Potential Implications of SARS-CoV-2 Delta Variant Surges for Rural Areas and Hospitals

JAMA
September 21, 2021, Vol 326, No. 11, Pages 993-1116
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

Potential Implications of SARS-CoV-2 Delta Variant Surges for Rural Areas and Hospitals
Sameer S. Kadri, MD, MS; Steven Q. Simpson, MD
free access has multimedia
JAMA. 2021;326(11):1003-1004. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.13941
This Viewpoint discusses the Delta variant of SARS-CoV-2 and suggests potential solutions for institutions, governments, and society as they navigate the potentially rural-dominant surge in infections.

Navigating Ethical Issues in Photovoice: Balancing the Principles of Community-Based Participatory Research Ethics with Institutional Review Board Requirements

Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics
Volume 16 Issue 4, October 2021
http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/jre/current

 

Navigating Ethical Issues in Photovoice: Balancing the Principles of Community-Based Participatory Research Ethics with Institutional Review Board Requirements
Lauren E. McDonald, Moshoula Capous-Desyllas
First Published July 13, 2021; pp. 364–373

A New Era of Indigenous Research: Community-based Indigenous Research Ethics Protocols in Canada

Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics
Volume 16 Issue 4, October 2021
http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/jre/current

A New Era of Indigenous Research: Community-based Indigenous Research Ethics Protocols in Canada
Ashley Hayward, Erynne Sjoblom, Stephanie Sinclair, Jaime Cidro

 

First Published June 9, 2021; pp. 403–417

Cultural Values and Beliefs of Selected Local Communities in Botswana: Implications for Human Subject Research Ethics Practice

Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics
Volume 16 Issue 4, October 2021
http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/jre/current

Cultural Values and Beliefs of Selected Local Communities in Botswana: Implications for Human Subject Research Ethics Practice
Setlhomo Koloi-Keaikitse, Gail Geller, Dudu Jankie, Joseph Ali

 

First Published June 7, 2021; pp. 424–434

Cost-effectiveness of extending the HPV vaccination to boys: a systematic review

Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health
September 2021 – Volume 75 – 9
https://jech.bmj.com/content/75/9

 

Review
Cost-effectiveness of extending the HPV vaccination to boys: a systematic review (23 June, 2021)
Renata Linertová, Carmen Guirado-Fuentes, Javier Mar Medina, Iñaki Imaz-Iglesia, Leticia Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Montserrat Carmona-Rodríguez

Exploring determinants of community pharmacist-led influenza vaccination in a Middle Eastern country: a national web-based cross-sectional study

Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
https://joppp.biomedcentral.com/
[Accessed 25 Sep 2021]

 

Exploring determinants of community pharmacist-led influenza vaccination in a Middle Eastern country: a national web-based cross-sectional study
Authors: Dalal Youssef, Linda Abou-Abbas and Hamad Hassan
Content type: Research
20 September 2021

Artificial Intelligence and Liability in Medicine: Balancing Safety and Innovation

The Milbank Quarterly
A Multidisciplinary Journal of Population Health and Health Policy

 

Volume 99, Issue 3 Pages: 601-852 September 2021
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/14680009/current
Perspectives
Artificial Intelligence and Liability in Medicine: Balancing Safety and Innovation
GEORGE MALIHA, SARA GERKE, I. GLENN COHEN, RAVI B. PARIKH
Pages: 629-647
First Published: 06 April 2021

Resurgence of Ebola virus in 2021 in Guinea suggests a new paradigm for outbreaks

Nature
Volume 597 Issue 7877, 23 September 2021
https://www.nature.com/nature/volumes/597/issues/7875

 

Article | 15 September 2021
Resurgence of Ebola virus in 2021 in Guinea suggests a new paradigm for outbreaks
The viral lineage responsible for the February 2021 outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Guinea is nested within a clade that predominantly consists of genomes sampled during the 2013–2016 epidemic, suggesting that the virus might have re-emerged after a long period of latency within a previously infected individual.
Alpha Kabinet Keita, Fara R. Koundouno, N’. Faly Magassouba

