Overvaluing individual consent ignores risks to tribal participants

Nature Reviews Genetics
Volume 20 Issue 9, September 2019
https://www.nature.com/nrg/volumes/20/issues/9

 

Comment | 15 July 2019
Overvaluing individual consent ignores risks to tribal participants
Genomic studies often rely on individual-based consent approaches for tribal members residing outside of their communities. Tsosie et al. argue that this consent model fails to acknowledge the risks to small groups such as tribes, which can implicate the community as a whole.
Krystal S. Tsosie, Joseph M. Yracheta & Donna Dickenson

Making the case for more inclusive GWAS

Nature Reviews Genetics
Volume 20 Issue 9, September 2019
https://www.nature.com/nrg/volumes/20/issues/9

 

Research Highlight | 10 July 2019
Making the case for more inclusive GWAS
A study in Nature emphasizes that the diversity of genetic ancestries represented by large-scale genomic studies needs to be increased in order to ensure that their findings — and any resulting advances in health care — are relevant to everyone, regardless of ethnicity.
Dorothy Clyde

Genomics of disease risk in globally diverse populations

Nature Reviews Genetics
Volume 20 Issue 9, September 2019
https://www.nature.com/nrg/volumes/20/issues/9

 

Review Article | 24 June 2019
Genomics of disease risk in globally diverse populations
Global genomic diversity can provide new opportunities for discovery and translation into therapies, as well as a better understanding of population disease risks. This Review considers the value of examining diverse populations to better understand genetic contributors to disease risk and trait variation.
Deepti Gurdasani, Inês Barroso[…]  & Manjinder S. Sandhu

Predicting vaccine effectiveness in livestock populations: A theoretical framework applied to PRRS virus infections in pigs

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 31 Aug 2019]

 

Research Article
Predicting vaccine effectiveness in livestock populations: A theoretical framework applied to PRRS virus infections in pigs
Vasiliki Bitsouni, Samantha Lycett, Tanja Opriessnig, Andrea Doeschl-Wilson
Research Article | published 30 Aug 2019 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0220738

Delayed second dose of oral cholera vaccine administered before high-risk period for cholera transmission: Cholera control strategy in Lusaka, 2016

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 31 Aug 2019]

 

Delayed second dose of oral cholera vaccine administered before high-risk period for cholera transmission: Cholera control strategy in Lusaka, 2016
Eva Ferreras, Belem Matapo, Elizabeth Chizema-Kawesha, Orbrie Chewe, Hannah Mzyece, Alexandre Blake, Loveness Moonde, Gideon Zulu, Marc Poncin, Nyambe Sinyange, Nancy Kasese-Chanda, Caroline Phiri, Kennedy Malama, Victor Mukonka, Sandra Cohuet, Florent Uzzeni, Iza Ciglenecki, M. Carolina Danovaro-Holliday, Francisco J. Luquero, Lorenzo Pezzoli
Research Article | published 30 Aug 2019 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0219040

The effect of trust and proximity on vaccine propensity

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 31 Aug 2019]

 

The effect of trust and proximity on vaccine propensity
Florian Justwan, Bert Baumgaertner, Juliet E. Carlisle, Emma Carson, Jordan Kizer
Research Article | published 28 Aug 2019 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0220658
Abstract
The main goal of this paper is to study the effects of (1) trust in government medical experts and (2) proximity to a recent disease outbreak on vaccine propensity. More specifically, we explore how these variables affect attitudes with regards to measles. Using original survey data, collected in January/February 2017, we obtain three main empirical findings. First, contrary to our expectations, an individual’s proximity to a recent measles outbreak has no independent effect on vaccination attitudes. Second, corroborating previous studies in the field, we find that trust in institutions such as the CDC has a positive effect on our dependent variable. Third, there is a significant interactive relationship between proximity and trust in governmental medical experts. While distance from a previous measles outbreak has no effect on vaccination attitudes for respondents with medium or high levels of trust, the variable exerts a negative effect for subjects with little confidence in government medical experts. In other words: low-trust individuals who live farther away from a recent measles outbreak harbor less favorable views about vaccination for this particular disease than low-trust respondents who live close to an affected area. This implies that citizens who are skeptical of the CDC and similar institutions base their vaccination decision-making to some degree on whether or not a given disease occurs in close vicinity to their community.

The effect of trust and proximity on vaccine propensity

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 31 Aug 2019]

 

The effect of trust and proximity on vaccine propensity
Florian Justwan, Bert Baumgaertner, Juliet E. Carlisle, Emma Carson, Jordan Kizer
Research Article | published 28 Aug 2019 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0220658
Abstract
The main goal of this paper is to study the effects of (1) trust in government medical experts and (2) proximity to a recent disease outbreak on vaccine propensity. More specifically, we explore how these variables affect attitudes with regards to measles. Using original survey data, collected in January/February 2017, we obtain three main empirical findings. First, contrary to our expectations, an individual’s proximity to a recent measles outbreak has no independent effect on vaccination attitudes. Second, corroborating previous studies in the field, we find that trust in institutions such as the CDC has a positive effect on our dependent variable. Third, there is a significant interactive relationship between proximity and trust in governmental medical experts. While distance from a previous measles outbreak has no effect on vaccination attitudes for respondents with medium or high levels of trust, the variable exerts a negative effect for subjects with little confidence in government medical experts. In other words: low-trust individuals who live farther away from a recent measles outbreak harbor less favorable views about vaccination for this particular disease than low-trust respondents who live close to an affected area. This implies that citizens who are skeptical of the CDC and similar institutions base their vaccination decision-making to some degree on whether or not a given disease occurs in close vicinity to their community.

The impact of public health insurance on health care utilisation, financial protection and health status in low- and middle-income countries: A systematic review

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 31 Aug 2019]

 

The impact of public health insurance on health care utilisation, financial protection and health status in low- and middle-income countries: A systematic review
Darius Erlangga, Marc Suhrcke, Shehzad Ali, Karen Bloor
Research Article | published 28 Aug 2019 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0219731

A review of the cost-effectiveness of adult influenza vaccination and other preventive services

Preventive Medicine
Volume 126 September 2019
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/preventive-medicine/vol/125/suppl/C

 

Review article Abstract only
A review of the cost-effectiveness of adult influenza vaccination and other preventive services
Nazila M. Dabestani, Andrew J. Leidner, Eric E. Seiber, Hyoshin Kim, … Carolyn B. Bridges
Article 105734

Evidence lights the way

Science
30 August 2019 Vol 365, Issue 6456
http://www.sciencemag.org/current.dtl

 

Editorial
Evidence lights the way
By Adam Gamoran
Science30 Aug 2019 : 843
Summary
These are dark times for science and public policy in the United States. In June, it was revealed that the White House suppressed the congressional testimony of a State Department scientist on the implications of climate change for national security—just the latest example of evidence undercut by ideology. Yet, despite this gloomy backdrop, there are glimmers of scientific evidence used to improve policy and practice. In July, a bipartisan group formed the Congressional What Works Caucus to encourage federal investments in evidence-based programs and policies. Since January, the Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act has pushed federal agencies to develop learning agendas and appoint chief data officers to make better use of government data. What will it take to keep the light of evidence burning and ensure that the best science informs important decisions of our time?

Eradication goal splits malaria community

Science
30 August 2019 Vol 365, Issue 6456
http://www.sciencemag.org/current.dtl

 

In Depth
Eradication goal splits malaria community
By Martin Enserink
Science30 Aug 2019 : 847-848 Restricted Access
A Lancet panel wants to end the disease by 2050. A WHO panel says that’s not realistic.
Summary
On 22 April, a World Health Organization (WHO) panel issued the executive summary of a report saying malaria eradication isn’t feasible for the foreseeable future, and that setting any concrete eradication deadline will undermine efforts to control the disease, as it did when WHO first resolved to end malaria in the 1950s. A second high-caliber group disagrees. On 9 September, the Lancet Commission on Malaria Eradication will publish a study recommending that the world set 2050 as the target for global eradication, several scientists tell Science. The debate is about more than just the usefulness of bold goals in global health; a focus on eradication can also skew researchers’ and funders’ priorities, some scientists say.

A vaccine-induced gene expression signature correlates with protection against SIV and HIV in multiple trials

Science Translational Medicine
28 August 2019 Vol 11, Issue 507
https://stm.sciencemag.org/

 

Research Articles
A vaccine-induced gene expression signature correlates with protection against SIV and HIV in multiple trials
By Philip K. Ehrenberg, Shida Shangguan, Biju Issac, Galit Alter, Aviva Geretz, Taisuke Izumi, Christopher Bryant, Michael A. Eller, Frank Wegmann, Richard Apps, Matthew Creegan, Diane L. Bolton, Rafick P. Sekaly, Merlin L. Robb, Robert A. Gramzinski, Maria G. Pau, Hanneke Schuitemaker, Dan H. Barouch, Nelson L. Michael, Rasmi Thomas
Science Translational Medicine28 Aug 2019 Restricted Access
A gene signature in B cells associates with protective efficacy of different vaccine regimens against SIV and HIV infection.

