An assessment of the vaccination of school-aged children in England against SARS-CoV-2

BMC Medicine
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmed/content
(Accessed 21 May 2022)

 

An assessment of the vaccination of school-aged children in England against SARS-CoV-2
Children and young persons are known to have a high number of close interactions, often within the school environment, which can facilitate rapid spread of infection; yet for SARS-CoV-2, it is the elderly and …
Authors: Matt J. Keeling and Sam E. Moore
Citation: BMC Medicine 2022 20:196
Content type: Research article Published on: 18 May 2022

Perceptions of the Coronavirus and COVID-19 testing and vaccination in Latinx and Indigenous Mexican immigrant communities in the Eastern Coachella Valley

BMC Public Health
http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles
(Accessed 21 May 2022)

 

Perceptions of the Coronavirus and COVID-19 testing and vaccination in Latinx and Indigenous Mexican immigrant communities in the Eastern Coachella Valley
A novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 (known as COVID-19), spread rapidly around the world, affecting all and creating an ongoing global pandemic. Across the United States, Latinx and Indigenous populations have bee…
Authors: Daniel Gehlbach, Evelyn Vázquez, Gabriela Ortiz, Erica Li, Cintya Beltrán Sánchez, Sonia Rodríguez, María Pozar and Ann M. Cheney
Citation: BMC Public Health 2022 22:1019
Content type: Research Published on: 21 May 2022

Public health and social measures to mitigate the health and economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey, Egypt, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Poland during 2020–2021: situational analysis

BMC Public Health
http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles
(Accessed 21 May 2022)

 

Public health and social measures to mitigate the health and economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey, Egypt, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Poland during 2020–2021: situational analysis
The COVID-19 pandemic had a colossal impact on human society globally. There were similarities and differences in the public health and social measures taken by countries, and comparative analysis facilitates …
Authors: Noriko Kitamura, Kaja Abbas and Dilip Nathwani
Citation: BMC Public Health 2022 22:991
Content type: Research Published on: 17 May 2022

Trinity review: integrating Registered Reports with research ethics and funding reviews

BMC Research Notes
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcresnotes/content
(Accessed 21 May 2022)

 

Trinity review: integrating Registered Reports with research ethics and funding reviews
One major source of exhaustion for researchers is the redundant paperwork of three different documents—research papers, ethics review applications, and research grant applications—for the same research plan. T…
Authors: Yuki Mori, Kaito Takashima, Kohei Ueda, Kyoshiro Sasaki and Yuki Yamada
Citation: BMC Research Notes 2022 15:184
Content type: Commentary Published on: 19 May 2022
Abstract
One major source of exhaustion for researchers is the redundant paperwork of three different documents—research papers, ethics review applications, and research grant applications—for the same research plan. This is a wasteful and redundant process for researchers, and it has a more direct impact on the career development of early-career researchers. Here, we propose a trinity review system based on Registered Reports that integrates scientific, ethics, and research funding reviews. In our proposed trinity review system, scientific and ethics reviews are undertaken concurrently for a research protocol before running the study. After the protocol is approved in principle through these review processes, a funding review will take place, and the researchers will begin their research. Following the experiments or surveys, the scientific review will be conducted on a completed version of the paper again, including the results and discussions (i.e., the full paper), and the full paper will be published once it has passed the second review. This paper provides the brief process of the trinity review system and discusses the need for and benefits of the proposed system. Although the trinity review system only applies to a few appropriate disciplines, it helps improve reproducibility and integrity.

Improving research integrity: a framework for responsible science communication

BMC Research Notes
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcresnotes/content
(Accessed 21 May 2022)

 

Improving research integrity: a framework for responsible science communication
Research integrity, an essential precept of scientific inquiry and discovery, comprises norms such as Rigor, Reproducibility, and Responsibility (the 3R’s). Over the past decades, numerous issues have arisen that challenge the reliability of scientific studies, including irreproducibility crises, lack of good scientific principles, and erroneous communications, which have impacted the public’s trust in science and its findings. Here, we highlight one important component of research integrity that is often overlooked in the discussion of proposals for improving research quality and promoting robust research; one that spans from the lab bench to the dissemination of scientific work: responsible science communication.
Authors: Ilinca I. Ciubotariu and Gundula Bosch
Citation: BMC Research Notes 2022 15:177
Content type: Commentary Published on: 15 May 2022

Precision medicine requires understanding how both sex and gender influence health

Cell
May 12, 2022 Volume 185 Issue 10 p1619-1806
https://www.cell.com/cell/current

 

Commentary
Precision medicine requires understanding how both sex and gender influence health
Nina S. Stachenfeld, Carolyn M. Mazure
Progress in studying sex as a biological variable (SABV) is slow, and the influence of gendered effects of the social environment on biology is largely unknown. Yet incorporating these concepts into basic science research will enhance our understanding human health and disease. We provide steps to move this process forward.

COVID-19 vaccines in patients with decompensated cirrhosis: a retrospective cohort on safety data and risk factors associated with unvaccinated status

Infectious Diseases of Poverty
http://www.idpjournal.com/content
[Accessed 21 May 2022]

 

COVID-19 vaccines in patients with decompensated cirrhosis: a retrospective cohort on safety data and risk factors associated with unvaccinated status
Safety data reported from the large-scale clinical trials of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine are extremely limited in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. The vaccination campaign in this spe…
Authors: Zhujun Cao, Chenxi Zhang, Shuang Zhao, Zike Sheng, Xiaogang Xiang, Ruokun Li, Zhuping Qian, Yinling Wang, Bin Chen, Ziqiang Li, Yuhan Liu, Baoyan An, Huijuan Zhou, Wei Cai, Hui Wang, Honglian Gui…
Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2022 11:56
Content type: Research Article Published on: 16 May 2022

Could China’s journey of malaria elimination extend to Africa?

