From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

Nature Human Behaviour 
1, 873–880 (2017)
Letter
Association of moral values with vaccine hesitancy
Avnika B. Amin, Robert A. Bednarczyk, […] Saad B. Omer
Abstract
Clusters of unvaccinated children are particularly susceptible to outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease1,2. Existing messaging interventions demonstrate short-term success, but some may backfire and worsen vaccine hesitancy3. Values-based messages appeal to core morality, which influences the attitudes individuals then have on topics like vaccination4,5,6,7. We must understand how underlying morals, not just attitudes, differ by hesitancy type to develop interventions that work with individual values. Here, we show in two correlational studies that harm and fairness foundations are not significantly associated with vaccine hesitancy, but purity and liberty foundations are. We found that medium-hesitancy parents were twice as likely as low-hesitancy parents to highly emphasize purity (adjusted odds ratio: 2.08; 95% confidence interval: 1.27–3.40). High-hesitancy respondents were twice as likely to strongly emphasize purity (adjusted odds ratio: 2.15; 95% confidence interval: 1.39–3.31) and liberty (adjusted odds ratio: 2.19; 95% confidence interval: 1.50–3.21). Our results demonstrate that endorsement of harm and fairness—ideas often emphasized in traditional vaccine-focused messages—are not predictive of vaccine hesitancy. This, combined with significant associations of purity and liberty with hesitancy, indicates a need for inclusion of broader themes in vaccine discussions. These findings have the potential for application to other health decisions and communications as well.

International Journal of Current Research
Vol. 9, Issue, 07, pp.xxxxxxx, July, 2017
RESEARCH ARTICLE
A STUDY TO ASSESS THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PLANNED TEACHING PROGRAM ON KNOWLEDGE OF IMMUNIZATION AMONG MIGRANT MOTHERS OF UNDER FIVE CHILDREN IN SELECTED CONSTRUCTION SITES AT BANGALORE URBAN
1, *Juliet Tharani, 1Deepa S. Nair and 2Karthika, S.
1Department of Community Health Nursing, SEA College of Nursing, Bangalore, Karnataka, India  2Department of Community Health Nursing, MMCON, MMU, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana, India
ABSTRACT
Prevention of disease is one of the most important goals in child care. For this reason a national effort is being made towards improving the immunization of all the children. Migrant laborers themselves avail the curative care but they fall outside the coverage of preventive care largely due to their movement of work caused by uncertainty of employment. The immunization status of migrant children is poorly understood, as they have less access to health care services. The researcher felt that assessing the knowledge on immunization and teaching them on the importance of immunization would bring about a positive attitudinal change among the migrant mothers to immunize their children regularly.
 
 
Infection and Immunity
Accepted Manuscript Posted Online 4 December 2017
Toward Tuberculosis Vaccine Development: Recommendations for NHP Study Design
Dominick J. Laddy1, Aurelio Bonavia2, Willem A. Hanekom3, Deepak Kaushal4, Ann
4 Williams5, Mario Roederer6, Robert A. Seder6, Sally Sharpe5, Frank A.W. Verreck7,
5 Patricia A. Darrah6 –
ABSTRACT
Clinical trials of novel tuberculosis vaccines are expensive, while global resources for TB vaccine development are limited. There is therefore a need for robust and predictive pre-clinical data to support advancement of candidate vaccines into clinical trials. Here, we provide a rationale for using the nonhuman primate as an essential component of these efforts, as well as guidance to the TB community for standardizing experimental design and aligning endpoints to facilitate development of new TB vaccines.