Deliberate Indifference: Inadequate Health Care in U.S. Prisons

Annals of Internal Medicine
16 April 2019 Vol: 170, Issue 8
http://annals.org/aim/issue

Ideas and Opinions
Deliberate Indifference: Inadequate Health Care in U.S. Prisons
Ashley Hurst, JD, MDiv, MA; Brenda Castañeda, JD; Erika Ramsdale, MD
Whether health care should be a fundamental right in the United States is an ongoing debate. However, one group—incarcerated persons—has a constitutionally protected right to adequate health care. Nevertheless, there is a growing epidemic of inadequate health care in U.S. prisons. Shrinking prison budgets, a prison population that is the highest in the world, and for-profit health care contracts all contribute to this epidemic. The medical community has an obligation to respond by providing and advocating for adequate health care for incarcerated persons.

Healthcare professionals’ knowledge, attitude and acceptance of influenza vaccination in Saudi Arabia: a multicenter cross-sectional study

BMC Health Services Research
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmchealthservres/content
(Accessed 20 Apr 2019)

Research article
Healthcare professionals’ knowledge, attitude and acceptance of influenza vaccination in Saudi Arabia: a multicenter cross-sectional study
All healthcare professionals (HCPs) are at high risk of influenza infection. Therefore, immunization is recommended for all HCPs. Due to safety and effectiveness concerns, HCPs have a low vaccination rate. Thi
Authors: Thamir M. Alshammari, Kazeem B. Yusuff, Muhammad Majid Aziz and Gehad M. Subaie
Citation: BMC Health Services Research 2019 19:229
Published on: 15 April 2019

 

The usefulness and acceptability of a personal health record to children and young people living with a complex health condition: A realist review of the literature

Child Care, Health and Development
Volume 45, Issue 3  Pages: 313-472  May 2019
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/13652214/current

REVIEW ARTICLES  Open Access
The usefulness and acceptability of a personal health record to children and young people living with a complex health condition: A realist review of the literature
 There are a growing number of children and young people (CYP) with chronic health needs or complex disabilities. Increasingly, CYP with life‐limiting or life‐threatening conditions are surviving into adulthood. Communication between CYP, their family, and health professionals can be challenging. The use of a personal health record (PHR) is one potential strategy for improving communication by promoting CYP’s health advocacy skills. However, PHR implementation has proved difficult due to technical, organisational, and professional barriers. The aim of this realist review is to identify the factors, which help or hinder the use of PHRs with CYP living with a complex health condition.
Janet Diffin, Bronagh Byrne, Helen Kerr, Jayne Price, Aine Abbott, Dorry McLaughlin, Peter O’Halloran
Pages: 313-332
First Published: 28 February 2019

How are evidence generation partnerships between researchers and policy-makers enacted in practice? A qualitative interview study

Health Research Policy and Systems
http://www.health-policy-systems.com/content
[Accessed 20 Apr 2019]

Research
|   15 April 2019
How are evidence generation partnerships between researchers and policy-makers enacted in practice? A qualitative interview study
Evidence generation partnerships between researchers and policy-makers are a potential method for producing more relevant research with greater potential to impact on policy and practice. Little is known about how such partnerships are enacted in practice, however, or how to increase their effectiveness. We aimed to determine why researchers and policy-makers choose to work together, how they work together, which partnership models are most common, and what the key (1) relationship-based and (2) practical components of successful research partnerships are.
Authors: Anna Williamson, Hannah Tait, Fadi El Jardali, Luke Wolfenden, Sarah Thackway, Jessica Stewart, Lyndal O’Leary and Julie Dixon

 

Health and immunisation services for the urban poor in selected countries of Asia

Infectious Diseases of Poverty
http://www.idpjournal.com/content
[Accessed 20 Apr 2019]

Commentary
|   18 April 2019
Health and immunisation services for the urban poor in selected countries of Asia
Asia is a region that is rapidly urbanising. While overall urban health is above rural health standards, there are also pockets of deep health and social disadvantage within urban slum and peri-urban areas that represent increased public health risk. With a focus on vaccine preventable disease and immunisation coverage, this commentary describes and analyses strengths and weaknesses of existing urban health and immunisation strategy, with a view to recommending strategic directions for improving access to immunisation and related maternal and child health services in urban areas across the region. The themes discussed in this commentary are based on the findings of country case studies published by the United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF)  on the topic of immunisation and related health services for the urban poor in Cambodia, Indonesia, Mongolia, Myanmar, the Philippines, and Vietnam.
Authors: John Grundy, Xiaojun Wang, Kunihiko Chris Hirabayashi, Richard Duncan, Dexter Bersonda, Abu Obeida Eltayeb, Godwin Mindra and Robin Nandy

Tuberculosis and integrated child health — Rediscovering the principles of Alma Ata

International Journal of Infectious Diseases
March 2019 Volume 80, Supplement, S1-S84
https://www.ijidonline.com/issue/S1201-9712(19)X0005-3

Articles
Tuberculosis and integrated child health — Rediscovering the principles of Alma Ata
Anne K. Detjen, Shaffiq Essajee, Malgorzata Grzemska, Ben J. Marais
S9–S12
Published online: February 27, 2019
Highlights
:: The renewed commitment to Primary Health Care (PHC) presents an opportunity to reconsider latent synergies and novel partnerships for child health and development.
:: TB and HIV partners need to align better and jointly formulate strategies to scale up pediatric TB and HIV in an integrated MNCH and PHC context.
:: Integrated, family-centered approaches, implemented at the community and primary care facility level are key for bridging the pediatric TB and HIV gaps.