A deliberate choice? Exploring factors related to informed decision-making about childhood vaccination among acceptors, refusers, and partial acceptors

Vaccine
Volume 37, Issue 37 Pages 5505-5664 (3 September 2019)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/vaccine/vol/37/issue/37

 

Research article Open access
A deliberate choice? Exploring factors related to informed decision-making about childhood vaccination among acceptors, refusers, and partial acceptors
Kim A.G.J. Romijnders, Stephne L. van Seventer, Manon Scheltema, Liesbeth van Osch, … Liesbeth Mollema
Pages 5637-5644

Reactive vaccination as a control strategy for pneumococcal meningitis outbreaks in the African meningitis belt: Analysis of outbreak data from Ghana

Vaccine
Volume 37, Issue 37 Pages 5505-5664 (3 September 2019)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/vaccine/vol/37/issue/37

 

Research article Abstract only
Reactive vaccination as a control strategy for pneumococcal meningitis outbreaks in the African meningitis belt: Analysis of outbreak data from Ghana
Laura V. Cooper, James M. Stuart, Charles Okot, Franklin Asiedu-Bekoe, … Caroline L. Trotter
Pages 5657-5663

From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

Journal of Community Health
First Online: 24 August 2019
Original paper
The Impact of Michigan’s Nonmedical Vaccine Exemption Rule Change on Philosophical Exemption Rates
DP Mashinini, KJ Fogarty, RC Potter, MD Lagerwey
Abstract
To examine school factors associated with philosophical exemption rates among kindergarteners in Michigan from 2014, before Michigan’s implementation of administrative rule 325.176 (12), to 2015, after the rule change revising the process for receiving nonmedical exemptions from school entry vaccines. The study explored the extent to which the factors–school type, geographical location, and socioeconomics–were associated with philosophical exemptions among kindergarteners before and after the rule change, using negative binomial regression and Spearman’s Rho correlation. Philosophical exemptions decreased from 2014 to 2015 for all school types but remained highest among rural private schools. Urban private schools had the second highest exemptions with rates 2.22 times higher than those of urban public schools. Exemption rates among rural charter schools were double those of urban public schools, while rural public schools’ rates were 1.22 times higher than those of urban public schools. Free and reduced school lunch eligibility had a strong inverse association with philosophical exemptions for both 2014 and 2015, with higher philosophical exemptions being associated with higher socioeconomic schools. Philosophical exemption rates decreased in the wake of the rule change; however, high philosophical exemptions, post rule change, were still associated with private schools, rural locations, and high socioeconomic status schools.

Media/Policy Watch

Media/Policy Watch
This watch section is intended to alert readers to substantive news, analysis and opinion from the general media and selected think tanks and similar organizations on vaccines, immunization, global public health and related themes. Media Watch is not intended to be exhaustive, but indicative of themes and issues CVEP is actively tracking. This section will grow from an initial base of newspapers, magazines and blog sources, and is segregated from Journal Watch above which scans the peer-reviewed journal ecology.
We acknowledge the Western/Northern bias in this initial selection of titles and invite suggestions for expanded coverage. We are conservative in our outlook in adding news sources which largely report on primary content we are already covering above. Many electronic media sources have tiered, fee-based subscription models for access. We will provide full-text where content is published without restriction, but most publications require registration and some subscription level.

 

The Atlantic
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
[No new, unique, relevant content]

 

BBC
http://www.bbc.co.uk/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
Published Date 29 Aug 2019
Pinterest to direct vaccine searches to health sites
Pinterest users searching for vaccine-related information will be directed to results from “public health organisations”. Last year, the social platform stopped showing results for vaccine searches to tackle the spread of misinformation.

 

The Economist
http://www.economist.com/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
Stories of an extraordinary world
The original anti-vaxxers
How the zeal of Edward Jenner contributed to today’s culture wars
Aug 30th 2019

 

Financial Times
http://www.ft.com/home/uk
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
Ebola
Debate over vaccination strategies dogs Ebola efforts in Congo
New vaccine from J&J could supplement current shot from Merck
Tom Wilson in Beni, Democratic Republic of Congo
August 26, 201

Opinion
Disease prevention
Vaccines ‘most powerful tool against infectious diseases’
Cepi’s Richard Hatchett outlines the economic case for investing in vaccines
Richard Hatchett August 26, 2019

 

Forbes
http://www.forbes.com/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
Aug 30, 2019
Can Any Doctor Ethically Work In A U.S. Immigration Detention Facility?
Given recent decisions by federal immigration authorities and reports of poor conditions in detention facilities, how can any physician currently provide ethical care in these centers?
By Tara Haelle Contributor

Aug 28, 2019
Should Grandparents Get New Vaccinations?
According to AARP, “the baby boom has become the grandparent boom [and] there are now more grandparents in the U.S. than ever before,” Should they vaccinate?
By Robin Seaton Jefferson Contributor

Aug 26, 2019
New Weapon Against Anti-Vaxxers: Smiling Kids Getting Shots
Percentage of unvaccinated children has quadrupled in recent decades.
By Lisette Voytko Forbes Staff

Aug 22, 2019
No Flu Vaccines For Detained Migrant Families? Why This Is Wrong
Assuming that flu viruses did not come up with this policy, here are the problems.
By Bruce Y. Lee Contributor

 

Foreign Affairs
http://www.foreignaffairs.com/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
[No new, unique, relevant content]

Foreign Policy
http://foreignpolicy.com/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
Dispatch
Venezuela’s HIV Crisis Crosses the Border
Unable to get care in a devastated health care system, desperate Venezuelans flow into Colombia.
By Patrick Ammerman
| August 28, 2019, 1:38 PM

 

The Guardian
http://www.guardiannews.com/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
New Zealand
Spread of measles to at-risk Pacific Islands ‘inevitable’ after major New Zealand outbreak
Health professionals scrambling to stop spread after more than 700 measles cases recorded in Auckland this year
Eleanor Ainge Roy
Thu 29 Aug 2019 23.28 EDT

 

New Yorker
http://www.newyorker.com/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
Politics and More Podcast
The Politics Behind the Anti-Vaccine Movement
Nick Paumgarten joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how the fear about vaccines acts likes a virus, and why public-health officials see the phenomenon as part of “an all-out war on science.”
By Dorothy Wickenden
August 29, 2019

A Reporter at Large
September 2, 2019 Issue
The Message of Measles
As public-health officials confront the largest outbreak in the U.S. in decades, they’ve been fighting as much against dangerous ideas as they have against the disease.
By Nick Paumgarten
August 26, 2019

 

New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
Asia Pacific
New Zealand Measles Outbreak Prompts Travel Warning
New Zealand is asking travellers to make sure they are immunised for measles before travelling to its biggest city, Auckland, as the country faces its worst outbreak in over 22 years.
By Reuters Aug. 29

Health
Mumps Sickens Hundreds of Detained Migrants in 19 States
Mumps has swept through 57 immigration detention facilities in 19 states since September, according to the first U.S. government report on the outbreaks in the overloaded immigration system.
By The Associated Press Aug. 29

Americas
Venezuelan Migrants to Get Regional Vaccination Cards Under 10-Nation Pact
Venezuelan migrants will be provided with a regional vaccination card beginning in October, health officials from 10 countries agreed on Monday, in an effort to ensure they receive needed vaccines and are not given double doses.
By Reuters Aug. 26

Theater
Can a Play About Vaccines Be a Laughing Matter?
At the privileged private school in “Eureka Day,” some parents refuse to give shots to their children. Then the mumps hits.
By Elizabeth A. Harris Aug. 25

 

Washington Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
Health and Science
200 years of vaccine skepticism | The Vaccines Project, Episode 1
August 30, 2019 | 2:55 PM EDT
Vaccine hesitancy has existed for over two centuries, fueled by confusion about how vaccines and our immune system work. Reporter Anna Rothschild explores the origins of vaccines, how they make you immune to disease, and when the first anti-vax sentiments arose.

What ingredients are in vaccines? | The Vaccines Project, Episode 2
August 30, 2019 | 2:54 PM EDT
To understand what is in modern vaccines—and why—let’s look back at one of the first lab-created vaccinations that prevented a gruesome childhood illness. Reporter Anna Rothschild will explore why there are things like aluminum, formaldehyde, and mercury in vaccines, and what new vaccine technology is around the corner.

 

Are vaccines safe? | The Vaccines Project, Episode 3
August 30, 2019 | 2:45 PM EDT
How are vaccines tested for safety? Why do kids get so many shots at once? And is anyone looking out for long-term effects? Reporter Anna Rothschild heads to the National Institutes of Health to figure out just how safe vaccines really are.

Pinterest takes the right step toward curbing misinformation on vaccines
Editorial Board · Editorial-Opinion · Aug 30, 2019

Vaccines save lives. But stricter laws may backfire.
Daniela Blei and Tamara Venit Shelton · Aug 30, 2019

Think Tanks et al

Think Tanks et al

Brookings
http://www.brookings.edu/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
[No new relevant content]

 

Center for Global Development
http://www.cgdev.org/page/press-center
[No new relevant content]

 

CSIS
https://www.csis.org/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
[No new relevant content]

 

Council on Foreign Relations
http://www.cfr.org/
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
[No new relevant content]

 

Kaiser Family Foundation
https://www.kff.org/search/?post_type=press-release
Accessed 31 Aug 2019
[No new relevant content]

Vaccines and Global Health: The Week in Review :: 24 August 2019

.– Request anEmail Summary:Vaccines and Global Health : The Week in Review is published as a single email summary, scheduled for release each Saturday evening before midnight (EDT in the U.S.). If you would like to receive the email version, please send your request to david.r.curry@centerforvaccineethicsandpolicy.org.

pdf version A pdf of the current issue is available here: Vaccines and Global Health_The Week in Review_24 Aug 2019

– blog edition: comprised of the approx. 35+ entries posted below.

– Twitter:Readers can also follow developments on twitter: @vaxethicspolicy.
.
– Links:  We endeavor to test each link as we incorporate it into any post, but recognize that some links may become “stale” as publications and websites reorganize content over time. We apologize in advance for any links that may not be operative. We believe the contextual information in a given post should allow retrieval, but please contact us as above for assistance if necessary.