The value of consent for biobanking

Nature Human Behaviour
Volume 5 Issue 9, September 2021
https://www.nature.com/nathumbehav/volumes/5/issues/9

 

News & Views | 23 August 2021
The value of consent for biobanking
Biobanks facilitate large-scale tests of hypotheses that may advance health, but whether biobanking participants adequately comprehend the potential uses of their data should concern researchers and the public. Consent matters because it provides a singular safeguard and a participatory mechanism to influence science’s production of new forms of power.
Elizabeth Bromley, Dmitry Khodyakov

A worldwide assessment of changes in adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviours and hypothesized pandemic fatigue

Nature Human Behaviour
Volume 5 Issue 9, September 2021
https://www.nature.com/nathumbehav/volumes/5/issues/9

 

Article | 03 August 2021
A worldwide assessment of changes in adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviours and hypothesized pandemic fatigue
In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, Petherick, Goldszmidt et al. show that, from March to December 2020, adherence to physical distancing fell worldwide, while mask-wearing adherence increased.
Anna Petherick, Rafael Goldszmidt, Andrew Wood

Safety and Efficacy of NVX-CoV2373 Covid-19 Vaccine

New England Journal of Medicine
September 23, 2021 Vol. 385 No. 13
http://www.nejm.org/toc/nejm/medical-journal

 

Original Article
Safety and Efficacy of NVX-CoV2373 Covid-19 Vaccine
List of authors.
Paul T. Heath, F.R.C.P.C.H., et al. for the 2019nCoV-302 Study Group*
Conclusions
A two-dose regimen of the NVX-CoV2373 vaccine administered to adult participants conferred 89.7% protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection and showed high efficacy against the B.1.1.7 variant. (Funded by Novavax; EudraCT number, 2020-004123-16. opens in new tab.)

Human leishmaniasis vaccines: Use cases, target population and potential global demand

PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
http://www.plosntds.org/

 

Research Article
Human leishmaniasis vaccines: Use cases, target population and potential global demand
Stefano Malvolti, Melissa Malhame, Carsten F. Mantel, Epke A. Le Rutte, Paul M. Kaye
| published 21 Sep 2021 PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0009742

Use of medicinal plants for COVID-19 prevention and respiratory symptom treatment during the pandemic in Cusco, Peru: A cross-sectional survey

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 25 Sep 2021]

 

Use of medicinal plants for COVID-19 prevention and respiratory symptom treatment during the pandemic in Cusco, Peru: A cross-sectional survey
Magaly Villena-Tejada, Ingrid Vera-Ferchau, Anahí Cardona-Rivero, Rina Zamalloa-Cornejo, Maritza Quispe-Florez, Zany Frisancho-Triveño, Rosario C. Abarca-Meléndez, Susan G. Alvarez-Sucari, Christian R. Mejia, Jaime A. Yañez
Research Article | published 22 Sep 2021 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0257165

“Hot-spotting” to improve vaccine allocation by harnessing digital contact tracing technology: An application of percolation theory

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 25 Sep 2021]

 

“Hot-spotting” to improve vaccine allocation by harnessing digital contact tracing technology: An application of percolation theory
Mark D. Penney, Yigit Yargic, Lee Smolin, Edward W. Thommes, Madhur Anand, Chris T. Bauch
Research Article | published 22 Sep 2021 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0256889

Knowledge and preventive actions toward COVID-19, vaccination intent, and health literacy among educators in Japan: An online survey

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 25 Sep 2021]

 

Knowledge and preventive actions toward COVID-19, vaccination intent, and health literacy among educators in Japan: An online survey
Yasue Fukuda, Shuji Ando, Koji Fukuda
Research Article | published 20 Sep 2021 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0257552

Towards an Ọmọlúàbí code of research ethics: Applying a situated, participant-centred virtue ethics framework to fieldwork with disadvantaged populations in diverse cultural settings

Research Ethics
Volume 17 Issue 4, October 2021
http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/reab/current

 