Infectious Diseases of Poverty
http://www.idpjournal.com/content
[Accessed 21 May 2022]

 

Could China’s journey of malaria elimination extend to Africa?
World Health Organization (WHO) certified China malaria-free on June 30, 2021, which brightens the goal of global malaria elimination efforts. China contributed its unique innovations to the global community: …
Authors: Duoquan Wang, Shan Lv, Wei Ding, Shenning Lu, Hongwei Zhang, Kokouvi Kassegne, Shang Xia, Lei Duan, Xuejiao Ma, Lulu Huang, Roly Gosling, Joshua Levens, Salim Abdulla, Mutinta Mudenda, Moses Okpeku, Kenneth Kamwi Matengu…
Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2022 11:55
Content type: Opinion Published on: 16 May 2022

The impact of pertussis vaccine programme changes on pertussis disease burden in Manitoba, 1992–2017—an age-period-cohort analysis

International Journal of Epidemiology
Volume 51, Issue 2, April 2022
https://academic.oup.com/ije/issue

 

Infectious Disease
The impact of pertussis vaccine programme changes on pertussis disease burden in Manitoba, 1992–2017—an age-period-cohort analysis
Krista Wilkinson, Christiaan H Righolt, Lawrence J Elliott, Sergio Fanella, Salaheddin M Mahmud
International Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 51, Issue 2, April 2022, Pages 440–447, https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyac001

Association Between SARS-CoV-2 Viral Load in Wastewater and Reported Cases, Hospitalizations, and Vaccinations in Milan, March 2020 to November 2021

JAMA
May 17, 2022, Vol 327, No. 19, Pages 1849-1936
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

Research Letter
Association Between SARS-CoV-2 Viral Load in Wastewater and Reported Cases, Hospitalizations, and Vaccinations in Milan, March 2020 to November 2021
Giovanni Nattino, PhD; Sara Castiglioni, PhD; Danilo Cereda, MD, PhD; et al.
free access
JAMA. 2022;327(19):1922-1924. doi:10.1001/jama.2022.4908
This study evaluates the association between SARS-CoV-2 load in urban wastewater and surveillance indicators of infection prevalence and severity in Milan, Italy.

Ethical Considerations for the Inclusion of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical ResearchThe PRO Ethics Guidelines

JAMA
May 17, 2022, Vol 327, No. 19, Pages 1849-1936
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

Special Communication
Ethical Considerations for the Inclusion of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical ResearchThe PRO Ethics Guidelines
Samantha Cruz Rivera, PhD; Olalekan Lee Aiyegbusi, PhD; Jonathan Ives, PhD; et al.
free access has active quiz has audio
JAMA. 2022;327(19):1910-1919. doi:10.1001/jama.2022.6421
These international, consensus-based, patient-reported outcomes (PRO)–specific guidelines aim to lay out the ethical considerations that researchers, research ethics committees, and funders should take into account when conducting or reviewing PRO clinical research.

COVID-19 Vaccination—Becoming Part of the New Normal

JAMA
May 17, 2022, Vol 327, No. 19, Pages 1849-1936
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

Viewpoint
COVID-19 Vaccination—Becoming Part of the New Normal
Peter Marks, MD, PhD; Janet Woodcock, MD; Robert Califf, MD
free access
JAMA. 2022;327(19):1863-1864. doi:10.1001/jama.2022.7469
In this Viewpoint, authors from the FDA discuss how COVID-19 vaccination is an integral part of establishing a new normal, now that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, will likely circulate worldwide for the foreseeable future.

Willingness of a Multiethnic Immigrant Population to Donate Biospecimens for Research Purposes

Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume 24, issue 3, June 2022
https://link.springer.com/journal/10903/volumes-and-issues/24-3

 

Contents
Willingness of a Multiethnic Immigrant Population to Donate Biospecimens for Research Purposes
Authors (first, second and last of 12)
Amy Raines-Milenkov, Martha Felini, Jonathan Hughes
Content type: Original Paper
Open Access
Published: 26 July 2021
Pages: 705 – 712

Nativity Differences in Awareness and Knowledge About HPV Infection and Vaccination Among U.S. Adults: Findings from a National Population-Based Sample

Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume 24, issue 3, June 2022
https://link.springer.com/journal/10903/volumes-and-issues/24-3

 

Nativity Differences in Awareness and Knowledge About HPV Infection and Vaccination Among U.S. Adults: Findings from a National Population-Based Sample
Authors
Manami Bhattacharya, Serena Xiong, Annie-Laurie McRee
Content type: Brief Communication
Published: 28 August 2021
Pages: 794 – 798

Introduction to Special Issue: Gender, Migration and Digital Communication in Asia

Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies
Volume 20, 2022 Issue 2
https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wimm20/current

 

Article
Introduction to Special Issue: Gender, Migration and Digital Communication in Asia
Shiori Shakuto & Brenda S. A. Yeoh
Pages: 155-163
Published online: 15 Apr 2022
Abstract
In recent decades, the role of digital communication in the lives of migrants in Asia has greatly expanded, becoming integral to the decision to migrate, earning a living, and the practice of keeping in touch with left-behind families and friends. The papers in this Special Issue foreground how gender structures and practices within migrant households and the wider political economy shape migrants’ digital communications. They expand the breadth of our thinking about the interlinkages among gender, migration and digital communication from a range of new subject positions including transnational families, international students, and marginalized minorities in the region.

The Ethics of Human Challenge Trials Using Emerging Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome 2 VariantsGet access

Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume 225, Issue 6, 15 March 2022
https://academic.oup.com/jid/issue/225/6

 

PERSPECTIVES
The Ethics of Human Challenge Trials Using Emerging Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome 2 VariantsGet access
Abie Rohrig, Nir Eyal
The Journal of Infectious Diseases, Volume 225, Issue 6, 15 March 2022, Pages 934–937, https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiab488
Researchers are preparing for human challenge trials with emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants. We argue that these trials can be ethical.

Remdesivir and three other drugs for hospitalised patients with COVID-19: final results of the WHO Solidarity randomised trial and updated meta-analyses

The Lancet
May 21, 2022 Volume 399 Number 10339 p1917-1990
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/issue/current

 

Articles
Remdesivir and three other drugs for hospitalised patients with COVID-19: final results of the WHO Solidarity randomised trial and updated meta-analyses
WHO Solidarity Trial Consortium
Open Access
Background
The Solidarity trial among COVID-19 inpatients has previously reported interim mortality analyses for four repurposed antiviral drugs. Lopinavir, hydroxychloroquine, and interferon (IFN)-β1a were discontinued for futility but randomisation to remdesivir continued. Here, we report the final results of Solidarity and meta-analyses of mortality in all relevant trials to date.
Interpretation
Remdesivir has no significant effect on patients with COVID-19 who are already being ventilated. Among other hospitalised patients, it has a small effect against death or progression to ventilation (or both).

Framing and the formation of global health priorities

The Lancet
May 21, 2022 Volume 399 Number 10339 p1917-1990
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/issue/current

 

Series
Political Science and Health
Framing and the formation of global health priorities
Jeremy Shiffman, Yusra Ribhi Shawar
Summary
Health issues vary in the amount of attention and resources they receive from global health organisations and national governments. How issues are framed could shape differences in levels of priority. We reviewed scholarship on global health policy making to examine the role of framing in shaping global health priorities. The review provides evidence of the influence of three framing processes—securitisation, moralisation, and technification. Securitisation refers to an issue’s framing as an existential threat, moralisation as an ethical imperative, and technification as a wise investment that science can solve. These framing processes concern more than how issues are portrayed publicly. They are socio-political processes, characterised by contestation among actors in civil society, government, international organisations, foundations, and research institutions. These actors deploy various forms of power to advance particular frames as a means of securing attention and resources for the issues that concern them. The ascription of an issue as a security concern, an ethical imperative, or a wise investment is historically contingent: it is not inevitable that any given issue will be framed in one or more of these ways. A health issue’s inherent characteristics—such as the lethality of a pathogen that causes it—also shape these ascriptions, but do not fully determine them. Although commonly facing resistance, global health elites often determine which frames prevail, raising questions about the legitimacy of priority-setting processes. We draw on the review to offer ideas on how to make these processes fairer than they are at present, including a call for democratic representation even as necessary space is preserved for elite expertise.