Support this knowledge-sharing service: Your financial support helps us cover our costs and to address a current shortfall in our annual operating budget. Click here to donate and thank you in advance for your contribution.

.
David R. Curry, MS
Executive Director
Center for Vaccine Ethics and Policy

Publication of Vaccines and Global Health: The Week in Review
resumes with this edition following annual leave by the editor/publisher.

Second round of oral cholera vaccine reaches nearly 400,000 people in Aden, Taiz and Al Dhale’e

Milestones :: Perspectives :: Research

 

Yemen

Second round of oral cholera vaccine reaches nearly 400,000 people in Aden, Taiz and Al Dhale’e
Sana’a, 21 August 2019 — A 6-day oral cholera vaccination campaign reached almost 400,000 people, including almost 65,000 children under the age of 5 in Aden, Al Dhale’e and Taiz, where high numbers of suspected cholera and acute watery diarrhoea cases have been recorded.

The first few months of 2019 saw an increase of reported acute watery diarrhoea cases in over 95% of districts across Yemen. Between January and the end of July 2019, there have been nearly 536 000 suspected cases and 773 associated deaths. Children under 5 represent one quarter of all suspected cases.

The vaccination campaign, run by local health authorities, UNICEF and WHO, was made possible thanks to GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance, and to the World Bank’s ‘Emergency Health and Nutrition Project.’

“Amid the fighting in surrounding areas, over 800 health workers, brave men and women, risked their lives to reach communities from cholera — these are the real heroes,” said Altaf Musani, WHO Representative in Yemen.

“Thanks to the extraordinary commitment and dedication of Yemen’s local health workforce, hundreds of thousands of people from these priority districts were reached with vaccination against cholera,” said Sara Beysolow Nyanti, UNICEF Country Representative in Yemen.

Since April 2017, the cholera and acute watery diarrhoea epidemic in Yemen has caused an estimated 2 million suspected cases and 3500 associated deaths. Almost one third have been in children under 5, including 711 associated deaths. The outbreak in Yemen remains the largest cholera in the world.
Health partners throughout Yemen joined forces to control and prevent any future cholera outbreaks. UNICEF and WHO are working closely with the relevant health authorities and other humanitarian partners to respond.

Ebola Could Be Eradicated — But Only if the World Works Together

Milestones :: Perspectives :: Research

 

Opinion
Ebola Could Be Eradicated — But Only if the World Works Together
New treatments for Ebola and drug-resistant tuberculosis offer hope, but they won’t be successful on their own.
By The Editorial Board
New York Times, 16 Aug 2019
The global health community got a few pieces of hopeful news this week. On Monday the World Health Organization announced that two newly developed intravenous drug therapies appear capable of curing Ebola. The medications could help end a continuing epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where nearly 2,800 people have been infected over the past year and more than 1,800 have died. Combined with the recently developed Ebola vaccine, they could even help eradicate a disease that has killed more than 12,000 people over the past four decades.

Then, on Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration effectively endorsed a three-drug treatment that appears to cure so-called extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis — the deadliest version of the world’s deadliest infectious disease. Tuberculosis infects about 10 million people globally every year, and roughly 30,000 to 50,000 people are believed to be infected with the extensively drug-resistant strain, which is usually fatal.

Together, these developments could mark a pivotal moment in the century-long quest for global health security. But that quest will only succeed with the help of sustained, cross-border collaboration. For instance, countries need health systems capable of detecting disease outbreaks and delivering and monitoring these new treatments — all of which require substantial funding. International policies must be in place to promote the use of the treatments, and affected communities need to trust the organizations charged with providing their care.

The latest effort to stamp out Ebola in Congo has faced some of these problems — there’s been a deep mistrust of global health workers, and the World Health Organization has received only half of the money that donors have promised to devote to the crisis. The fight against tuberculosis faces similar challenges, including a lack of global investment that has prevented medication and innovative diagnostics from reaching the people who need them most. Roughly a quarter of people believed to be infected with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis are properly treated for the disease, a problem that will need to be resolved quickly for the new drugs to have an impact.

Each of these challenges has been exacerbated by an increase in xenophobia around the globe. As the journalist Maryn McKenna wrote in The New Republic earlier this year, “the assumption that every nation owes an investment in health to every other nation no longer holds.” Nowhere is this shift more pronounced than in the United States, which until recently was a leader in global health. During the last Ebola outbreak, which spread across West Africa from 2014 to 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention deployed the largest number of personnel in that agency’s history. By the time the crisis had resolved, the Obama administration had begun a global initiative to better protect the world from infectious disease threats. More than 60 countries ultimately participated.

In recent years, that leadership has all but evaporated. In the past two years, the Trump administration has dissolved the federal government’s biosecurity directorate, scaled back its infectious disease prevention efforts, restricted development aid for countries like Congo, made several attempts to rescind foreign aid, including for global health, and pulled C.D.C. workers from Congo’s outbreak zones without a clear plan to send them back.

The administration has also announced policies meant to scare legal immigrants off public assistance programs, including for health care, to which they are legally entitled. Such policies imperil everyone: The more people who don’t have access to vaccines or antibiotics, the greater the risk that an infectious disease will spread. That applies to diseases like Ebola that might arrive on American shores from other countries, but it also applies to diseases that are already here, like flu and measles. The only reliable way for a country to protect itself from these threats is for it to help other countries do the same.

The new medications for Ebola and tuberculosis are the product of years of investment and careful work. That investment could continue to pay off, but only if the United States and its partners around the world increase their global health efforts, instead of shrinking away from them.

Emergencies

Emergencies

Ebola – DRC+
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Disease Outbreak News (DONs)
Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
22 August 2019
The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces in the Democratic Republic of the Congo continued this week with similar transmission intensity (Figure 1). While the last few weeks of the outbreak have been characterized by the geographic expansion of cases to new health zones, we continue to see high case numbers, sustained local transmission, and inter-health zone movement of cases both into and out of the hotspot areas of Beni, Mandima, and Butembo. In the past 21 days from 31 July through 20 August 2019, 69 health areas within 19 health zones reported new cases (Table 1, Figure 2). During this period, a total of 216 confirmed cases were reported, with the majority coming from the health zones of Beni (31%, n=66), Mandima (18%, n=38), and Butembo (8%, n=18). High risks of transmission are also associated with an emerging cluster in the city of Mambasa, which has reported 14 cases in the past 21 days. The response continues to address these hotspots through early case detection and thorough investigation, strong contact identification and follow up, and engagement with the local communities.

Two new health zones reported cases in the past week: Mwenga Health Zone in South Kivu and Pinga Health Zone in North Kivu. In Mwenga, four confirmed cases were reported after two individuals (mother and child) had contact with a confirmed case in Beni before travelling south. The father of the child was subsequently confirmed positive as was a co-patient in a community health facility where the first case initially sought care…

On 19 August 2019, a “ville morte” protest took place in Beni, Butembo, and Oicha in response to recent attacks by armed groups on civilians. This resulted in a temporary suspension of Ebola response activities. Operations resumed on 20 August 2019 with increased caution, and further demonstrations are anticipated. The suspension of Ebola response activities often results in an increase of case numbers and spread of cases to new areas in the subsequent weeks….

::::::

Update on Ebola drug trial: two strong performers identified
12 August 2019
WHO Departmental news
Geneva
The co-sponsors of the Ebola therapeutics trial in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) have announced advances that will bring patients a better chance of survival. Two out of the four drugs being tested are more effective in treating Ebola. Moving forward, these are the only drugs that future patients will be treated with. Details of the changes are available in this WHO/NIAID/INRB release.

This WHO initiative is the first-ever multi-drug randomized control trial aimed at evaluating the safety and efficacy of four drugs used for treatment of Ebola patients. Initially developed as a multi-outbreak, multi-country study, PALM (“Together save lives”) was launched in November 2018. It is part of the emergency response in DRC, in collaboration with a broad alliance of partners, including the DRC’s National Institute for Biomedical Research (INRB), Ministry of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), which is part of the United States’ National Institutes of Health, Alliance for International Medical Action (ALIMA), Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), the International Medical Corps (IMC), and other organizations.

In addition to researching the best treatments for Ebola, other efforts by team members and partners in the field are also critical in impacting survival rates.  Teams of epidemiologists and community members work with communities to identify cases and provide care as quickly as possible. The teams ensure contacts are vaccinated against the disease and that their health is monitored for three weeks. Active case finding, contact tracing, and community acceptance of these teams are vital to ending the outbreak.

WHO is committed to continuing to work closely with the ministries of health of DRC and neighboring countries, and other international partners to ensure the outbreak response remains robust and well-coordinated.  We will continue to conduct rigorous research and incorporate findings into the Ebola outbreak response through a variety of prevention and control strategies.

::::::

World Bank and WHO Statement on Partnership & Deployment of Financing to WHO for Ebola Response in DRC
22 August 2019 News release
The World Bank and the World Health Organization (WHO), along with the Government and other key partners, are working in close partnership on the Ebola Crisis Response in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Central to this partnership is the assessment of the financing needs, and deployment of resources, with the goal to put an end to the current deadly outbreak.

The World Bank is today announcing that US$50 million in funding is to be released to WHO for its lifesaving operational work on the frontlines of the outbreak. The WHO is announcing that this US$50 million in funds will close the financing gap for its emergency health response in DRC through to the end of September 2019, and is calling on other partners to mirror this generous support in order to fund the response through to December.