Original Article: Empirical
Towards an Ọmọlúàbí code of research ethics: Applying a situated, participant-centred virtue ethics framework to fieldwork with disadvantaged populations in diverse cultural settings
Bukola Oyinloye
First Published April 16, 2021; pp. 401–422

Negotiating the practicalities of informed consent in the field with children and young people: learning from social science researchers

Research Ethics
Volume 17 Issue 4, October 2021
http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/reab/current

 

Original Article: Empirical
Negotiating the practicalities of informed consent in the field with children and young people: learning from social science researchers
Gina Sherwood, Sarah Parsons
First Published May 9, 2021; pp. 448–463

Predictors of Intention to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine of Health Science Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

Risk Management and Healthcare Policy
https://www.dovepress.com/risk-management-and-healthcare-policy-archive56
[Accessed 25 Sep 2021]

 

Original Research
Predictors of Intention to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine of Health Science Students: A Cross-Sectional Study
Nguyen VT, Nguyen MQ, Le NT, Nguyen TNH, Huynh G
Risk Management and Healthcare Policy 2021, 14:4023-4030
Published Date: 24 September 2021

The human genome

Science
Volume 373| Issue 6562| 24 Sep 2021
https://www.science.org/toc/science/current

 

Special issue – Human Genomics
Introduction to Special Issue
The human genome
BY Laura M. Zahn
23 Sep 2021: 1458-1459
In the two decades since the publication of the human genome, advances in genetics have raced forward. Progress in human genomics has produced insights applicable to treating cancer, identifying drug targets, and diagnosing disease—especially in infants. However, despite these steps forward, we still lack the ability to predict how an individual’s inherited genome contributes to aging, complex disease, and even some monogenic diseases. Furthermore, de novo mutations have increasingly been proposed to affect disease onset and progression.
Although some hoped that having the human genome in hand would fuel a sprint to medical miracles, progress in this field is more accurately characterized as an ongoing relay race of contributions from genomic studies. We now have a better understanding of our history from ancient DNA sequencing, which, along with modern human population genetics, provides an idea of which mutations are tolerated and which are likely pathogenic. The effects of mutations, from single-nucleotide polymorphisms to the loss of full genes, and epigenetic changes that modify gene expression in single cells, tumors, and individuals are being investigated in ever-increasing numbers. These efforts have made it easier to identify how both common and rare variants, which may differ among populations, affect the genetic architecture underlying complex traits and disease.
This special issue examines well-earned successes in applying human genomic research toward understanding human evolution, cancer, polygenic traits, and functional genomics. Yet, there is still much ground ahead to cover.

Vaccine nationalism and the dynamics and control of SARS-CoV-2

Science
Volume 373| Issue 6562| 24 Sep 2021
https://www.science.org/toc/science/current

 

