Opinion: Technology innovation for infectious diseases in the developing world

Infectious Diseases of Poverty
2012, 1
http://www.idpjournal.com/content
[Accessed 27 October 2012]
Aims & scope
Infectious Diseases of Poverty is an open access, peer-reviewed journal publishing topic areas and methods that address essential public health questions relating to infectious diseases of poverty. These include various aspects of the biology of pathogens and vectors, diagnosis and detection, treatment and case management, epidemiology and modeling, zoonotic hosts and animal reservoirs, control strategies and implementation, new technologies and application. Transdisciplinary or multisectoral effects on health systems, ecohealth, environmental management, and innovative technology are also considered.

IDP aims to identify and assess research and information gaps that hinder progress towards new interventions for a particular public health problem in the developing world. Moreover, to provide a platform for discussion of the issues raised, in order to advance research and evidence building for improved public health interventions in poor settings.

Opinion  
Technology innovation for infectious diseases in the developing world
Anthony D So, Quentin Ruiz-Esparza Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2012, 1:2 (25 October 2012)

Abstract [Open Access]
Enabling innovation and access to health technologies remains a key strategy in combating infectious diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, a gulf between paying markets and the endemicity of such diseases has contributed to the dearth of R&D in meeting these public health needs. While the pharmaceutical industry views emerging economies as potential new markets, most of the world’s poorest bottom billion now reside in middle-income countries–a fact that has complicated tiered access arrangements. However, product development partnerships–particularly those involving academic institutions and small firms–find commercial opportunities in pursuing even neglected diseases; and a growing pharmaceutical sector in BRICS countries offers hope for an indigenous base of innovation. Such innovation will be shaped by 1) access to building blocks of knowledge; 2) strategic use of intellectual property and innovative financing to meet public health goals; 3) collaborative norms of open innovation; and 4) alternative business models, some with a double bottom line. Facing such resource constraints, LMICs are poised to develop a new, more resource-effective model of innovation that holds exciting promise in meeting the needs of global health.