Polygenic risk scores for CARDINAL study

Nature Genetics
Volume 54 Issue 5, May 2022
https://www.nature.com/ng/volumes/54/issues/4

 

Comment | 05 May 2022
Polygenic risk scores for CARDINAL study
The Cardiometabolic Disorders in African-Ancestry Populations (CARDINAL) study site is a well-powered, first-of-its-kind resource for developing, refining and validating methods for research into polygenic risk scores that accounts for local ancestry, to improve risk prediction in diverse populations.
Clement A. Adebamowo, Adebowale Adeyemo, Sally N. Adebamowo

Promoting the genomic revolution in Africa through the Nigerian 100K Genome Project

Nature Genetics
Volume 54 Issue 5, May 2022
https://www.nature.com/ng/volumes/54/issues/4

 

Comment | 09 May 2022
Promoting the genomic revolution in Africa through the Nigerian 100K Genome Project
To leverage the genetic diversity in Nigeria, we established the Non-Communicable Diseases Genetic Heritage Study (NCD-GHS) consortium to help produce a comprehensive catalog of human genetic variation in Nigeria and assess the burden and etiological characteristics of non-communicable diseases in 100,000 adults in Nigeria.
Segun Fatumo, Aminu Yakubu, Abasi Ene-Obong

Walking the tightrope between data sharing and data protection

Nature Medicine
Volume 28 Issue 5, May 2022
https://www.nature.com/nm/volumes/28/issues/5

 

Editorial | 18 May 2022
Walking the tightrope between data sharing and data protection
With the increase in genomic data available and the advent of new technology for mining it, balancing the needs for data sharing and data protection becomes more challenging. Different disciplines must come together to find new solutions.

The distinct impacts of race and genetic ancestry on health

Nature Medicine
Volume 28 Issue 5, May 2022
https://www.nature.com/nm/volumes/28/issues/5

 

Comment | 09 May 2022
The distinct impacts of race and genetic ancestry on health
Genetic ancestry affects human health, but this is distinct from the impact of race, a social construct that has its foundations in systemic racism. These terms need to be better defined and understood in medical research to achieve health equity.
Timothy R. Rebbeck, Brandon Mahal, Kosj Yamoah

An equitable roadmap for ending the COVID-19 pandemic

Nature Medicine
Volume 28 Issue 5, May 2022
https://www.nature.com/nm/volumes/28/issues/5

 

Comment | 05 April 2022
An equitable roadmap for ending the COVID-19 pandemic
Many governments are rolling back restrictions, but the pandemic will end only with a renewed focus on equitable distribution of vaccines and therapeutics, responsive public health plans, and policies to protect the vulnerable.
Mitsuru Mukaigawara, Ines Hassan, Devi Sridhar

Modeling comparative cost-effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine dose fractionation in India

Nature Medicine
Volume 28 Issue 5, May 2022
https://www.nature.com/nm/volumes/28/issues/5

 

Brief Communication | 24 February 2022 | Open Access
Modeling comparative cost-effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine dose fractionation in India
A multi-scale model using population-level transmission and individual-level vaccination data suggests that vaccine dose fractionation could be a cost-effective strategy for mitigating the COVID-19 pandemic in India.
Zhanwei Du, Lin Wang, Benjamin J. Cowling

Immune response to SARS-CoV-2 after a booster of mRNA-1273: an open-label phase 2 trial

Nature Medicine
Volume 28 Issue 5, May 2022
https://www.nature.com/nm/volumes/28/issues/5

 

Article | 03 March 2022 | Open Access
Immune response to SARS-CoV-2 after a booster of mRNA-1273: an open-label phase 2 trial
A third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine mRNA-1273 is safe and boosts SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody titers almost two-fold higher than the peak levels observed after completion of a two-dose series, highlighting the potential clinical benefit of a booster dose.
Laurence Chu, Keith Vrbicky, Roderick McPhee

Effectiveness of mRNA-1273 against SARS-CoV-2 Omicron and Delta variants

Nature Medicine
Volume 28 Issue 5, May 2022
https://www.nature.com/nm/volumes/28/issues/5

 

Article | 21 February 2022 | Open Access
Effectiveness of mRNA-1273 against SARS-CoV-2 Omicron and Delta variants
A test-negative case–control analysis using data from a diverse population in California, USA, demonstrates that vaccine efficacy of a three-dose regimen of the mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine is reduced against infection with the Omicron SARS-CoV-2 variant in comparison to Delta, but that efficacy against hospitalization remained high for both variants.
Hung Fu Tseng, Bradley K. Ackerson, Lei Qian

Antibody responses and correlates of protection in the general population after two doses of the ChAdOx1 or BNT162b2 vaccines

Nature Medicine
Volume 28 Issue 5, May 2022
https://www.nature.com/nm/volumes/28/issues/5

 

Article | 14 February 2022 | Open Access
Antibody responses and correlates of protection in the general population after two doses of the ChAdOx1 or BNT162b2 vaccines
A large study in the United Kingdom shows that virus-specific antibody levels associated with at least 67% protection against SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant infection last longer after two doses of BNT162b2 vaccine than after two doses of ChAdOx1 vaccine in previously uninfected individuals.
Jia Wei, Koen B. Pouwels, Chris Cunningham

Antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 variants induced by four different SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in health care workers in the Netherlands: A prospective cohort study

PLoS Medicine
http://www.plosmedicine.org/
(Accessed 21 May 2022)

 

Antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 variants induced by four different SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in health care workers in the Netherlands: A prospective cohort study
Marit J. van Gils, Ayesha Lavell, Karlijn van der Straten, Brent Appelman, Ilja Bontjer, Meliawati Poniman, Judith A. Burger, Melissa Oomen, Joey H. Bouhuijs, Lonneke A. van Vught, Marleen A. Slim, Michiel Schinkel, Elke Wynberg, Hugo D. G. van Willigen, Marloes Grobben, Khadija Tejjani, Jacqueline van Rijswijk, Jonne L. Snitselaar, Tom G. Caniels, Amsterdam UMC COVID-19 S3/HCW study group , Alexander P. J. Vlaar, Maria Prins, Menno D. de Jong, Godelieve J. de Bree, Jonne J. Sikkens, Marije K. Bomers, Rogier W. Sanders
Research Article | published 17 May 2022 PLOS Medicine
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1003991