Research Articles
Vaccine nationalism and the dynamics and control of SARS-CoV-2
BY Caroline E. Wagner et al.
24 Sep 2021
Open Access
Stockpiling and control
A triumph that has emerged from the catastrophe of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic has been the rapid development of several potent vaccines. However, 18 months into the pandemic and more than 6 months after vaccine approval, wealthy countries remain the major beneficiaries. Wagner et al. model the consequences of vaccine stockpiling in affluent countries on disease rates in lower- and middle-income countries and the consequences for the eruption of new variants that could jeopardize the early success of vaccines. For countries that can readily access vaccines, it would be better to share vaccines equitably to lower disease burdens in countries with less access, reduce the cost of having to be constantly vigilant for case imports, and minimize virus evolution.
Structured Abstract
INTRODUCTION
The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed massive public health burdens and economic costs, with more than 220 million confirmed cases and more than 4.5 million deaths globally so far. In some countries, the rapid deployment of safe and effective vaccines has reduced cases, hospitalizations, and deaths. However, many regions across the world have little access to doses, and infections are resurging. Furthermore, sustained transmission has led to the emergence of novel variants of the causative severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus with increased transmissibility, and against which vaccines may be less effective. Thus, understanding the effects of vaccine nationalism and allocation on the dynamics and control of SARS-CoV-2 is critical.
RATIONALE
We extend recent models of SARS-CoV-2 dynamics to consider the number of cases and potential for viral evolution in two hypothetical regions, one with high access and one with low access to vaccines. This modified framework allows for variation in the strength and duration of natural and vaccinal immunity, which are aspects of the virus and host response that remain uncertain, thus enabling general explorations of a number of potential scenarios. To model the sharing of vaccines, we begin by only coupling the two regions through their vaccination rates. For different immuno-epidemiological scenarios of SARS-CoV-2, we examine the medium- and long-term dynamics in both regions as a function of the fraction of vaccines shared. Then, we couple the regions through immigration and introduce potential transmission increases due to evolution. We use this coupled model to explore local and combined infection numbers and clinical burdens, as well as potential viral adaptation.
RESULTS
In general, we find that stockpiling vaccines by countries with high availability leads to large increases in infections in countries with low vaccine availability, the magnitude of which depends on the strength and duration of natural and vaccinal immunity. A number of additional subtleties arise when the populations and transmission rates in each country differ depending on evolutionary assumptions and vaccine availability. Furthermore, the movement of infected individuals between countries combined with the possibility of evolutionary increases in viral transmissibility may greatly magnify local and combined infection numbers, suggesting that countries must invest in surveillance strategies to prevent case importation. Dose sharing is likely a high-return strategy because equitable allocation brings nonlinear benefits and also alleviates costs of surveillance (e.g., border testing, genomic surveillance) in settings where doses are sufficient to maintain cases at low numbers. Across a range of immunological scenarios, we find that vaccine sharing is also a powerful tool to decrease the potential for antigenic and transmission evolution of the virus, especially if infections after the waning of natural immunity contribute most to evolutionary potential.
CONCLUSION
Intuitively, our results indicate that unequal vaccine allocation will result in sustained transmission and increased case numbers in regions with low vaccine availability and thus to a higher associated clinical burden compared with a vaccinated population. Under certain scenarios, sustained local transmission could lead to an increased potential for antigenic evolution, which may result in the emergence of variants with novel antigenicity and/or transmissibility and affect epidemiological characteristics globally. Overall, our work underlines the importance of rapid, equitable vaccine deployment and the necessity to export vaccines to regions with low availability in parallel to their becoming available in regions with high access. Coordinated vaccination campaigns across the world, combined with improved surveillance and appropriate nonpharmaceutical interventions to prevent case importation, are imperative.

Drug repurposing: Misconceptions, challenges, and opportunities for academic researchers

Science Translational Medicine
Volume 13| Issue 612| 22 Sep 2021
https://www.science.org/toc/stm/current

 

Reviews
Drug repurposing: Misconceptions, challenges, and opportunities for academic researchers
BY C. Glenn Begley et al.
22 Sep 2021
NO ACCESS
The assumption that drug repurposing efficiently delivers new drugs ignores the realities of drug development required to achieve regulatory approval.

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus – The need for global proactive surveillance, sequencing and modeling

Travel Medicine and Infectious Diseases
Volume 43 September–October 2021
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/travel-medicine-and-infectious-disease/vol/43/suppl/C

 

Editorial No access
Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus – The need for global proactive surveillance, sequencing and modeling
Jaffar A. Al-Tawfiq, Eskild Petersen, Ziad A. Memish, Stanley Perlman, Alimuddin Zumla
Article 102118

Launching COVID-19 vaccination in Saudi Arabia: Lessons learned, and the way forward

Travel Medicine and Infectious Diseases
Volume 43 September–October 2021
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/travel-medicine-and-infectious-disease/vol/43/suppl/C

 

Discussion Full text access
Launching COVID-19 vaccination in Saudi Arabia: Lessons learned, and the way forward
Abdullah Assiri, Jaffar A. Al-Tawfiq, Monira Alkhalifa, Hessa Al Duhailan, … Hani Jokhdar
Article 102119

A global agenda for older adult immunization in the COVID-19 era: A roadmap for action

Vaccine
Volume 39, Issue 37 Pages 5233-5332 (31 August 2021)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/vaccine/vol/39/issue/37

 