The funding comprises US$30 million from the Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility (PEF) and US$20 million from the World Bank. The US$50 million in grant funding is part of the larger financial package of approximately US$300 million that the World Bank announced last month to support the fourth Strategic Response Plan for the DRC Ebola outbreak.

“WHO is very grateful for the World Bank’s support, which fills a critical gap in our immediate needs for Ebola response efforts in DRC, and will enable the heroic workers on the frontlines of this fight to continue their lifesaving work,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization. “We keenly await further funding from other partners to sustain the response through to the end of the year.”

The DRC government, working in collaboration with the World Bank, WHO, and other key partners, has finalized the Fourth Strategic Response Plan (SRP4), which outlines the total resources needed for the DRC Ebola Crisis Response from July to December 2019. The financing announced today is part of the World Bank’s previously announced financial package of up to US$300 million and covers over half of SRP4’s needs, with the remainder requiring additional funding from other donors and partners.

“The World Bank is working closely with WHO, the Government of DRC, and all partners to do everything we can to put an end to the latest Ebola outbreak,” saidAnnette Dixon, Vice President, Human Development at the World Bank.“The partnership between our organizations and the Government is critical for responding to the emergency as well as rebuilding systems for delivery of basic services and to restoring the trust of communities.”

The Government of DRC requested US$30 million from the PEF Cash Window to be paid directly to WHO. The PEF Steering Body approved the request bringing the PEF’s total contribution to fighting Ebola in DRC to US$61.4 million. The PEF is a financing mechanism housed at the World Bank; its Steering Body is co-chaired by the World Bank and WHO, and comprises donor country members from Japan, Germany and Australia. The quick and flexible financing it provides saves lives, by enabling governments and international responders to concentrate on fighting Ebola—not fundraising.

::::::
::::::

POLIO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Polio this week as of 22 August 2019
:: Nigeria marked three years since the last case of wild poliovirus (WPV) was detected within its borders. Because Nigeria is the last polio-endemic country in Africa, this milestone opens the door for the potential WPV-free certification of the entire WHO AFRO region after the Africa Regional Certification Commission (ARCC) evaluation as early as mid-2020. While this is an important programmatic milestone, the region has not yet been certified polio-free and it will be critical for polio programme to maintain momentum.

Summary of new viruses this week:
:: Afghanistan —one wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) case;
:: Pakistan — one WPV1-positive environmental sample;
:: Angola — one cVDPV2 case;
:: Ghana — one cVDPVE2 case.

::::::
::::::

Editor’s Note:
WHO has posted a refreshed emergencies page which presents an updated listing of Grade 3,2,1 emergencies as below.
WHO Grade 3 Emergencies [to 24 Aug 2019]

Democratic Republic of the Congo
:: Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo Disease Outbreak News (DONs)
22 August 2019
:: Update on Ebola drug trial: two strong performers identified 12 August 2019
[See DRC Ebola+ above for detail]

Nigeria
:: Three years without a case of wild polio virus, Government of Nigeria warns against complacency 21 August 2019
:: Nigeria introduces Meningitis A Conjugate Vaccine into Routine EPI Schedule 12 August 2019

Syrian Arab Republic
:: Syrian Arabic Republic: tackling NCDs in emergencies through primary health care
5 August 2019

Yemen
:: Second round of oral cholera vaccine reaches nearly 400 000 people in Aden, Taiz and Al Dhale’e 21 August 2019

Cyclone Idai – No new digest announcements identified
Mozambique floods – No new digest announcements identified
Somalia – No new digest announcements identified
South Sudan – No new digest announcements identified

::::::

WHO Grade 2 Emergencies [to 24 Aug 2019]

Afghanistan
:: Afghan women eradicating polio #womenhumanitarians 19 August 2019

Malawi floods
:: WHO and MOH brief Malawian journalists about the Ebola Virus Disease outbreak situation in the African Region

Cameroon – No new digest announcements identified
Central African Republic – No new digest announcements identified
Ethiopia – No new digest announcements identified
HIV in Pakistan – No new digest announcements identified
Iran floods 2019 – No new digest announcements identified
Iraq – No new digest announcements identified
Libya – No new digest announcements identified
MERS-CoV – No new digest announcements identified
Myanmar – No new digest announcements identified
Measles in Europe – No new digest announcements identified
Niger – No new digest announcements identified
occupied Palestinian territory – No new digest announcements identified
Sudan – No new digest announcements identified
Ukraine – No new digest announcements identified
Zimbabwe – No new digest announcements identified

::::::

WHO Grade 1 Emergencies [to 24 Aug 2019]

Angola – No new digest announcements identified
Chad – No new digest announcements identified
Djibouti – No new digest announcements identified
Indonesia – Sulawesi earthquake 2018 – No new digest announcements identified
Kenya – No new digest announcements identified
Mali – No new digest announcements identified
Namibia – viral hepatitis – No new digest announcements identified
Tanzania – No new digest announcements identified

::::::
::::::

UN OCHA – L3 Emergencies
The UN and its humanitarian partners are currently responding to three ‘L3’ emergencies. This is the global humanitarian system’s classification for the response to the most severe, large-scale humanitarian crises. 
Syrian Arab Republic
:: Syrian Arab Republic: Recent Developments in Northwestern Syria Situation Report No. 10 – as of 23 August 2019

Yemen
:: Yemen: Flash Floods Flash Update No. 2 As of 19 August 2019

::::::

UN OCHA – Corporate Emergencies
When the USG/ERC declares a Corporate Emergency Response, all OCHA offices, branches and sections provide their full support to response activities both at HQ and in the field.
Editor’s Note:
Ebola in the DRC has bene added as a OCHA “Corporate Emergency” this week:
CYCLONE IDAI and Kenneth – No new digest announcements identified
EBOLA OUTBREAK IN THE DRC – No new digest announcements identified

::::::
::::::

WHO & Regional Offices [to 24 Aug 2019]

WHO & Regional Offices [to 24 Aug 2019]
23 August 2019 News release
Rising to the challenge of malaria eradication
The World Health Organization (WHO) says accelerated research and development (R&D) in new tools for malaria prevention and treatment is key if the world is to eradicate malaria in the foreseeable future: today less than 1% of funding for health R&D investment goes to developing tools to tackle malaria.
WHO also flags the urgent need for progress to advance universal health coverage and improve access to services, and better surveillance to guide a more targeted malaria response.
The findings have emerged in a report from WHO’s Strategic Advisory Group on Malaria Eradication (SAGme)…

22 August 2019 News release
World Bank and WHO Statement on Partnership & Deployment of Financing to WHO for Ebola Response in DRC
[See Ebola above for detail]

22 August 2019 News release
WHO calls for more research into microplastics and a crackdown on plastic pollution

21 August 2019 News release
Three years without a case of wild polio virus, Government of Nigeria warns against complacency

18 August 2019 News release
WHO Director-General underscores commitment to strengthening health in Pacific Islands

15 August 2019 News release
WHO congratulates new UNAIDS Executive Director

14 August 2019 News release
Burundi launches ebola vaccination campaign for health and front-line workers

 

::::::

Weekly Epidemiological Record, 23 August 2019, vol. 94, 34 (pp. 381–388)
:: Progress towards poliomyelitis eradication – Afghanistan, January 2018–May 2019

Weekly Epidemiological Record, 16 August 2019, vol. 94, 33 (pp. 365–380)
:: fever in Africa and the Americas, 2018
:: Monthly report on dracunculiasis cases, January- June 2019

Weekly Epidemiological Record, 9 August 2019, vol. 94, 32 (pp. 345–364)
:: Review of the 2018–2019 influenza season in the northern hemisphere

 

::::::

WHO Regional Offices
Selected Press Releases, Announcements
WHO African Region AFRO
:: WHO supports Cross River State in administering polio vaccines to Cameroonian refuge…
22 August 2019
:: Restoring people’s trust in medical facilities an essential prescription for achievi…
22 August,  Brazzaville – Populations across the 47 Member States of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) African Region only utilize an average 48% of their available health services. But only an average 34% of those same populations even has access to essential services. And health systems in those countries only perform, on average, at 49% of their possible level of functionality.
:: WHO and Africa CDC agree on joint actions to improve health security in Africa 22 August 2019
:: African health ministers agree to an all-fronts push to control the rise in vector-b…
22 August 2019
With countries in Africa experiencing increased cases and deaths due to malaria and other vector-borne diseases, 47 health ministers endorsed the region’s first aggressive plan for vector control across the continent that recognizes the need for an all-fronts push on eliminating the disease transmitters.
:: Countries launch synchronized cross border campaign to fight against polio: Somali region of Ethiopia alone to vaccinate over half million under 5 children 21 August 2019
:: Africa today heads into the last mile to be free of wild polio 21 August 2019
:: Burundi launches ebola vaccination campaign for health and front-line workers 14 August 2019
:: Driving levers of change for improved immunization coverage in weak performing LGAs
Abuja, 8 August, 2019 – The World Health Organization (WHO) is currently providing guidance to intensifying Routine Immunization (RI) strategies in low performing Local Government Areas (LGAs) in priority States in Nigeria.

WHO Region of the Americas PAHO
:: Youth leaders to share ideas with PAHO on improving adolescent health in the Americas (08/12/2019)
:: Which are the key medical devices for primary health care services (08/06/2019)
:: Birth defects registries expanding in Latin America (08/06/2019)

WHO South-East Asia Region SEARO
No new digest content identified.