The health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on adults who experience imprisonment globally: A mixed methods systematic review

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 21 May 2022]

 

Research Article
The health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on adults who experience imprisonment globally: A mixed methods systematic review
Hannah Kim, Emily Hughes, Alice Cavanagh, Emily Norris, Angela Gao, Susan J. Bondy, Katherine E. McLeod, Tharsan Kanagalingam, Fiona G. Kouyoumdjian
Research Article | published 20 May 2022 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0268866

What drives willingness to receive a new vaccine that prevents an emerging infectious disease? A discrete choice experiment among university students in Uganda

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 21 May 2022]

 

What drives willingness to receive a new vaccine that prevents an emerging infectious disease? A discrete choice experiment among university students in Uganda
Kimberly E. Bonner, Henry Ssekyanzi, Jonathan Sicsic, Judith E. Mueller, Traci Toomey, Angela K. Ulrich, Keith J. Horvath, James D. Neaton, Cecily Banura, Nicole E. Basta
Research Article | published 19 May 2022 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0268063

COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among health care workers in Africa: A systematic review and meta-analysis

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 21 May 2022]

 

COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among health care workers in Africa: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Martin Ackah, Louise Ameyaw, Mohammed Gazali Salifu, Delali Pearl Afi Asubonteng, Cynthia Osei Yeboah, Eugene Narkotey Annor, Eunice Abena Kwartemaa Ankapong, Hosea Boakye
Research Article | published 18 May 2022 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0268711

Supporting immunization programs to address COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: Recommendations for national and community-based stakeholders

Vaccine
Volume 40, Issue 20 Pages 2819-2894 (3 May 2022)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/vaccine/vol/40/issue/20

 

Discussion Full text access
Supporting immunization programs to address COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: Recommendations for national and community-based stakeholders
Katelyn Wells, Kelly L. Moore, Robert Bednarczyk
Pages 2819-2822

Effectiveness of adenovirus type 5 vectored and inactivated COVID-19 vaccines against symptomatic COVID-19, COVID-19 pneumonia, and severe COVID-19 caused by the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant: Evidence from an outbreak in Yunnan, China, 2021

Vaccine
Volume 40, Issue 20 Pages 2819-2894 (3 May 2022)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/vaccine/vol/40/issue/20

 

Research article Full text access
Effectiveness of adenovirus type 5 vectored and inactivated COVID-19 vaccines against symptomatic COVID-19, COVID-19 pneumonia, and severe COVID-19 caused by the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant: Evidence from an outbreak in Yunnan, China, 2021
Chao Ma, Weiwei Sun, Tingting Tang, Manhong Jia, … Zhijie An
Pages 2869-2874

Nepal measles outbreak response immunization during COVID-19: A risk-based intervention strategy

Vaccine
Volume 40, Issue 20 Pages 2819-2894 (3 May 2022)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/vaccine/vol/40/issue/20

 

Research article Open access
Nepal measles outbreak response immunization during COVID-19: A risk-based intervention strategy
Anindya Sekhar Bose, Pasang Rai, Binod Prasad Gupta, Rahul Pradhan, … Jhalak Sharma Gautam
Pages 2884-2893

Quantifying the Effect of Public Activity Intervention Policies on COVID-19 Pandemic Containment Using Epidemiologic Data From 145 Countries

Value in Health
May 2022 Volume 25 Issue 5 p677-868
https://www.valueinhealthjournal.com/current

 

THEMED SECTION: COVID-19
Quantifying the Effect of Public Activity Intervention Policies on COVID-19 Pandemic Containment Using Epidemiologic Data From 145 Countries
Jichao Sun, Yefeng Zheng, Wenhua Liang,…Man Tat Alexander Ng, Jianxing He, Nanshan Zhong
Published online: December 07, 2021
p699-708

Pre-Print Servers

Pre-Print Servers

 

Gates Open Research
https://gatesopenresearch.org/browse/articles
[No new digest content identified]

 

medRxiv
https://www.medrxiv.org/content/about-medrxiv
medRxiv is a free online archive and distribution server for complete but unpublished manuscripts (preprints) in the medical, clinical, and related health sciences. Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been certified by peer review. They should not be relied on to guide clinical practice or health-related behavior and should not be reported in news media as established information. medRxiv is for the distribution of preprints – complete but unpublished manuscripts – that describe human health research conducted, analyzed, and interpreted according to scientific principles…

Neonatal outcomes and indirect consequences following maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy: A systematic review
Sarah Sturrock, Shohaib Ali, Christopher Gale, Cheryl Battersby, Kirsty Le Doare
medRxiv 2022.05.20.22275313; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.20.22275313

BNT162b2 induces robust cross-variant SARS-CoV-2 immunity in children
Yannic C Bartsch, Jessica W Chen, Jaewon Kang, Madeline D Burns, Kerri J St.Denis, Maegan L Sheehan, Jameson P Davis, Alejandro B Balazs, Lael M Yonker, Galit Alter
medRxiv 2022.05.18.22275283; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.18.22275283

Estimating Vaccine-Preventable COVID-19 Deaths Under Counterfactual Vaccination Scenarios in the United States
Ming Zhong, Meghana Kshirsagar, Richard Johnston, Rahul Dodhia, Tammy Glazer, Allen Kim, Divya Michael, Sameer Nair-Desai, Thomas C Tsai, Stefanie Friedhoff, Juan M Lavista Ferres
medRxiv 2022.05.19.22275310; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.19.22275310

LEGAL AGE OF CONSENT FOR HIV TESTING AMONG ADOLESCENTS IN SUB SAHARAN AFRICA, A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
Getrud Joseph Mollel, Andrew Katende, Maryam Shahmanesh
medRxiv 2022.05.17.22275222; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.17.22275222

Parents’ intention to vaccinate their child for COVID-19: a cross-sectional survey (CoVAccS – wave 3)
Louise E Smith, Susan M Sherman, Julius Sim, Richard Amlot, Megan Cutts, Hannah Dasch, Nick Sevdalis, G James Rubin
medRxiv 2022.05.20.22275350; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.20.22275350

Covid-19 Vaccine Acceptance Among People Incarcerated in Connecticut State Jails
Margaret Lind, Byron S Kennedy, Murilo Dorion Nieto, Amy J Houde, Peri Sosensky, Ryan Borg, Derek A.T. Cummings, Albert Ko, Robert P Richeson
medRxiv 2022.05.19.22275339; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.19.22275339

How Should COVID-19 Vaccines be Distributed between the Global North and South? A Discrete Choice Experiment in Six European Countries
JI Steinert, H Sternberg, GA Veltri, T Büthe
medRxiv 2022.05.19.22275055; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.19.22275055

