the Introduction of COVID-19 Vaccine — United States, September 6, 2020–May 1, 2021 (Early Release June 8, 2021)

Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Administration of Selected Routine Childhood and Adolescent Vaccinations — 10 U.S. Jurisdictions, March–September 2020
Analysis of immunization data from 10 U.S. jurisdictions shows a substantial decrease in routine vaccinations during March–May 2020, when many jurisdictions enacted stay-at-home orders due to the COVID-19 pandemic, compared with the same period during in 2018 and 2019. To prevent outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, public health practitioners and health care providers should promote routine vaccination among children to ensure they are fully vaccinated as schools reopen for in-person learning.
Since the COVID-19 pandemic started, early reports from some state and local jurisdictions suggested that routine pediatric vaccinations had sharply declined, placing U.S. children at risk for vaccine-preventable diseases. To further understand the impact of the pandemic on routine childhood and adolescent vaccination, vaccine administration data from March through September 2020 from 10 U.S. jurisdictions were assessed. Fewer doses of routine childhood and adolescent vaccines were recorded during March–September 2020 than during the same periods in 2018 and 2019 in all 10 jurisdictions. The number of vaccine doses administered declined during March–May 2020, when many jurisdictions enacted stay-at-home orders. The number of vaccine doses administered during June–September, after many jurisdictions lifted stay-at-home orders in summer 2020, approached pre-pandemic levels. However, there was not a substantial increase above pre-pandemic levels, which would have been necessary to catch up children who did not receive routine vaccinations on time. This lag in catch-up vaccination might pose a serious public health threat, resulting in vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks, especially as schools reopen for in-person learning. Health care providers should assess the immunization status of all pediatric patients, including adolescents, and contact those who are behind schedule to ensure that all children are up to date.