Journal Watch

Journal Watch

   Vaccines and Global Health: The Week in Review continues its weekly scanning of key peer-reviewed journals to identify and cite articles, commentary and editorials, books reviews and other content supporting our focus on vaccine ethics and policy. Journal Watch is not intended to be exhaustive, but indicative of themes and issues the Center is actively tracking. We selectively provide full text of some editorial and comment articles that are specifically relevant to our work. Successful access to some of the links provided may require subscription or other access arrangement unique to the publisher.

If you would like to suggest other journal titles to include in this service, please contact David Curry at: david.r.curry@centerforvaccineethicsandpolicy.org

Assessing the impact of health research on health policies: a study of the Dodowa Health Research Centre, Ghana

BMC Health Services Research
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmchealthservres/content
(Accessed 24 June 2017)

Research article
Assessing the impact of health research on health policies: a study of the Dodowa Health Research Centre, Ghana
The importance of assessing research impact is increasingly recognised. Ghana has a long tradition of research dating from the 1970s. In the Ghana Health Service there are three health research centres under t…
Blanca Escribano-Ferrer, Jayne Webster and Margaret Gyapong
BMC Health Services Research 2017 17:435
Published on: 24 June 2017

Comparative effectiveness research: what to do when experts disagree about risks

BMC Medical Ethics
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmedethics/content
(Accessed 24 June 2017)

Debate
Comparative effectiveness research: what to do when experts disagree about risks
Ethical issues related to comparative effectiveness research, or research that compares existing standards of care, have recently received considerable attention. In this paper we focus on how Ethics Review Committees (ERCs) should evaluate the risks of comparative effectiveness research.
Reidar K. Lie, Francis K.L. Chan, Christine Grady, Vincent H. Ng and David Wendler
BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:42
Published on: 19 June 2017

Bangladesh policy on prevention and control of non-communicable diseases: a policy analysis

BMC Public Health
http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles
(Accessed 24 June 2017)

Research article
Bangladesh policy on prevention and control of non-communicable diseases: a policy analysis
This paper is aimed at critically assessing the extent to which Non-Communicable Disease NCD-related policies introduced in Bangladesh align with the World Health Organization’s (WHO) 2013–2020 Action Plan for…
Tuhin Biswas, Sonia Pervin, Md. Imtiaz Alam Tanim, Louis Niessen and Anwar Islam
BMC Public Health 2017 17:582
Published on: 19 June 2017

Achieving sustainability in health information systems: a field tested measure of country ownership

Globalization and Health
http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/
[Accessed 24 June 2017]

Methodology
Achieving sustainability in health information systems: a field tested measure of country ownership
A country will trust, value, and use, its health information system (HIS) to the extent it has had a role in its creation and maintenance. A sense of ownership contributes in turn to the long-term sustainabili…
Stephanie Watson-Grant, Khou Xiong and James C Thomas
Globalization and Health 2017 13:36
Published on: 24 June 2017

New Leader, New Era: Five Building Blocks For A Reinvigorated World Health Organization

Health Affairs
June 2017; Volume 36, Issue 6
http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/current
Issue Focus: Pursuing Health Equity

[Reviewed earlier]

Blog
New Leader, New Era: Five Building Blocks For A Reinvigorated World Health Organization
19 June 2017
By Lawrence O. Gostin
The World Health Assembly’s election of Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus to serve as its 9th Director-General may be the most momentous in the Organization’s 70 years for reasons far beyond electing the first African. The World Health Organization (WHO) faces a crisis in confidence following its anemic response to Ebola. It remains caught in an unvirtuous cycle: Member State loss of trust results in a paucity of funding and the continual inability to perform. This is a moment to take stock of the new Director-General’s record and vision, as well as the reforms needed to transform WHO into the 21st century institution the world sorely needs…
…Guided by an unyielding insistence upon and institutionalization of human rights, demanding and developing mechanisms for WHO Secretariat and Member State accountability, and unwavering commitment to the public’s health over politics, Dr. Tedros could return WHO to global health leadership. Too much is at stake for him to do otherwise, while states and stakeholders must do everything possible to make his tenure a historic success.