Real-world comparative effectiveness of mRNA-1273 and BNT162b2 vaccines among immunocompromised adults in the United States
Katherine E. Mues, Brenna Kirk, Deesha A. Patel, Alice Gelman, Scott Chavers, Carla Talarico, Daina B. Esposito, David Martin, James Mansi, Xing Chen, Nicolle M. Gatto, Nicolas Van de Velde
medRxiv 2022.05.13.22274960; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.13.22274960

10.4 Million Children Affected by COVID-19-associated Orphanhood and Caregiver Death: An Imperative for Action
Susan Hillis, Joel-Pascal Ntwali N’konzi, William Msemburi, Lucie Cluver, Andrés Villaveces, Seth Flaxman, H. Juliette T. Unwin
medRxiv 2022.05.08.22274788; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.08.22274788 Revision

United States’ political climates and the spread of SARS-2-COVID-19 during 2020
Felicia Pratto, Andrew Cortopassi, Natasza Marrouch
medRxiv 2022.05.16.22275162; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.16.22275162

 

Mapping publication outputs, collaboration networks, research hotspots, and most cited articles in systematic reviews and meta-analyses of medicine and health sciences in Ethiopia: analyses of 20 years of scientific data
Tesfa Dejenie Habtewold, Nigussie Tadesse Sharew, Aklilu Endalamaw, Henok Mulugeta, Getenet Dessie, Nigus G. Asefa, Getachew Mulu Kassa, Wubet Alebachew Bayih, Mulugeta Molla Birhanu, Balewgize Sileshi Tegegne, Andreas A. Teferra, Abera Kenay Tura, Sisay Mulugeta Alemu
medRxiv 2022.02.24.22271416; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.02.24.22271416 Revision

The effects on clinical trial activity of direct funding and taxation policy interventions made by government: a systematic review
Sam Crosby, Esther Rajadurai, Stephen Jan, Bruce Neal, Richard Holden
medRxiv 2022.05.13.22275062; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.13.22275062

Social clustering of unvaccinated children: measles-mumps-rubella vaccination coverage in schools in the Netherlands
Don Klinkenberg, Albert Jan van Hoek, Irene Veldhuijzen, Susan Hahné, Jacco Wallinga
medRxiv 2022.05.12.22273875; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.12.22273875

Wellcome Open Research [to 21 May 2022]
https://wellcomeopenresearch.org/browse/articles
[Accessed 21 May 2022]

 

Research Article metrics AWAITING PEER REVIEW
Assessing the impact of COVID-19 on STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) researchers in India [version 1; peer review: awaiting peer review]
Nikita Mehta, Vedika Inamdar, Arathy Puthillam, Shivani Chunekar, Hansika Kapoor, Anirudh Tagat, Deepa Subramanyam
Peer Reviewers Invited
Funder
The Wellcome Trust DBT India Alliance
PUBLISHED 20 May 2022

Study Protocol metrics AWAITING PEER REVIEW
The safety and immunogenicity of a combined pertussis containing vaccine Tdap for HIV infected pregnant women and their newborns (WoMANPOWER) – A study protocol for a randomized clinical trial [version 1; peer review: awaiting peer review]
Eve Nakabembe, Bahaa Abu-Raya, Mary Kyohere, Valerie Tusubira, Alexander Amone, Lydia Nakibuuka, Madeleine Cochet, Annettee Nakimuli, Merryn Voysey, Andrew Gorringe, Paul T. Heath, Philippa Musoke, Nick Andrews, Musa Sekikubo, Manish Sadarangani, Kirsty Le Doare
Peer Reviewers Invited
Funders
Wellcome
National Institute for Health Research
Department for International Development
Medical Research Council
Canadian Institutes of Health Research
PUBLISHED 17 May 2022

Think Tanks

Think Tanks
 
 
Brookings [to 21 May 2022]
http://www.brookings.edu/
Accessed 21 May 2022
Latest Research
[No new digest content identified]
 
 
Center for Global Development [to 21 May 2022]
https://www.cgdev.org/
Research [Selected]
[No new digest content identified]
 
 
Chatham House [to 21 May 2022]
https://www.chathamhouse.org/
Accessed 21 May 2022
[No new digest content identified]
 
 
CSIS [to 21 May 2022]
https://www.csis.org/
Accessed 21 May 2022
Podcast Episode
North Korea: A Covid-19 Disaster Unlike Any Other
May 20, 2022 | By J. Stephen Morrison, H. Andrew Schwartz, Victor Cha

Transcript
Book Event: Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla’s “Moonshot: Inside Pfizer’s Nine-Month Race to Make the Impossible Possible”
May 19, 2022
was thinking that I did the vaccine . Actually, I was part of … produce what they did with the vaccine . So it is – we have plenty … made a decision early in the vaccine development process not to …

 
 
Kaiser Family Foundation
https://www.kff.org/search/?post_type=press-release
Accessed 21 May 2022
May 16, 2022 News Release
COVID-19 Vaccination Rates Among Nursing Home Staff Have Risen by 25 Percentage Points Since the Biden Administration Announced a Vaccination Mandate for Health Care Workers Last Year
In a new analysis, KFF researchers find that COVID-19 vaccination rates among nursing home staff increased by 25 percentage points nationally (63% to 88%) from when the Biden administration announced the vaccine mandate for health care workers in August 2021 to after vaccination deadlines passed in March 2022. Researchers analyzed…
 
 
ODI [Overseas Development Institute] [to 21 May 2022]
https://odi.org/en/publications/
Publications
Accessed 21 May 2022
[No new digest content identified]
 
 
Rand [to 21 May 2022]
https://www.rand.org/pubs.html
Reports, Selected Journal Articles
Journal Article
Protecting the Mental and Physical Well-Being of Frontline Health Care Workers During COVID-19: Study Protocol of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial
The COVID-19 pandemic has placed health care workers at unprecedented risk of stress, burnout, and moral injury. This paper describes the design of an ongoing cluster randomized controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of Stress First Aid (SFA) to Usual Care (UC) in protecting the well-being of frontline health care workers.
May 17, 2022
Lu Dong, Lisa S. Meredith, Carrie M. Farmer, Sangeeta C. Ahluwalia, Peggy G. Chen, Kathryn E. Bouskill, Bing Han, Nabeel Qureshi, Sarah Dalton, Patricia J. Watson, Jonathan N. Tobin, Andrea Cassells, Courtney A. Gidengil
 
 
Urban Institute [to 21 May 2022]
https://www.urban.org/publications
Research Publications
[No new digest content identified]

Vaccines and Global Health: The Week in Review :: 14 May 2022

Vaccines and Global Health: The Week in Review is a weekly digest  summarizing news, events, announcements, peer-reviewed articles and research in the global vaccine ethics and policy space. Content is aggregated from key governmental, NGO, international organization and industry sources, key peer-reviewed journals, and other media channels. This summary proceeds from the broad base of themes and issues monitored by the Center for Vaccine Ethics & Policy in its work: it is not intended to be exhaustive in its coverage. You are viewing the blog version of our weekly digest, typically comprised of between 30 and 40 posts below all dated with the current issue date

.– Request an Email Summary: Vaccines and Global Health : The Week in Review is published as a single email summary, scheduled for release each Saturday evening before midnight (EDT in the U.S.). If you would like to receive the email version, please send your request to david.r.curry@centerforvaccineethicsandpolicy.org.