WHO European Region EURO
:: Remembering Professor Lowell Levin, pioneer of health promotion 21-08-2019
:: Low risk of Ebola virus disease in the WHO European Region 19-08-2019
:: On World Humanitarian Day, WHO recognizes women at the forefront of humanitarian work 16-08-2019
:: International Youth Day 2019: Role of mentors in nursing and midwifery education 12-08-2019
:: Syrian Arab Republic: tackling noncommunicable diseases in emergencies through primary health care 08-08-2019

WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region EMRO
:: WHO trains Libyans to prevent and control deadly diseases 22 August 2019
:: Oral cholera vaccine reaches nearly 400 000 people in Yemen 21 August 2019
:: Stamping out leprosy in Libya 8 August 2019

WHO Western Pacific Region
:: Parliamentarians: Climate crisis one of the most critical threats to health in the Asia-Pacific region 23 August 2019

CDC/ACIP [to 24 Aug 2019]

CDC/ACIP [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.cdc.gov/media/index.html
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/index.html
Latest News
Thursday, August 22, 2019
An Estimated 92% of Cancers Caused by HPV Could be Prevented by Vaccine
During 2012-2016, an average of 43,999 HPV-associated cancers were reported each year, according to a new study published today in CDC’s  Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Among the estimated 34,800 cancers probably caused by HPV, 92 percent are attributable to the HPV types that are included in the HPV vaccine and could be prevented if HPV vaccine recommendations were followed, according to the report.

MMWR News Synopsis for Friday, August 23, 2019
National, Regional, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17 Years — United States, 2018
2018 data show that adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates increased slightly, but more work needs to be done to protect more people against HPV-associated cancers. A new report from the CDC shows little progress toward increasing HPV vaccination rates among teenagers 13-17 years old. HPV vaccination rates increased slightly for boys, but there was no increase in rates among girls, highlighting the need for continued efforts to ensure all boys and girls are vaccinated on time. The percentage of teen boys and girls who received all recommended doses of the HPV vaccine increased from 49% to 51%. The increase in HPV vaccination rates was due to increases in boys only. The percentage of boys who received all recommended doses increased by 4 percentage points compared to 0.6 percentage points among girls. HPV vaccination rates were higher among teens whose parents reported receiving a recommendation from their child’s healthcare professional.

Human Papillomavirus–Attributable Cancers — United States, 2012–2016
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common virus that can lead to certain types of cancer later in life. The current HPV vaccine could prevent 92% percent of cancers attributable to HPV. A new CDC study found that there were 43,999 HPV-associated cancers (cancers in organ sites where HPV often causes cancer) from 2012 through 2016. CDC researchers estimated the annual number of cancers that can potentially be prevented by the current vaccine for the nation and for each state. The current HPV vaccine protects against 92% or 32,100 of the 34,8000 cancers thought to be caused by HPV from 2012 through 2016. In addition to HPV vaccination, cervical cancer screening is routinely recommended for women ages 21-65 regardless of HPV vaccination status.

Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication — Afghanistan, January 2018–May 2019
To achieve polio eradication in Afghanistan, the vaccination program needs to reach approximately 10 million children, the majority of whom are currently not receiving oral poliovirus vaccine through house-to-house polio campaigns. This could be achieved by regaining access to communities and building community trust. A new report describes the progress toward polio eradication in Afghanistan during January 2018-May 2019. Afghanistan and Pakistan are the only two countries with reported cases of wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) since 2016. The number of WPV1 cases in Afghanistan has been increasing yearly since 2017. While circulation has remained confined to the Southern and Eastern regions of the country, the geographic range of WPV1 in Southern districts increased in 2019. A nationwide ban on house-to-house campaigns by antigovernment groups that has been in effect since April 2019 has left millions of children unvaccinated. To achieve polio eradication, the program needs to regain access to house-to-house campaigns and increase community demand for polio vaccine.

Recommendations and Reports:
Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices — United States, 2019–2020 Influenza Season
This issue of MMWR Recommendations and Reports summarizes the latest data on influenza vaccination and lays out CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations related to influenza vaccination. CDC recommends that everyone age 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every year, with rare exceptions. There are many different types of flu vaccines available for different age groups and health indications. CDC does not recommend one flu vaccine over another. The most important thing is for all people 6 months and older to get a flu vaccination every year. If you have questions about which vaccine is best for you, talk to your doctor or other health care professional.

MMWR News Synopsis for Friday, August 16, 2019
Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination of Adults
CDC recommends vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) at age 11 to 12 years, and now also recommends catch-up vaccination through age 26 years for all genders. Although CDC does not recommend catch-up vaccination for all adults ages 27 through 45 years, some people in this age range who are at risk for new HPV infection might benefit from vaccination. HPV vaccine prevents new HPV infections that can cause cancers and other health problems. Because vaccination provides the most benefit when given before exposure to any HPV, it is recommended for all 11- to 12-year-olds. Catch-up recommendations apply to people not vaccinated as preteens. This report updates CDC recommendations for adults in the United States.I It harmonizes the catch-up age through age 26 years for all genders and adds guidance about HPV vaccination for adults ages 27 through 45 years who are at risk for new HPV infection and might benefit from vaccination. Although 9-valent HPV vaccine is licensed for use through age 45 years, CDC does not recommend it for all such adults, and clinicians need not discuss HPV vaccination with all adults over the age of 26 years because most people in this age range are unlikely to benefit from vaccination.

Africa CDC [to 24 Aug 2019]

Africa CDC [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.africacdc.org/
News
MARKET ENGAGEMENT: REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (Design, building, supply and installation of Biosafety Level 3 (BSL3) laboratory in Lusaka, Zambia)
20-08-2019
Name of Project: Africa CDC Regional Investment Financing Program
Sector: Health Sector
Project ID: P167916   The Government of the Republic of Zambia has applied for financing from the World Bank towards the cost of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and…

China CDC

China CDC
http://www.chinacdc.cn/en/
No new digest content identified.

 

National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China
http://en.nhc.gov.cn/
Selected Updates and Press Releases
Law enforcement campaign to target drug monopolies
2019-08-23
China will launch a nationwide law enforcement campaign in the pharmaceutical sector this year targeting drug monopolies to improve security of supply, a top health official said on Thursday.

Healthcare cooperation with Arab countries to be expanded
2019-08-20
China will expand healthcare cooperation with the Arab world through more medical assistance, information sharing and joint research, the health minister said on Aug 16.

Medics on way to help curb Ebola outbreaks among African countries
2019-08-14
China will send public health experts to Uganda and South Sudan at those countries’ request to help prevent outbreaks of Ebola, director of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention said.

Education and testing may rein in HIV rates
2019-08-02
Number of infected to likely keep rising, but prevalence expected to remain low.

Announcements

Announcements

 

Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://alleninstitute.org/what-we-do/frontiers-group/news-press/
News
News from The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group: August 2019
August 6, 2019
Highlights include a roundup of our recent Exploring Frontiers symposiums on modeling and morphogensis, a funding initiative for new cancer initiatives and more.

 

BMGF – Gates Foundation [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.gatesfoundation.org/Media-Center/Press-Releases
No new digest content identified.

 

Bill & Melinda Gates Medical Research Institute [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.gatesmri.org/
The Bill & Melinda Gates Medical Research Institute is a non-profit biotech organization. Our mission is to develop products to fight malaria, tuberculosis, and diarrheal diseases—three major causes of mortality, poverty, and inequality in developing countries. The world has unprecedented scientific tools at its disposal; now is the time to use them to save the lives of the world’s poorest people
No new digest content identified.

 

CARB-X [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://carb-x.org/
CARB-X is a non-profit public-private partnership dedicated to accelerating antibacterial research to tackle the global rising threat of drug-resistant bacteria.
08.20.2019  |
CARB-X funds Vaxxilon AG to develop a new vaccine to prevent carbapenem-resistant superbug Klebsiella pneumoniae infections
Multivalent conjugate vaccine aims to prevent deadly hospital-acquired respiratory, urinary-tract and other infections that kill thousands of patients each year
(BOSTON, USA) – CARB-X, a global partnership led by Boston University, is awarding Vaxxilon AG of Reinach, Switzerland, up to $1.4 million in non-dilutive funding with the possibility of $3.1 million more if certain project milestones are met, to develop a multivalent vaccine to prevent infections caused by carbapenem-resistant bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae, an invasive Gram-negative superbug associated with life-threatening intensive-care and hospital-acquired infections and high mortality rates.
“Vaccines are vital tools in the fight against disease and drug-resistant bacteria, with the potential to prevent infections and reduce the spread of life-threatening bacteria,” said Kevin Outterson, Executive Director of CARB-X and Professor of Law at Boston University. “Vaxxilon’s vaccine, if approved for use in patients, could prevent deadly infections and save the lives of thousands of patients in hospitals worldwide who might otherwise contract infections and die.”…

8.15.2019  |
CARB-X funds Integrated Biotherapeutics to expand the development of its Staphylococcus aureus vaccine to facilitate use in the developing world
CARB-X, a global partnership led by Boston University, is awarding Integrated Biotherapeutics (IBT) of Rockville, Maryland, USA, $1.6 million to expand the development of its vaccine against Staphylococcus aureus, including  Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) superbugs, so that the vaccine can be used to prevent infections in developing nations, as well as in the developed world. Under this initiative, IBT will expand its R&D to evaluate the efficacy of its vaccine, IBT-V02, against strains of the bacteria found in developing nations, and will also explore development of a freeze-dried version of the vaccine so that it can be used where cold storage systems are not available.