Conference info Abstract only
A global agenda for older adult immunization in the COVID-19 era: A roadmap for action
Lois A. Privor-Dumm, Gregory A. Poland, Jane Barratt, David N. Durrheim, … Paolo Bonanni
Pages 5240-5250

Effectiveness of a single-dose mass dengue vaccination in Cebu, Philippines: A case-control study

Vaccine
Volume 39, Issue 37 Pages 5233-5332 (31 August 2021)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/vaccine/vol/39/issue/37

 

Research article Open access
Effectiveness of a single-dose mass dengue vaccination in Cebu, Philippines: A case-control study
Michelle Ylade, Kristal An Agrupis, Jedas Veronica Daag, Maria Vinna Crisostomo, … Anna Lena Lopez
Pages 5318-5325

Worldwide Vaccination Willingness for COVID-19: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Vaccines
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/vaccines

 

Open Access Systematic Review
Worldwide Vaccination Willingness for COVID-19: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Kimberly R. Nehal, Lieke M. Steendam, Maiza Campos Ponce, Marinka van der Hoeven and
G. Suzanne A. Smit
Vaccines 2021, 9(10), 1071; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9101071 (registering DOI) – 24 Sep 2021
Abstract
Countries across the globe are currently experiencing a third or fourth wave of SARS-CoV-2 infections; therefore, the need for effective vaccination campaigns is higher than ever. However, effectiveness of these campaigns in disease reduction is highly dependent on vaccination uptake and coverage in […]

COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy and Resistance in India Explored through a Population-Based Longitudinal Survey

Vaccines
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/vaccines

 

Open Access Article
COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy and Resistance in India Explored through a Population-Based Longitudinal Survey
by Srikanth Umakanthan, Sonal Patil, Naveen Subramaniam and Ria Sharma
Vaccines 2021, 9(10), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9101064 (registering DOI) – 24 Sep 2021
Abstract
Background: The World Health Organization has recommended that individual governments identify vaccine hesitancy areas. It is proposed that the governments, with the aid of local organizations, educate and implement social insights on the vaccination so that high population levels are covered with this […

Is It All a Conspiracy? Conspiracy Theories and People’s Attitude to COVID-19 Vaccination

Vaccines
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/vaccines

 

Open Access Article
Is It All a Conspiracy? Conspiracy Theories and People’s Attitude to COVID-19 Vaccination
by Zheng Yang, Xi Luo and Hepeng Jia
Vaccines 2021, 9(10), 1051; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9101051 – 22 Sep 2021
Abstract
A large body of research has found that people’s beliefs in conspiracy theories about infectious diseases negatively impacts their health behaviors concerning vaccination. Conspiracy belief-based vaccination hesitancy has become more rampant after the global outbreak of COVID-19. However, some important questions remain unanswered. […]

medRxiv

medRxiv
medRxiv is a free online archive and distribution server for complete but unpublished manuscripts (preprints) in the medical, clinical, and related health sciences. Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been certified by peer review. They should not be relied on to guide clinical practice or health-related behavior and should not be reported in news media as established information. medRxiv is for the distribution of preprints – complete but unpublished manuscripts – that describe human health research conducted, analyzed, and interpreted according to scientific principles…
https://www.medrxiv.org/content/about-medrxiv
[Accessed 25 Sep 2021]

Selected Content
A systematic review of COVID-19 vaccine efficacy and effectiveness against SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease
Melissa M Higdon, Brian Wahl, Carli B Jones, Joseph G Rosen, Shaun A Truelove, Anurima Baidya, Anjalika A Nande, Parisa A ShamaeiZadeh, Karoline K Walter, Daniel R Feikin, Minal K Patel, Maria Deloria Knoll, Alison L Hill
medRxiv 2021.09.17.21263549; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.17.21263549

Predicting the Effectiveness of the Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2 Vaccine from SARS-CoV-2 Variants Neutralisation Data
Oleg Volkov, Svetlana Borozdenkova, Alexander Gray
medRxiv 2021.09.06.21263160; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.06.21263160