– pdf version A pdf of the current issue is available here:

– blog edition: comprised of the approx. 35+ entries posted below.

– Twitter:  Readers can also follow developments on twitter: @vaxethicspolicy.
.
– Links:  We endeavor to test each link as we incorporate it into any post, but recognize that some links may become “stale” as publications and websites reorganize content over time. We apologize in advance for any links that may not be operative. We believe the contextual information in a given post should allow retrieval, but please contact us as above for assistance if necessary.

Support this knowledge-sharing service: Your financial support helps us cover our costs and to address a current shortfall in our annual operating budget. Click here to donate and thank you in advance for your contribution.

.
David R. Curry, MS
Executive Director
Center for Vaccine Ethics and Policy

Second Global COVID-19 Summit

Second Global COVID-19 Summit

2nd COVID-⁠19 Co-Host Statement
May 12, 2022 The White House – Statements and Releases
Maintaining the momentum for pandemic response and Prioritizing Preparedness

On May 12, under the leadership of the United States, Belize, Germany, Indonesia, and Senegal, global leaders from across the world’s economies, civil society, and the private sector gathered for the 2nd Global COVID-19 Summit.  Summit participants made major new policy and financial commitments to make vaccines available to those at highest risk, to expand access to tests and treatments, and to prevent future health crises.  These are linked here.  Success in these areas is achievable, but it is not inevitable; leaders reinforced the value of whole-of-government and whole-of-society approaches to bring the acute phase of COVID-19 to an end, and the importance of being  prepared for future pandemic threats. The Summit was focused on preventing complacency, recognizing the pandemic is not over; protecting the most vulnerable, including the elderly, immunocompromised people, and frontline and health workers; and preventing future health crises, recognizing now is the time to secure political and financial commitment for pandemic preparedness.

The Summit catalyzed bold commitments.  Financially, leaders committed to provide $3.2 billion in new funding – additional to previous 2022 pledges, while acknowledging the need is still great.  This includes nearly $2.5 billion for COVID-19 and related response activities and $712 million in new commitments toward a new pandemic preparedness and global health security fund at the World Bank. (Note: This builds on $250 million previously pledged for this fund.) These funds will accelerate access to vaccinations, testing, and treatments, and they will contribute to a new pandemic preparedness and global health security fund housed at the World Bank.

Leaders also made robust national commitments to expand and accelerate vaccine coverage, in particular for their at-risk populations; to expand access to testing and treatments; to protect and support the health workforce and increase domestic budgets for health systems strengthening; and to advance health security, including through the new fund.

 

World leaders identified three major Summit outcomes.
:: Prioritizing the highest risk populations to save lives.  First, great progress has been made in fighting COVID-19, but the pandemic is not over and the next health crisis can strike at any time – likely while the world is still battling COVID-19.  Summit participants committed to double down on their collective efforts to control COVID-19, and we will enhance our focus on the highest risk populations, including the elderly, the immunocompromised, and healthcare and frontline workers – so that SARS-CoV-2 becomes a manageable respiratory pathogen everywhere.

Expanding access to countermeasures– for COVID-19 and future threats. Second, the pandemic has led to major advances in developing and delivering life-saving vaccines, tests, treatments, personal protective equipment, and other supplies.  Participants especially expressed support for the ACT-Accelerator, as the multilateral mechanism deploying these needed supplies. And yet, the pandemic also underscored major longstanding inequities in access to new countermeasures, especially for low- and lower middle-income countries.  Summit participants committed to finding sustainable and predictable solutions for early warning systems and to developing a cohesive global roadmap for local and regional access to medical countermeasures, personal protective equipment, and other lifesaving supplies for potentially pandemic diseases, as well as expanding access to manufacturing and research, including the concept of regional hubs for pandemic preparedness and response around the world.

Maintaining the momentum for pandemic response and prioritizing preparedness.  Finally, no country was fully prepared for the COVID-19 pandemic.  As a result, over 6 million people around the world have lost their lives, trillions of dollars have been lost from the global economy, and gains in global health and towards the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been reversed.  Summit participants committed to maintain the political will needed to establish national, regional, and global capacity for health security and pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response, including for training a strong network of experts to ensure readiness for future outbreaks with pandemic potential.  They supported the efforts of the G20 and other partners to establish a pandemic preparedness and global health security fund housed at the World Bank, working in close cooperation with WHO, and they committed to support locally-led solutions to expand and protect the health workforce and minimize disruptions to routine and essential health services…

 

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2nd Global COVID-⁠19 Summit Commitments
May 12, 2022
Specific commitments made by approximately 48 regional governance bodies and nation states, as well as 50+ NGOs, private sector organizations and philanthropies, are listed here. We highlight selected announcements below:

 

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Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Commits up to US$125 Million to Help End the Acute Phase of COVID-19 and Prevent the Next Pandemic
WASHINGTON, D.C., and SEATTLE (May 12, 2022) – Today, Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, announced a new financial commitment of up to US$125 million to help end the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic and prepare for future pandemics. In remarks made remotely at the Global COVID-19 Summit, Gates said the new funding will go toward strengthening health systems in low-income countries, enhancing integrated disease monitoring, expanding access to pandemic tools, and helping countries manage COVID-19 alongside other pressing health needs.
…“The world was not ready for this pandemic, but we know how to prevent the next one,” said Melinda French Gates, co-chair of the Gates Foundation. “Every sector has a role to play in achieving global health security, and the foundation is calling on countries and other funders to make the investments needed to create a safer, more equitable world.”
Strong disease surveillance systems are critical to effectively identifying and monitoring the spread of emerging infectious diseases. As part of this new commitment, the foundation will fund the advancement of global, regional, and country-level integrated disease surveillance to ensure that all countries—particularly low- and middle-income countries—have the core capabilities to respond faster and more effectively to the next pandemic threat.
The new funding will also help build the capacity of vaccine manufacturers in low- and middle-income countries to accelerate the development and equitable delivery of safe and effective vaccines, treatments, and diagnostics in the event of a future pandemic. This will, in turn, help countries improve their capacity to address endemic infectious diseases and respond to emerging pathogens.
The Gates Foundation has long supported vaccine manufacturers—in both the public and private sectors—in countries such as India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, South Africa, and Brazil. The unique capacity of these manufacturers to produce life-saving vaccines on a large scale has dramatically improved health around the world by addressing a range of diseases, including meningitis A, rotavirus, and now COVID-19.
The new funding will help address access barriers to innovations such as mRNA vaccines in low- and middle-income countries. Tt will also support ongoing foundation investments in strengthening health systems and global health security, which are part of the foundation’s longstanding commitment to improving health equity.
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DFC financing up to US$ 1 billion for Gavi COVID-19 vaccine and ancillary supply purchase and delivery
Announced at the White House COVID-19 Summit, the new COVAX Rapid Financing Facility will provide access to funding that the COVAX AMC needs to respond to unforeseen risks.
This innovative financing facility will allow Gavi to monetize COVAX AMC pledges soon after sovereign and private sector donors make them for more immediate and impactful response times.
DFC’s investment is its largest-ever healthcare project and contributes to the Corporation’s Global Health and Prosperity Initiative, which supports the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic and strengthening health resilience in developing countries.