 

CEPI – Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://cepi.net/
21 August 2019
CEPI and Africa CDC to host panel event at TICAD 7
How can we strengthen epidemic preparedness and response in Africa?
This is the topic CEPI and the Africa CDC will be exploring on Wednesday, August 28, at the seventh Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD 7).
We will be hosting a high-level panel event to discuss the challenges of epidemic preparedness in Africa and how CEPI, the Africa CDC, and its partners in Africa can and should be working together…

 

Clinton Health Access Initiative, Inc. (CHAI) [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://clintonhealthaccess.org/about/
No new digest content identified.

 

EDCTP [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.edctp.org/
The European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) aims to accelerate the development of new or improved drugs, vaccines, microbicides and diagnostics against HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria as well as other poverty-related and neglected infectious diseases in sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on phase II and III clinical trials
Latest news
21 August 2019
Invitation to apply for membership of the EDCTP Audit Committee
The European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) invites suitable candidates to apply for membership of its Audit Committee. EDCTP is a public-public partnership of, currently, 16 African and 14 European countries, and the European Union. The Delegation Agreement…

14 August 2019
EC invites feedback on next EDCTP programme
The European Commission seeks feedback from citizens and stakeholders on its outline for an EDCTP successor programme. This is one of the early steps in the process of creating a future EDCTP programme under the umbrella of the next European…

 

Emory Vaccine Center [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.vaccines.emory.edu/
No new digest content identified.

 

European Medicines Agency [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.ema.europa.eu/ema/
News and press releases
News: EMA/FDA analysis shows high degree of alignment in marketing application decisions between EU and US
Last updated: 16/08/2019

 

European Vaccine Initiative [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.euvaccine.eu/news-events
No new digest content identified.

 

FDA [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/default.htm
No new digest content identified.

 

Fondation Merieux [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.fondation-merieux.org/
No new digest content identified.

 

Gavi [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.gavi.org/
Latest news
Using drones to reach remote communities with vaccines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
09 August 2019
During a recent visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Gavi spoke to Freddy Nkosi, Senior Manager of Advocacy and Communications at VillageReach, about the planned vaccine delivery drone launch in Équateur Province in the north of the DRC. Nkosi is based in the DRC capital, Kinshasa, and is part of the regional and global VillageReach team

 

GHIT Fund [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.ghitfund.org/newsroom/press
GHIT was set up in 2012 with the aim of developing new tools to tackle infectious diseases that devastate the world’s poorest people. Other funders include six Japanese pharmaceutical
No new digest content identified.

 

Global Fund [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.theglobalfund.org/en/news/
News
European Union Announces Major Increase to the Global Fund
24 August 2019
… President of the European Council Donald Tusk announced on behalf of the EU a pledge of €550 million for the Global Fund’s Sixth Replenishment during the G7 Summit in Biarritz. This represents an increase of 16 percent over their previous contribution…

News
Canada Steps Up Fight Against Epidemics with a Major Increase to Global Fund
22 August 2019
GENEVA – The Global Fund warmly welcomed today’s announcement by Canadian Minister of International Development and Minister for Women and Gender Equality, Maryam Monsef, of a new pledge of CAD 930.4 million to the Global Fund for the next three years. The new pledge – representing a 15.7% increase from Canada’s previous pledge – is a tremendous investment in global efforts to end the epidemics of HIV, TB and malaria…

News
Switzerland Increases Contribution to Global Fund
21 August 2019
… In its meeting today in Bern, the Swiss Federal Council approved a contribution of CHF64 million to the Global Fund’s Sixth Replenishment. This is the highest contribution ever granted by Switzerland to the Global Fund…

News
Patricia Moser Elected Chair of Technical Review Panel
20 August 2019
GENEVA − The Technical Review Panel, a group of independent experts who review requests for funding to the Global Fund, has elected Dr. Patricia Moser as its new chair.
Dr. Moser is a distinguished public health economist from the United States, with more than three decades of experience improving access to health services and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries.
Dr. Moser has worked extensively on efforts to remove HIV, tuberculosis and malaria as major impediments to improved health, and supporting stronger health systems that are an indispensable component of ending epidemics…

 

Hilleman Laboratories [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.hillemanlabs.org/
No new digest content identified.

 

Human Vaccines Project [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.humanvaccinesproject.org/media/press-releases/
Press Release
Four Distinguished Global Leaders Join Efforts to Decode the Human Immune System
New York – August 13, 2019 – Four distinguished global leaders are joining the Human Vaccines Project to help push forward its effort to solve one the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century, the decoding of the human immune system. A 21-year member of Australia’s Parliament who spent five years as Foreign Minister, the Honorable Julie Bishop will join the Board of Directors. Internationally recognized Dutch virologist Jaap Goudsmit takes the helm as Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Vice President, while Soumya Swaminathan of the World Health Organization and Jerome Kim of the International Vaccine Institute join the Project’s Scientific Steering Committee…

 

IAVI [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.iavi.org/newsroom
No new digest content identified.

 

 

International Coalition of Medicines Regulatory Authorities (ICMRA)
http://www.icmra.info/drupal/en/news
Statements and Press Releases
No new digest content identified.

 

 

IFFIm
http://www.iffim.org/library/news/press-releases/
No new digest content identified.

 

IFRC [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/news/press-releases/
Selected Press Releases, Announcements
Asia Pacific, Bangladesh, Myanmar
Press release: Rakhine crisis – Two years on, the struggle for safety, privacy and dignity
Tens of thousands of people who fled violence in Rakhine to camps in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh are living their lives in cramped tents and shelters, in conditions that fall well below international standards.

 

IVAC [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/ivac/index.html
Updates
Four takeaways from iHEA 2019, a Swiss summit on health economics
August 2019
Last month, representatives from the IVAC Economics and Finance (E&F) team attended the International Health Economics Association (iHEA) Congress in Basel, Switzerland. As new members of Immunization Economics, a specialized group of economists working on immunization, Bryan Patenaude, Cristina Garcia, Gatien de Broucker, and Elizabeth (Libby) Watts had several significant contributions to the biannual conference. […]

 

IVI [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.ivi.int/
IVI News & Announcements
IVI Director General Dr. Jerome Kim to join the Human Vaccines Project’s Efforts as One of Four Distinguished Global Leaders to Decode the Human Immune System
August 16, 2019 – SEOUL, South Korea – Dr. Jerome Kim, Director General of the International Vaccine Institute (IVI), joins the Human Vaccines Project as one of four distinguished global leaders to help push forward its effort to solve one the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century, the decoding of the human immune system. Dr. Kim will join the Project’s Scientific Steering Committee, together with Dr. Soumya Swaminathan of the World Health Organization.  The Honorable Julie Bishop, a 21-year member of Australia’s Parliament who spent five years as Foreign Minister will join the Project’s Board of Directors and internationally recognized Dutch virologist Jaap Goudsmit takes the helm as Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Vice President….

 

JEE Alliance [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.jeealliance.org/
Selected News and Events
No new digest content identified.

 

MSF/Médecins Sans Frontières [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.msf.org/
Selected News; Project Updates, Reports
Cameroon
A multidisciplinary approach to stem the spread of cholera
Project Update 21 Aug 2019

Rohingya refugee crisis
Two years on: No solutions in sight for the Rohingya
Project Update 20 Aug 2019

Democratic Republic of Congo
A deadly measles outbreak is spreading like wildfire
Project Update 16 Aug 2019

Tuberculosis
Promising new tuberculosis drug pretomanid approved, but will it be affordable?
Press Release 15 Aug 2019

Brazil
The struggle of Venezuelan migrants and asylum seekers in northern Brazil
Project Update 14 August 2019

 

NIH [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases
August 21, 2019
NIH funds genetic counseling resource ahead of million-person sequencing effort
— Genetic counseling and technological infrastructure for the All of Us Research Program to be provided by Color.

August 14, 2019
Leaders of NIH’s All of Us Research Program recap progress and next steps
— Strong progress has been made in efforts to advance precision medicine

Monday, August 12, 2019
Independent monitoring board recommends early termination of Ebola therapeutics trial in DRC because of favorable results with two of four candidates
The Pamoja Tulinde Maisha (PALM [together save lives]) study is a randomized, controlled trial of four investigational agents (ZMapp, remdesivir, mAb114 and REGN-EB3) for the treatment of patients with Ebola virus disease. The study began on Nov. 20, 2018 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) as part of the emergency response to an ongoing Ebola outbreak in the North Kivu and Ituri Provinces.
As of Aug. 9, 2019, the trial had enrolled 681 patients toward an enrollment total of 725. Patients were enrolled at four Ebola Treatment Centers (ETCs) in Beni, Katwa, Butembo and Mangina. These ETCs have been overseen by staff from the Institut National de Recherche Biomédicale (INRB); the DRC Ministry of Health; and three medical humanitarian organizations: the Alliance for International Medical Action (ALIMA), the International Medical Corps (IMC), and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).
The trial is monitored by an independent data and safety monitoring board (DSMB) that meets periodically to review interim safety and efficacy data and to make recommendations to the study team and the sponsors. As a result of their Aug. 9, 2019 review, the DSMB recommended that the study be stopped and that all future patients be randomized to receive either REGN-EB3 or mAb114 in what is being considered an extension phase of the study. This recommendation was based on the fact that an early stopping criterion in the protocol had been met by one of the products, REGN-EB3. The preliminary results in 499 study participants indicated that individuals receiving REGN-EB3 or mAb114 had a greater chance of survival compared to participants in the other two arms.
The principal investigators of the study, its statistician and its co-sponsors accepted this recommendation, and the ETC staff at the sites were promptly informed. In addition to limiting future patient randomizations to REGN-EB3 and mAb114, patients who were randomized to ZMapp or remdesivir in the last 10 days now have the option, at the discretion of their treating physician, to receive either REGN-EB3 or mAb114…

August 8, 2019
NIH-funded study will test seasonal flu vaccines with two experimental adjuvants
— Adjuvants are compounds added to vaccines to induce stronger and longer-lasting immune responses

 

PATH [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.path.org/media-center/
August 14, 2019 by PATH
In new Living Labs initiative, health care workers will co-create solutions to increase immunization coverage in sub-Saharan Africa
Seattle, WA, August 14, 2019 – PATH and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation have launched a new partnership to develop innovative approaches that engage and build on the motivation of frontline immunization workers for improved performance. The Living Labs initiative will put health care workers at the center of defining the challenges they face in their daily work and being the architects of creative solutions. This project is a new way for PATH, the Gates Foundation, and health care workers to partner as co-creators in the rapid designing, prototyping, and testing of new solutions to increase immunization coverage and equity…

 

Sabin Vaccine Institute [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.sabin.org/updates/pressreleases
August 13, 2019
Sabin Vaccine Institute Elects New Trustees Bringing Expertise to Support Program Growth
WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin) announces the appointment of three new members to its Board of Trustees. Joining the Board are Drs. Elizabeth Fox, Saad Omer and Jacqueline Shea, well-respected leaders whose range of skills and experience promise to advance Sabin’s aim to ensure all people, everywhere get the vaccines they need.