Consequences of COVID-19 vaccine allocation inequity in Chicago
Sharon Zeng, Kenley M. Pelzer, Robert D. Gibbons, Monica E. Peek, William F. Parker
medRxiv 2021.09.22.21263984; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.22.21263984

Real-world Effectiveness of 2-dose SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination in Kidney Transplant Recipients
Caitríona M. McEvoy, Anna Lee, Paraish S. Misra, Gerald Lebovic, Ron Wald, Darren A. Yuen
medRxiv 2021.09.21.21263457; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.21.21263457

Effectiveness of vaccination in preventing severe SARS CoV-2 infection in South India-a hospital-based cross-sectional study
A Charles Pon Ruban, Aazmi M, Shantaraman K.
medRxiv 2021.09.17.21263670; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.17.21263670

Effectiveness of COVID-19 Vaccines: Eight Months Post Single Dose Vaccination
Naif Khalaf Alharbi, Jaffar A. Al-Tawfiq, Suliman Alghnam, Amal Alwehaibe, Abrar Alasmari, Suliman A. Alsagaby, Faizah Alotaibi, Faisal Alsubaie, Majid Alshomrani, Fayssal M. Farahat, Mohammad Bosaeed, Ahmad Alharbi, Omar Aldibasi, Abdullah M. Assiri
medRxiv 2021.09.18.21263262; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.18.21263262

Impact of COVID-19 on the quality of life (QoL) of patients living with Sickle Cell Disorder (SCD) IN Lagos, Nigeria
Annette Akinsete, Larry Ajuwon, Michael Ottun, Hammed Adelabu, Jorden Veeneman
medRxiv 2021.09.17.21263748; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.17.21263748

Estimating vaccine confidence levels among healthcare staff and students of a tertiary institution in South Africa
Elizabeth O. Oduwole, Tonya Esterhuizen, Hassan Mahomed, Charles S. Wiysonge
medRxiv 2021.09.17.21263739; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.17.21263739

Stakeholders’ views on an institutional dashboard with metrics for responsible research
Tamarinde Haven, Martin Holst, Daniel Strech
medRxiv 2021.09.16.21263493; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.16.21263493

COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in India: An Exploratory Analysis
Sandip K. Agarwal, Maharnab Naha
medRxiv 2021.09.15.21263646; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.15.21263646

Toward Using Twitter Data to Monitor Covid-19 Vaccine Safety in Pregnancy
Ari Z. Klein, Karen O’Connor, Graciela Gonzalez-Hernandez
medRxiv 2021.09.15.21263653; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.15.21263653

COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and vaccine passports: Vaccination or restriction?
Shohei Okamoto, Kazuki Kamimura, Kohei Komamura
medRxiv 2021.09.15.21263559; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.15.21263559

Immunogenicity and safety of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in people living with HIV-1
Yanmeng Feng, Yifan Zhang, Zhangyufan He, Haojie Huang, Xiangxiang Tian, Gang Wang, Daihong Chen, Yanqin Ren, Liqiu Jia, Wanhai Wang, Jing Wu, Lingyun Shao, Wenhong Zhang, Heng Tang, Yanmin Wan
medRxiv 2021.09.14.21263556; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.14.21263556

Monitoring the COVID-19 immunisation programme through a National Immunisation Management System – England’s experience
Elise Tessier, Julia Stowe, Camille Tsang, Yuma Rai, Eleanor Clarke, Anissa Lakhani, Ashley Makwana, Heather Heard, Tim Rickeard, Freja Kirsebom, Catherine Quinot, Shreya Lakhani, Linda Power, Michael Edelstein, Andy Evans, Mary Ramsay, Jamie Lopez-Bernal, Joanne White, Charlotte Gower, Nick Andrews, Colin Campbell
medRxiv 2021.09.14.21263578; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.14.21263578

Monitoring the COVID-19 immunisation programme through a National Immunisation Management System – England’s experience
Elise Tessier, Julia Stowe, Camille Tsang, Yuma Rai, Eleanor Clarke, Anissa Lakhani, Ashley Makwana, Heather Heard, Tim Rickeard, Freja Kirsebom, Catherine Quinot, Shreya Lakhani, Linda Power, Michael Edelstein, Andy Evans, Mary Ramsay, Jamie Lopez-Bernal, Joanne White, Charlotte Gower, Nick Andrews, Colin Campbell
medRxiv 2021.09.14.21263578; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.14.21263578