Washington / Geneva, 12 May 2022 – The White House today announced that US International Development Finance Corporation (DFC) and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance have partnered to create the COVAX Rapid Financing Facility, which will provide up to US$ 1 billion to accelerate COVID-19 vaccine and ancillary supply purchase and delivery on behalf of developing countries participating in the COVAX Advance Market Commitment (COVAX AMC).

The aim of this new innovative financing instrument is to allow Gavi to monetize sovereign and private sector pledges to the COVAX AMC and consequently maximize impact by minimizing waiting time for the funding. This tool will give the COVAX AMC additional liquidity to support the availability of COVID-19 vaccines, including variant-adapted doses, in response to risks and shocks, and it will enable COVAX to act quickly to secure access to extra doses.

“DFC’s US$ 1 billion investment will accelerate COVID-19 vaccine availability for less-developed countries around the world,” said DFC CEO Scott Nathan. “DFC’s strong partnership with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance advances the Biden-Harris Administration’s effort to ensure more countries can acquire safe, reliable vaccines to advance the end of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

“We are grateful to DFC and the US Government for this important new financing tool, which will speed the availability of funding COVAX needs to close the still-stubborn COVID vaccine equity gap,” said Dr Seth Berkley, CEO of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, which manages the COVAX Facility. “With this new tool, COVAX can better respond to the next twist and turn of the pandemic and manage risks that countries can’t face alone.”

 

The COVAX Rapid Financing Facility is particularly useful to donors who, due to budgetary or other considerations, wish to make payment to Gavi over the next four years.  

…Pending the finalization of an agreement between DFC and Gavi, the US$ 1 billion facility will strengthen COVAX’s capacity to provide many countries access to safe, reliable COVID-19 vaccines to help improve health conditions and boost economic recovery in the wake of the pandemic.

DFC’s investment is its largest-ever healthcare project and contributes to the Corporation’s Global Health and Prosperity Initiative, which supports the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic and strengthening health resilience in developing countries. Through the initiative, DFC is working to catalyze US$ 5 billion in projects that bolster health systems, support infrastructure development, and expand access to clean water, sanitation, and nutrition.

 

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NIH Licenses COVID-19 Research Tools and Early-Stage Technologies to WHO Program
May 12, 2022 | News Release
Today at the second Global COVID-19 Summit, President Biden announced that the Biden-Harris administration, through the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), has licensed 11 COVID-19 research tools and early-stage vaccine and diagnostic candidates to the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) through the World Health Organization’s COVID-19 Technology Access Pool (C-TAP). The licenses will allow manufacturers from all around the world to work with MPP and C-TAP to use these technologies for the potential development of COVID-19 vaccines, treatments, and diagnostics to benefit people living in low- and middle-income countries. Included in the technologies licensed is the SARS-CoV-2 stabilized spike protein—a patented invention included in multiple COVID-19 vaccines.

C-TAP aims to boost global supply of vaccines, treatments, and diagnostics for COVID-19 by facilitating the sharing of intellectual property, knowledge, and data with quality-assured manufacturers that have capacity to scale up production. NIH scientists regularly make discoveries—both patented and unpatented—that can be transferred to the private sector for further research and development and eventual commercialization. While NIH has already granted nonexclusive licenses to companies for use of the SARS-CoV-2 stabilized spike protein, making this and other technologies available through C-TAP will facilitate even wider access.

“Controlling COVID-19 globally and addressing future public health threats is only possible if all communities, including the most vulnerable, have access to lifesaving treatments, vaccines and diagnostics,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra. “Sharing our scientific knowledge and health technologies with C-TAP to foster the development of crucial medical countermeasures is another step we are taking to assist our global partners in our shared fight against this devastating disease.”

“NIH scientists have developed innovative COVID-19 research tools, vaccines and diagnostics. While NIH cannot commercialize these early-stage technologies, we can share our knowledge wherever feasible to support our global partners,” said Acting NIH Director Lawrence A. Tabak, D.D.S. “NIH’s contributions to C-TAP provide a piece of the technology puzzle to help global manufacturers advance development of COVID-19 diagnostics, vaccines and treatments. I hope NIH’s actions will inspire other rights holders to do the same.”

 

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At Second Global COVID-19 Summit, USAID Announces $220 Million Commitment to Prevent Future Pandemics and Test and Treat Against COVID-19
May 12, 2022
Today, at the second Global COVID-19 Summit, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) announced new efforts to prevent future pandemics and pilot a lifesaving test and treat strategy, as part of USAID’s ongoing leadership to end the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic and advance global health security.

 

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Global Fund, United States and Unitaid Launch “Test-and-Treat” Programs at Second Global COVID-⁠19 Summit
12 May 2022
GENEVA, WASHINGTON – The Global Fund, the United States and Unitaid, together with FIND and other ACT-Accelerator partners, are launching over US$120 million in support to countries for test-and-treat programs to prevent hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 for those most at risk in low- and middle-income countries. The announcement was made at the Second Global COVID-⁠19 Summit, which placed an emphasis on supporting locally led solutions to both immediate and long-term challenges, including the deployment of tests and treatments, especially for the highest-risk populations.

Test-and-treat programs will save lives, reduce global inequities in access to COVID-19 testing and treatment, help strengthen formal and community systems for health in low- and middle-income countries, protect front-line health workers, and mitigate the knock-on impact of COVID-19 on programs to fight HIV, TB and malaria.