August 6, 2019
GSK Grants Exclusive Technology License For Clinical-Stage Ebola Vaccines To Sabin Vaccine Institute
Transfer from GSK and partnership with NIAID will enable Sabin to advance development of the candidate vaccines
LONDON / WASHINGTON, D.C. – GSK and the Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin) today announced exclusive agreements for Sabin to advance the development of the prophylactic candidate vaccines against the deadly Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan and the closely related, but lesser known, Marburg virus.

 

UNAIDS [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.unaids.org/en
Selected Press Releases/Reports/Statements
22 August 2019
Osh signs the Paris Declaration
Osh, Kyrgyzstan, has become the latest city to sign the Paris Declaration to end the AIDS epidemic in cities, becoming the second city in the country to commit to reaching the 90–90–90 targets by the end of 2020.

15 August 2019
Preparedness, proactiveness and speed are key to tackling humanitarian emergencies

15 August 2019
Preventing HIV and sexual and gender-based violence in peacekeeping and humanitarian operations

14 August 2019
Redefining HIV prevention messages for young people in Latin America

 

UNICEF [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.unicef.org/media/press-releases
Selected Statements, Press Releases, Reports
Statement
G7 leaders must prioritize children in Syria as violence mounts in the northwest
Statement by UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore
23/08/2019

Press release
Venezuela: UNICEF seeks US$70 million to provide humanitarian assistance to 900,000 children
NEW YORK/PANAMA, 20 August 2019 – UNICEF appealed for more than US$70 million to provide life-saving humanitarian assistance to 900,000 children across Venezuela through the end of the year. New funding in the coming weeks is essential for UNICEF and its partners to meet the critical humanitarian needs of children and families inside the country.

“Some 3.2 million children in Venezuela need humanitarian aid as conditions across the country continue to deteriorate,” said UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore. “We are ramping up our work to help children and families who are struggling against food shortages and limited access to essential services like healthcare, safe water and education.”

At least 4.3 million people across Venezuela do not have access to safe drinking water; vaccine-preventable diseases including measles and diphtheria have re-emerged, while yellow fever and malaria are on the rise. An estimated 1.3 million children and adolescents need protection services, while over 1 million children are out of school.

In line with the 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) for Venezuela launched by the United Nations and its partners, UNICEF’s priorities for the remainder of the year include:
:: Providing 800,000 people with access to safe drinking water;
:: Continuing to rehabilitate the vaccine cold chain;
:: Vaccinating more than 1,200,000 children under 5 years against measles;
:: Ensuring treatment for 7,000 children under 5 years suffering from severe or moderate malnutrition;
:: Distributing education materials to 680,000 children aged 4-18 years;
:: Reaching 216,000 children with psychosocial and protection support; and
:: Providing over 170,000 pregnant women and newborn babies with health assistance.

These efforts build on UNICEF’s existing programmatic reach which has increased steadily over the past year to meet the growing needs of the most vulnerable children. Since 2018, UNICEF has shipped nearly 200 tons of basic health, nutrition, education, water and sanitation relief supplies to Venezuela…

Press release
Number of children orphaned or left unaccompanied by Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo rising fast
13/08/2019

Press release
UNICEF welcomes Government of Colombia decision to prevent statelessness for thousands of children born in Colombia to Venezuelan parents
06/08/2019

 

Vaccination Acceptance Research Network (VARN) [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://vaccineacceptance.org/news.html#header1-2r
No new digest content identified.

 

Vaccine Confidence Project [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.vaccineconfidence.org/
No new digest content identified.

 

Vaccine Education Center – Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.chop.edu/centers-programs/vaccine-education-center
No new digest content identified.

 

Wellcome Trust [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://wellcome.ac.uk/news
News | 23 August 2019
Four new appointments to Wellcome’s Board of Governors
Four leaders with significant experience across the finance, advertising, NGO and banking sectors have been appointed to our Board of Governors.

Opinion | 13 August 2019
The most important healthcare tool is trust
by Jeremy Farrar
Wellcome Global Monitor shows that 70% of people trust scientists, doctors, and nurses.

Opinion | 5 August 2019
Asking better questions: how we’re using the discovery process in public engagement
Haidee Bell, Strategic Design and Innovation Lead Wellcome
Discovery can be a useful process to start thinking about how, when and why a challenge should be approached. Haidee Bell explains how we’re using discovery to understand opportunities for public engagement in areas as diverse as mental health research and online health information.

 

The Wistar Institute [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.wistar.org/news/press-releases
Press Release
Aug. 21, 2019
Repeated Semen Exposure Promotes Host Resistance to Infection in Preclinical Model of HIV
Changes in systemic and local tissue responses reduce susceptibility but do not block infection.

 

World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.oie.int/en/for-the-media/press-releases/2019/
No new digest content identified.

 

 

::::::

 

BIO [to 24 Aug 2019]
https://www.bio.org/insights/press-release
No new digest content identified.

 

DCVMN – Developing Country Vaccine Manufacturers Network [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.dcvmn.org/
No new digest content identified.

 

IFPMA [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.ifpma.org/resources/news-releases/
Selected Press Releases, Statements, Publications
22 August 2019
IFPMA Statement on WHO Afro 69 agenda item 12 Framework for provision of essential health
… IFPMA believes that structured, collaborative action on UHC is needed to meet the shared goals of expanding patient access to medicines through innovative solutions, and achieving long-term sustainability of the health sector. This is all the more necessary given the complex mix of interconnected threats to global health which we increasingly face —from poverty and pandemics to conflict and environmental issues.
In the run-up to the UN High Level Meeting in September and as a Core Member of the Private Sector Constituency of UHC 2030, we are pleased to see the Key Asks from the UHC movement going in the right direction. We support in particular the need to uphold quality primary health care, drive forward sustainable financing, and provide an enabling environment to promote improved access to medicines and vaccines, facilitating continued innovation to find new treatments and cures that ensure no-one is left behind.
Now is the time to take action and step forward together in expanding quality, essential health coverage – and to see it not as a cost but as a genuine investment in our human capital, as the drivers of economic development and growth. The opportunities are great in the AFRO region, particularly given the demographic dividend, and we look forward to continuing a constructive and inclusive debate on how to help countries move forward on achieving UHC.

 

PhRMA [to 24 Aug 2019]
http://www.phrma.org/press-room
No new digest content identified.

 

Industry Watch [to 24 Aug 2019]
:: Pfizer Invests Half Billion Dollars to Advance State-of-the-Art Gene Therapy Facility in Sanford, North Carolina
August 21, 2019
NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Pfizer announced today an additional half billion dollar investment for the construction of its state-of-the-art gene therapy manufacturing facility in Sanford, North Carolina. This facility is anticipated to support Pfizer’s continuing investment in gene therapy research and development, similar to Pfizer’s Chapel Hill and Kit Creek, North Carolina research and development sites. This facility would expand the company’s presence in North Carolina, where there are currently more than 3,600 Pfizer colleagues, including 650 in Sanford. The expanded facility is projected to add approximately 300 new jobs…

Journal Watch

Journal Watch
Vaccines and Global Health: The Week in Review continues its weekly scanning of key peer-reviewed journals to identify and cite articles, commentary and editorials, books reviews and other content supporting our focu-s on vaccine ethics and policy. Journal Watch is not intended to be exhaustive, but indicative of themes and issues the Center is actively tracking. We selectively provide full text of some editorial and comment articles that are specifically relevant to our work. Successful access to some of the links provided may require subscription or other access arrangement unique to the publisher.
If you would like to suggest other journal titles to include in this service, please contact David Curry at: david.r.curry@centerforvaccineethicsandpolicy.org

Characteristics associated with human papillomavirus vaccination initiation and completion among young adults

American Journal of Infection Control
September 2019 Volume 47, Issue 9, p1039-1160
http://www.ajicjournal.org/current

 

Major Articles
Characteristics associated with human papillomavirus vaccination initiation and completion among young adults
Xiaofei Ding, Changwei Tian, Hua Wang, Wenming Wang, Xiaoming Luo
p1096–1101
Published online: April 27, 2019

HIV End the Epidemic in the South: The Importance of Measuring Progression to AIDS and Death

American Journal of Public Health
September 2019 109(9)
http://ajph.aphapublications.org/toc/ajph/current

 

AIDS
HIV End the Epidemic in the South: The Importance of Measuring Progression to AIDS and Death
Other Race/Ethnicity, HIV/AIDS, Epidemiology, Statistics/Evaluation/Research, Race/Ethnicity, Mortality, Surveillance
Erika Samoff
109(9), pp. 1159–1160

Ensuring Compliance With Quarantine by Undocumented Immigrants and Other Vulnerable Groups: Public Health Versus Politics

American Journal of Public Health
September 2019 109(9)
http://ajph.aphapublications.org/toc/ajph/current

 

QUARANTINE
Ensuring Compliance With Quarantine by Undocumented Immigrants and Other Vulnerable Groups: Public Health Versus Politics
Immigration, Infections, Health Law, Public Health Practice, Health Policy
Mark A. Rothstein and Christine N. Coughlin
109(9), pp. 1179–1183

Was the First Malaria Vaccine Tested in 1898?

