Rejoice architecture meets social norms to accelerate vaccination in Nepal: Protocol for a mixed-method quasi-experimental study

Gates Open Research
https://gatesopenresearch.org/browse/articles
[Accessed 25 Sep 2021]

 

Study Protocol metrics
Revised
Rejoice architecture meets social norms to accelerate vaccination in Nepal: Protocol for a mixed-method quasi-experimental study [version 2; peer review: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations]
Alicia Paul, Kamana Upreti, Shraddha Nepal, Jeevan Lohani, Kriti Adhikari, Rajiv Rimal
Peer Reviewers Ann M. Weber; Nimesh Poudyal and Ondari D. Mogeni; Robert A. Bednarczyk
Funder – Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
LATEST VERSION PUBLISHED 22 Sep 2021
Abstract
Background: Each year, 600,000 children under 5 years old die from vaccine-preventable diseases globally. Immunization is an effective way to prevent many diseases, saving two to three million lives per year. The Nepal National Government recommends vaccinations for all children for 11 diseases by 15 months of age. However, only 78% of children between 1-2 years of age have received all recommended vaccines and only 43% receive them at the age-appropriate times for which they are scheduled.
Objectives: This protocol describes the development of an intervention – called “Rejoice Architecture” – that is informed by three theoretical perspectives: choice architecture, the broken windows theory, and the theory of normative social behavior. We also describe a mixed-methods approach to develop the intervention, which will improve the physical and social environments of health facilities in Makwanpur, Nepal. We hypothesize this intervention will improve immunization behaviors and intentions among mothers of children younger than 2 years, pregnant women, and prospective mothers.
Methods: We describe the qualitative formative assessment to understand existing attitudes, norms, and behaviors among caregivers, healthcare workers, and government representatives. The formative assessment will include in-depth interviews, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions. We also describe the overall quasi-experimental study design, used to assess intervention impact.
Impact: This study will contribute to the social and behavioral change communication intervention research by offering a novel strategy for increasing immunization. This study will also illustrate to policymakers the value of structural change for health service delivery.