The Global Fund will procure up to US$80 million in COVID-19 rapid test kits and oral antiviral drugs, and USAID will provide US$20 million in technical assistance for piloting test-and-treat fast-paced implementation in eight countriesUnitaid will provide an additional US$22 million to expand and accelerate the introduction of new treatments through the ongoing Unitaid–FIND early-adoption test-and-treat programs launched in late 2021. These combined investments of US$122 million will support test-and-treat implementation in over 20 low- and middle-income countries globally…

“This new co-investment is a critical step toward equitable access to optimal treatment alongside adequate tests for those at high risk of developing severe or critical COVID-19 in low-resource settings,” said Unitaid Executive Director Dr. Philippe Duneton. “We now have treatment options that can prevent hospitalizations and deaths and will be key in the response to the pandemic. Supporting countries in securing access for these emerging options, as well as their deployment in the most effective way, is our priority.”

 

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Official Summit Announcements

Remarks by President Biden at the Global COVID-⁠19 Summit
May 12, 2022 • Speeches and Remarks

2nd COVID-⁠19 Co-Host Statement
May 12, 2022 • Statements and Releases

Background Press Call by Senior Administration Official Previewing the Second Global COVID Summit
May 12, 2022 • Press Briefings

Remarks by Vice President Harris at the Global Covid-19 Summit
May 12, 2022 • Speeches and Remarks

2nd Global COVID-⁠19 Summit Commitments
May 12, 2022 • Statements and Releases

U.S. FACT SHEET: The 2nd Global COVID-⁠19 Summit:
May 12, 2022 • Statements and Releases

Statement from President Biden and President von der Leyen on occasion of the second Global COVID-⁠19 Summit, May 12, 2022
May 12, 2022 • Statements and Releases

A Proclamation on Remembering the 1,000,000 Americans Lost to COVID-⁠19
May 12, 2022 • Presidential Actions

Statement from President Joe Biden Marking One Million American Lives Lost to COVID-⁠19
May 12, 2022 • Statements and Releases

Open Letter on ACT-A Therapeutics and Ongoing Roadblocks to Enhancing Access – IFPMA

COVID Perspectives

Open Letter on ACT-A Therapeutics and Ongoing Roadblocks to Enhancing Access – IFPMA
10 May 2022
[Text-bolding from original]
Dear ACT-A partners,
As a founding partner of ACT-A, we remain committed to the collective goal of enabling global and equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines, therapeutics and diagnostics. Two and a half years on, the world is very much still in the grip of COVID-19 and we share the concern of our global health partners that we must redouble our efforts in order to defeat this pandemic.

 

The biopharmaceutical industry has stepped up to the challenge and done everything possible to meet what has been asked of us on facilitating access to therapeutics.

Remarkable progress has been made in the fight against COVID-19 and this year particularly so on therapeutics. Antivirals can offer an important option for preventing severe illness, saving lives and preserving health system resources in the process. Our member companies have acted decisively early on by putting equitable access to antivirals at the top of our priorities.  We have signed voluntary licence agreements (bilaterally and through Medicines Patent Pool) along with enabling the transfer of technology to scale up sublicensees’ manufacturing capabilities. We have also engaged with ACT-A’s procurement partners to put in place timely supply agreements for several million treatment courses to reach LMICs, while also submitting for emergency and full regulatory approvals and WHO pre-qualification in record time. In amongst all this, our companies continue to adhere to tiered pricing as a guiding principle for access.

 

Despite these efforts, we remain concerned that COVID-19 treatments are unlikely to reach those who need them in a timely and efficient manner due to a number of issues, many of which rest with ACT-A. We anticipated these and raised them on multiple occasions to the ACT-A partners, charting as far back as midway through 2021. However, many of these issues today remain unresolved and if not dealt with promptly, run the risk of further exacerbating inequality of access to treatments.

Cognizant that ACT-A alone cannot fully address such issues, we call on global partners to work collaboratively with us to help overcome three main challenges: 

 

[1] Demand signals, forecasts and purchase requests from ACT-A have been late and significantly lower than expected. This impacts access.
We moved quickly to calls to deliver safe and effective antiviral therapeutics as soon as possible and at an affordable price. Yet, we have been surprised by the slow pace of concrete orders coming through the ACT-A Tx Pillar.
Outside of the ACT-A pillar, certain LMICs have moved forward of their own accord to procure millions of courses of antiviral treatment in the past several months. This undermines equity between those LMICs with the financial ability to procure bilaterally and those which will rely on the ACT-A system to support procurement.
Worryingly, demand in private markets supplied by generic manufacturers outside our members’ voluntary licensing networks with unknown quality-assurance risks creating even greater inequality in LMICs where the public sector has not yet provided access.
The procurement activities outside of ACT-A combined with the slow orders via ACT-A would suggest that roadblocks are occurring within the ACT-A system, and that countries have not been informed on how to access antivirals via ACT-A. These roadblocks are outside of our control and we urge that this be addressed as a priority.

 

[2] An allocation framework for therapeutics should have been designed and coordinated with partners early on. This impacts access.
Since June 2021, we have been calling for a clear allocation framework for therapeutics to be developed to provide guidance on how to ensure equity, knowing how important this would be for the manufacturers particularly when it was widely-known that volumes for some medicines would be limited in the early months of 2022.
We are still no clearer about the timelines for the allocation framework anticipated by ACT-A. Such a lack of transparency and ongoing delays in allocation, lack of global funding and clear signals of supranational demand have made it difficult for manufacturers to forecast the supply needed to meet the ACT-A demand volumes.
While manufacturers have set aside supply in the short-term to fulfil ACT-A procurement agreements that are now in place and they are now ready to ship product, the global health community to date has not provided a coordinated system for equitable access to antiviral treatments.
ACT-A should streamline the procurement process with manufacturers through a single contract approach in support of access, thereby avoiding protracted negotiations with individual ACT-A partners. The current process is challenging given ACT-A partners place different procedural demands on manufacturers and operate different General Terms and Conditions, leading to cumbersome legal negotiations and unnecessary delays.

 

[3] Country readiness risks slowing down treatment uptake. This impacts access.
While innovator companies and their licensees continue to ramp up manufacturing to supply the world, we remain concerned that local systems will not have the absorption capacity for the new therapeutics to be most impactful in curbing the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Effective scale up of antivirals requires: availability of diagnostics; clear communication to patients on how, where, and when to seek testing and treatment, and information to healthcare providers on the choice of which antiviral treatment option is most appropriate for which patient.
We have consistently expressed our concerns about the preparedness of countries to absorb these new medicines into their pandemic responses. While we understand that work is underway in ACT-A to accelerate and enhance improved access to COVID-19 diagnostics and treatment while continuing to build capacity for test-trace-isolate and treatment efforts, we believe more must be done and reiterate our offer to collaborate on this important aspect.

In conclusion, whilst we continue to develop and supply the needed medical innovations to respond to the pandemic and to enable equitable access to the new therapeutics, we wish to share our concerns that the ecosystem as it currently exists is not fit-for-purpose to ensure that patients have access to these treatments within the critical timeframes required, and not enough coordination seems to be in place to address identified access issues…