American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume 101, Issue 2, 2019
http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/14761645/101/2

 

Perspective Piece
Was the First Malaria Vaccine Tested in 1898?
G. Dennis Shanks
https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0275
Abstract
Early trials of killed, whole-cell typhoid vaccine indicated a paradoxical, positive effect on malaria infections. British soldiers in India in 1898 reported > 90% decrease in malaria recurrences after receiving an investigational typhoid vaccine despite no intention or expectation to observe such an outcome. In the 1940s, multiple doses of intravenous typhoid vaccine appeared to control parasitemia and limit reinfection in three syphilis patients purposefully infected with Plasmodium vivax. Several modern vaccines (against human papillomavirus, hepatitis B virus, and malaria) use a detoxified lipid A derived from Salmonella as an immune adjuvant. Early typhoid vaccines could have plausibly functioned as an innate immune stimulus, leading to some protection against malaria.

Factors associated with vaccination completion and retention among HIV negative female sex workers enrolled in a simulated vaccine efficacy trial in Kampala, Uganda

BMC Infectious Diseases
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/content
(Accessed 24 Aug 2019)

 

Research article
Factors associated with vaccination completion and retention among HIV negative female sex workers enrolled in a simulated vaccine efficacy trial in Kampala, Uganda
Female sex workers (FSWs) at substantial risk of HIV are potentially a suitable group for HIV prevention trials including vaccine trials. Few HIV vaccine preparatory studies have been conducted among FSWs in S…
Authors: Yunia Mayanja, Andrew Abaasa, Gertrude Namale, Gershim Asiki, Matthew A. Price and Anatoli Kamali
Citation: BMC Infectious Diseases 2019 19:725
Published on: 16 August 2019

Effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease among children with and those without HIV infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis

BMC Infectious Diseases
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/content
(Accessed 24 Aug 2019)

 

Research article
Effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease among children with and those without HIV infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis
HIV-infected children are at a higher risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD) and its mortality, even in the era of antiretroviral therapy. Therefore, an effective vaccination strategy would be beneficial….
Authors: Hossein Molavi Vardanjani, Hodjat Borna and Ali Ahmadi
Citation: BMC Infectious Diseases 2019 19:685
Published on: 5 August 2019

RTS,S/AS01E immunization increases antibody responses to vaccine-unrelated Plasmodium falciparum antigens associated with protection against clinical malaria in African children: a case-control study

BMC Medicine
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmed/content
(Accessed 24 Aug 2019)

 

Research article
RTS,S/AS01E immunization increases antibody responses to vaccine-unrelated Plasmodium falciparum antigens associated with protection against clinical malaria in African children: a case-control study
Vaccination and naturally acquired immunity against microbial pathogens may have complex interactions that influence disease outcomes. To date, only vaccine-specific immune responses have routinely been invest…
Authors: Carlota Dobaño, Itziar Ubillos, Chenjerai Jairoce, Ben Gyan, Marta Vidal, Alfons Jiménez, Rebeca Santano, David Dosoo, Augusto J. Nhabomba, Aintzane Ayestaran, Ruth Aguilar, Nana Aba Williams, Núria Díez-Padrisa, David Lanar, Virander Chauhan, Chetan Chitnis…
Citation: BMC Medicine 2019 17:157
Published on: 14 August 2019

Peri-conceptional or pregnancy exposure of HPV vaccination and the risk of spontaneous abortion: a systematic review and meta-analysis

BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpregnancychildbirth/content
(Accessed 24 Aug 2019)

 

Research article
Peri-conceptional or pregnancy exposure of HPV vaccination and the risk of spontaneous abortion: a systematic review and meta-analysis
To assess whether the peri-conceptional or pregnancy exposure of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination would increase the risk of spontaneous abortion.
Authors: Jing Tan, Yi-quan Xiong, Qiao He, Yan-mei Liu, Wen Wang, Meng Chen, Kang Zou, Xing-hui Liu and Xin Sun
Citation: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2019 19:302
Published on: 19 August 2019

Cost-effectiveness of childhood pneumococcal vaccination program in Ethiopia: results from a quasi-experimental evaluation

BMC Public Health
http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles
(Accessed 24 Aug 2019)

 

Research article
Cost-effectiveness of childhood pneumococcal vaccination program in Ethiopia: results from a quasi-experimental evaluation
Ethiopia was among the 15 countries that, together accounted for 64% of the world’s severe episodes of pneumonia among children below the age of 5 in 2011. To reduce this burden, the 10-valent pneumococcal con…
Authors: Tayue Tateke Kebede, Mikael Svensson, Adamu Addissie, Birger Trollfors and Rune Andersson
Citation: BMC Public Health 2019 19:1078
Published on: 9 August 2019

Measles seroprevalence after reactive vaccination campaigns during the 2015 measles outbreak in four health zones of the former Katanga Province, Democratic Republic of Congo

BMC Public Health
http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles
(Accessed 24 Aug 2019)

 

Research article
Measles seroprevalence after reactive vaccination campaigns during the 2015 measles outbreak in four health zones of the former Katanga Province, Democratic Republic of Congo
Measles continues to circulate in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and the country suffered from several important outbreaks over the last 5 years. Despite a large outbreak starting in the former province of …
Authors: Patrick Keating, Antonio Isidro Carrion Martin, Alexandre Blake, Pauline Lechevalier, Florent Uzzeni, Etienne Gignoux, Chibuzo Okonta, Céline Langendorf, Sheilagh Smit, Steve Ahuka, Melinda Suchard, Elizabeth Pukuta, Marie-Amélie Degail, Lisa Hansen, Jerry Kibanza-Kyungu, Iza Ciglenecki…
Citation: BMC Public Health 2019 19:1153
Published on: 22 August 2019

 

Door – to – door immunization strategy for improving access and utilization of immunization Services in Hard-to-Reach Areas: a case of Migori County, Kenya

BMC Public Health
http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles
(Accessed 24 Aug 2019)

 

Research article
Door – to – door immunization strategy for improving access and utilization of immunization Services in Hard-to-Reach Areas: a case of Migori County, Kenya
Access to quality essential healthcare services and vaccines for all is key to achieving universal health coverage. Inequities driven by differences in place of residence and socio-economic status persist amon…
Authors: Duncan N. Shikuku, Maxwell Muganda, Soudie O. Amunga, Elly O. Obwanda, Alice Muga, Thomas Matete and Paul Kisia
Citation: BMC Public Health 2019 19:1064
Published on: 7 August 2019

A dangerous balancing act: On matters of science, a well‐meaning desire to present all views equally can be an Trojan horse for damaging falsehoods

EMBO Reports
Volume 20 Issue 8 1 August 2019
https://www.embopress.org/toc/14693178/current

 

Science & Society
9 July 2019 Open Access
A dangerous balancing act: On matters of science, a well‐meaning desire to present all views equally can be an Trojan horse for damaging falsehoods
David Robert Grimes
Journalistic impartiality is a laudable aim, but overly rigid application of unbiased reporting may do more harm than good. The issue of false balance in science reporting has severe consequences for health and the environment.

Re-imagining global health through social medicine

Global Public Health
Volume 14, 2019 Issue 10
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rgph20/current

 

Article
Re-imagining global health through social medicine
Vincanne Adams, Dominique Behague, Carlo Caduff, Ilana Löwy & Francisco Ortega
Pages: 1383-1400
Published online: 19 Mar 2019
ABSTRACT
The conceptual and practical work done by social medicine and global health have often overlapped. In this paper, we argue that new efforts to apprehend ‘the social’ in social medicine offer important insights to global health along five lines of critical analysis: (1) reconfigurations of the state and new forms of political activism, (2) philanthrocapitalism and the economisation of life, (3) The economy of attention, (4) anthropogenic climate change, and (5) the geopolitics of North and South.

Improving epidemiological response: lessons learnt from successive outbreaks in Nigeria

International Journal of Epidemiology
Volume 48, Issue 4, August 2019
https://academic.oup.com/ije/issue/48/4

 

Editorial
Improving epidemiological response: lessons learnt from successive outbreaks in Nigeria
Assad Hassan, Muhammad Balogun, Mahmood Dalhat, Chikwe Ihekweazu
International Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 48, Issue 4, August 2019, Pages 1029–1031, https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyy266

Data resource profile: Household Influenza Vaccine Evaluation (HIVE) Study

International Journal of Epidemiology
Volume 48, Issue 4, August 2019
https://academic.oup.com/ije/issue/48/4

 

Data resource profile: Household Influenza Vaccine Evaluation (HIVE) Study
Arnold S Monto, Ryan E Malosh, Richard Evans, Adam S Lauring, Aubree Gordon
International Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 48, Issue 4, August 2019, Pages 1040–1040g, https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyz086