CDC/ACIP [to 27 January 2018]

CDC/ACIP [to 27 January 2018]

http://www.cdc.gov/media/index.html
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/index.html
Friday, January 26, 2018
CDC Update on Widespread Flu Activity – Transcript
… . It has been a tough flu season so far this year. And while flu activity is beginning to go down in parts of the country, it remains high for most the U.S., with some areas still rising. Most people with influenza are being infected with the H3N2 influenza virus. And in seasons where H3N2 is the main cause of influenza, we see more cases, more visits to the doctor, more hospitalizations, and more deaths, especially among older people. This season now looking like the 2014-15 season where H3N2 predominated. In that season, was categorized as a high severity season..

Thursday, January 25, 2018
More birth defects seen in parts of U.S. with local Zika spread – Press Release
Birth defects most strongly linked to Zika virus infection during pregnancy have increased in parts of the United States that have had local Zika virus transmission, according to a report in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Areas with local transmission of Zika – southern Florida, a portion of south Texas, and Puerto Rico – saw a 21 percent increase in births with outcomes most strongly linked to Zika virus in the last half of 2016 compared with births in the first half of that year…
 
MMWR News Synopsis for January 25, 2018
Population-Based Surveillance of Birth Defects Potentially Related to Zika Virus Infection – 15 States and U.S. Territories
Zika remains a threat to mothers and babies in the United States. Though the relationship between the increase in birth defects in certain areas and local Zika virus transmission has not been confirmed, this increase highlights the critical need for strong and rapid public health surveillance systems to identify babies with birth defects. About 3 out of every 1,000 babies born in 15 U.S. states and territories in 2016 had a birth defect meeting the case definition for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Areas with local Zika virus transmission in the U.S. had a 21 percent increase in the birth defects most strongly linked to Zika virus infection during pregnancy in the last half of 2016 compared with the first half. It is not known if this increase is due to local transmission of Zika virus alone, or if there are other contributing factors. These findings underscore the importance of surveillance for early identification of birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection and the need for continued monitoring in areas at risk for Zika.

Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Use of Herpes Zoster Vaccines
Vaccination is our best tool to prevent shingles, and Shingrix® is now the preferred shingles vaccine. Every year in the U.S., about 1 million people get shingles – and the vast majority are older than 50. On October 25, 2017, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted that the Shingrix® vaccine is the preferred vaccine to prevent shingles. This new vaccine is more than 90 percent effective, even among the elderly, and maintained high protection during the four years of clinical trials. Previously, Zostavax® had been the only vaccine for seniors to prevent shingles. For adults 60 years and older, Zostavax is about 51 percent effective in preventing shingles. Zostavax is less protective in the elderly and protection wanes over time. Shingrix is now recommended as the preferred vaccine to prevent shingles for adults 50 and older. Eligible adults should get Shingrix even if they previously received Zostavax.