COVID-19 Acceleration and Vaccine Status in France – August 2021
Christelle Baunez, Mickael Degoulet, Stéphane Luchini, Patrick A. Pintus, Miriam Teschl
medRxiv 2021.09.18.21263773; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.18.21263773

Covid-19 in the Phase 3 Trial of mRNA-1273 During the Delta-variant Surge
Lindsey R. Baden, Hana M. El Sahly, Brandon Essink, Dean Follmann, Kathleen M. Neuzil, Allison August, Heather Clouting, Gabrielle Fortier, Weiping Deng, Shu Han, Xiaoping Zhao, Brett Leav, Carla Talarico, Bethany Girard, Yamuna D. Paila, Joanne E. Tomassini, Florian Schödel, Rolando Pajon, Honghong Zhou, Rituparna Das, Jacqueline Miller
medRxiv 2021.09.17.21263624; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.17.21263624

The Relationship of Vaccine Uptake and COVID-19 Infections among Nursing Home Staff and Residents in Missouri
Stephen Scroggins, Matthew Ellis, Enbal Shacham
medRxiv 2021.09.16.21263714; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.16.21263714

COVID-19 vaccination rates among health care workers by immigrant background. A nation-wide registry study from Norway
Kristian Bandlien Kraft, Ingeborg Elgersma, Trude Marie Lyngstad, Petter Elstrøm, Kjetil Telle
medRxiv 2021.09.17.21263619; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.17.21263619

Correlates of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance, hesitancy and refusal among employees of a safety net California county health system with an early and aggressive vaccination program: Results from a cross-sectional survey
Nicole M. Gatto, Jerusha E. Lee, Donatella Massai, Susanna Zamarripa, Bijan Sasaninia, Dhruv Khurana, Kelsey Michaels, Deborah Freund, Judi Nightingale, Anthony Firek, for the Riverside University Health System (RUHS) Comparative Effectiveness and Clinical Outcomes Research Center (CECORC)-Claremont Graduate University (CGU) COVID-19 Research Group
medRxiv 2021.09.14.21263588; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.14.21263588

Think Tanks et al

Think Tanks et al
 
 
Brookings [to 25 Sep 2021]
http://www.brookings.edu/
Op-Ed
Africa must produce its own vaccines
Landry Signé
Thursday, September 23, 2021
 
 
Center for Global Development [to 25 Sep 2021]
http://www.cgdev.org/page/press-center
Accessed 25 Sep 2021
Takeaways from the White House COVID Summit: Ending this Pandemic and Preparing for the Next
September 24, 2021
The global COVID response effort has been in desperate need of a shot in the arm. Yesterday’s US-hosted Global COVID-19 Summit, on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly, aimed to provide just that. Here are a few of the highlights, and what was missing.
Amanda Glassman and Erin Collinson

Early COVID-19 Vaccination Not Only Prevents Deaths, But Can Save Money Too, New Findings Show
September 24, 2021
In January 2021, India embarked on one of the world’s
Hiral Anil Shah, Nimalan Arinaminpathy and Javier Guzman

Four Priorities for the New Leader of USAID’s Global Health Bureau
September 22, 2021
Next week, Atul Gawande, the prominent author, surgeon, researcher, and—most recently—presidential nominee to lead USAID’s Bureau for Global Health
Julia Kaufman, Sarah Rose and Janeen Madan Keller
 
 
Chatham House [to 25 Sep 2021]
https://www.chathamhouse.org/
Accessed 25 Sep 2021
[No new digest content identified]

 
 
CSIS
https://www.csis.org/
Accessed 25 Sep 2021
Blog Post
Russia’s New Frontier in Southeast Asia: Vaccine Diplomacy
September 21, 2021

Report
Beyond COVAX: The Importance of Public-Private Partnerships for Covid-19 Vaccine Delivery to Developing Countries
September 13, 2021 | Conor M. Savoy Public-private partnerships are critical to meeting the demand in developing countries to rapidly scale supply and distribution systems for Covid-19 vaccines in support of existing multilateral efforts such as COVAX.

 
 

Kaiser Family Foundation
https://www.kff.org/search/?post_type=press-release
[No new digest content identified]

 
 

Rand [to 25 Sep 2021]
https://www.rand.org/pubs.html
Selected Research Reports, Featured Journal Articles
Report
Identifying Strategies to Boost COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance in the United States
Sep 9, 2021
This report recommends strategies to help boost COVID-19 vaccine acceptance in the United States in order to reach herd immunity and end the pandemic.
Florian F. Schmitzberger, Kirstin W. Scott, Wilson Nham, Kusum Mathews, Lucy Schulson, Sydney Fouche, Nasma Berri, Alex Shehab, Ashwin Gupta, Rama A. Salhi, Neil Kamdar, Jennifer Bouey, Mahshid Abir
 
 
Rockefeller Foundation [to 25 Sep 2021]
https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/
Selected Reports/Press Releases
Sep 14 2021 Press Releases
Wellcome and The Rockefeller Foundation Fund New data.org initiative, Epiverse, Analyzing Emergence and Spread of Pandemics
data.org to lead global, distributed pandemic analysis with a privacy-preserving approach 
New York | September 14, 2021 Today, data.org is announcing funding from Wellcome and The Rockefeller Foundation’s pandemic prevention institute …

Sep 14 2021 Press Releases
Over 90% of U.S. Employers Surveyed Require or Encourage Covid-19 Vaccinations
Arizona State University Survey of Employers, supported by The Rockefeller Foundation, shows companies are increasing support for Covid-19 vaccinations and testing to keep employees safe. PHOENIX, Ariz. | Sept. 14, 2021 …
 
 
World Economic Forum [to 25 Sep 2021]
https://agenda.weforum.org/news/
Media
India Completes First Drone Delivery of Vaccines, Start of New Pilot Programme with World Economic Forum
News 25 Sep 2021

Majority Want to Prioritize Equitable Access to COVID-19 Vaccines Before Boosters
News 10 Sep 2021
Health experts say at least 60% of world’s population needs to be vaccinated by 2022 to get the current pandemic under control – but only 0.4% of doses have been administered in low-income countries
Majority would receive a booster shot, but think priority goes to people yet to have a full dose
Read the full report

Vaccines and Global Health: The Week in Review :: 18 September 2021

Vaccines and Global Health: The Week in Review is a weekly digest  summarizing news, events, announcements, peer-reviewed articles and research in the global vaccine ethics and policy space. Content is aggregated from key governmental, NGO, international organization and industry sources, key peer-reviewed journals, and other media channels. This summary proceeds from the broad base of themes and issues monitored by the Center for Vaccine Ethics & Policy in its work: it is not intended to be exhaustive in its coverage. You are viewing the blog version of our weekly digest, typically comprised of between 30 and 40 posts below all dated with the current issue date

.– Request an Email Summary: Vaccines and Global Health : The Week in Review is published as a single email summary, scheduled for release each Saturday evening before midnight (EDT in the U.S.). If you would like to receive the email version, please send your request to david.r.curry@centerforvaccineethicsandpolicy.org.

– pdf version A pdf of the current issue is available here: 

– blog edition: comprised of the approx. 35+ entries posted below.

– Twitter:  Readers can also follow developments on twitter: @vaxethicspolicy.
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– Links:  We endeavor to test each link as we incorporate it into any post, but recognize that some links may become “stale” as publications and websites reorganize content over time. We apologize in advance for any links that may not be operative. We believe the contextual information in a given post should allow retrieval, but please contact us as above for assistance if necessary.

Support this knowledge-sharing service: Your financial support helps us cover our costs and to address a current shortfall in our annual operating budget. Click here to donate and thank you in advance for your contribution.

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David R. Curry, MS
Executive Director
Center for Vaccine Ethics and Policy