Global research activity on mathematical modeling of transmission and control of 23 selected infectious disease outbreak

Globalization and Health
http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/
[Accessed 22 Jan 2022]

 

Global research activity on mathematical modeling of transmission and control of 23 selected infectious disease outbreak
Mathematical analysis and modeling allow policymakers to understand and predict the dynamics of an infectious disease under several different scenarios. The current study aimed to analyze global research activity on mathematical modeling of transmission and control of several infectious diseases with a known history of serious outbreaks.
Authors: Waleed M. Sweileh
Content type: Research
21 January 2022

An Overview of Cell and Gene Therapy Development in China

Human Gene Therapy
Volume 33, Issue 1-2 / January 2022
https://www.liebertpub.com/toc/hum/33/1-2

 

Review Free
An Overview of Cell and Gene Therapy Development in China
Yitong Wang, Tingting Qiu, Shuyao Liang, and Mondher Toumi
Pages:14–24
Published Online:6 September 2021
https://doi.org/10.1089/hum.2021.126
Abstract
China, the first country worldwide to approve a gene therapy in 2003, almost lost the advantage for a head start in cell and gene therapy (CGT) development due to a lack of clear and strict regulatory frameworks. The rapid advancements of CGTs’ development worldwide as well as their therapeutic potential have triggered the government to conduct a spate of regulatory reforms to promote normative development of CGTs in China. Encouraged by policy support, the remarkable progress for CGTs in China has been observed over the past few years, thereby catapulting China back into the forefront of CGTs worldwide. This article aims to provide an overview of regulatory reforms, the current development landscape of CGTs, as well as key contributors and challenges for CGT development in China.

Localisation and local humanitarian action

Humanitarian Exchange Magazine
Number 79, May 2021
https://odihpn.org/magazine/localisation-and-local-humanitarian-action/

 

Localisation and local humanitarian action
by HPN October 2020
The theme of this edition of Humanitarian Exchange is localisation+ and local humanitarian action. Five years ago this week, donors, United Nations (UN) agencies,  non-governmental organisations (NGOs), the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) committed within the Grand Bargain to increase multi-year investments in the institutional capacities of local and national responders, and to provide at least 25% of humanitarian funding to them as directly as possible. Since then, there is increasing consensus at policy and normative level, underscored by the Covid-19 pandemic, that local leadership should be supported.  Localisation has gone from a fringe conversation among policy-makers and aid agencies in 2016 to a formal priority under the Grand Bargain. Wider global movements on anti-racism and decolonisation have also brought new momentum to critical reflections on where power, knowledge and capacity reside in the humanitarian system. Yet progress has been slow and major gaps remain between the rhetoric around humanitarian partnerships, funding and coordination and practices on the ground.

Immunogenicity of Extended mRNA SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Dosing Intervals

JAMA
January 18, 2022, Vol 327, No. 3, Pages 199-294
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

Research Letter
Immunogenicity of Extended mRNA SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Dosing Intervals
Brian Grunau, MD, MHSc; David M. Goldfarb, MD; Michael Asamoah-Boaheng, MPhil; et al.
free access has active quiz
JAMA. 2022;327(3):279-281. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.21921
This study investigates the immunogenicity of extended mRNA vaccine dosing intervals.

Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children by COVID-19 Vaccination Status of Adolescents in France

JAMA
January 18, 2022, Vol 327, No. 3, Pages 199-294
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children by COVID-19 Vaccination Status of Adolescents in France
Michael Levy, MD, PhD; Morgan Recher, MD, PhD; Hervé Hubert, MD, PhD; et al.
free access has active quiz
JAMA. 2022;327(3):281-283. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.23262
This study examines the risk of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children among those aged 12 years or older by COVID-19 vaccination status during September 2021 and October 2021 in France.

A National Strategy for the “New Normal” of Life With COVID

JAMA
January 18, 2022, Vol 327, No. 3, Pages 199-294
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

Viewpoint
A National Strategy for the “New Normal” of Life With COVID
Ezekiel J. Emanuel, MD, PhD; Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH; Celine R. Gounder, MD, ScM
free access has multimedia has audio
JAMA. 2022;327(3):211-212. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.24282
This Viewpoint discusses how US policy makers should address how the nation can move forward as the pandemic persists.

A National Strategy for COVID-19 Testing, Surveillance, and Mitigation Strategies

JAMA
January 18, 2022, Vol 327, No. 3, Pages 199-294
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

A National Strategy for COVID-19 Testing, Surveillance, and Mitigation Strategies
David Michaels, PhD, MPH; Ezekiel J. Emanuel, MD, PhD; Rick A. Bright, PhD
free access has multimedia has audio
JAMA. 2022;327(3):213-214. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.24168
This Viewpoint discusses the areas on which the US needs to improve its public health infrastructure in order to reduce COVID-19 transmission and achieve a “new normal”: testing, surveillance, masking, and ventilation.

A National Strategy for COVID-19 Medical Countermeasures Vaccines and Therapeutics

JAMA
January 18, 2022, Vol 327, No. 3, Pages 199-294
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

A National Strategy for COVID-19 Medical Countermeasures Vaccines and Therapeutics
Luciana L. Borio, MD; Rick A. Bright, PhD; Ezekiel J. Emanuel, MD, PhD
free access has multimedia has audio
JAMA. 2022;327(3):215-216. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.24165
This Viewpoint proposes a multistep plan that US can implement to achieve a “new normal” of living, in which the combined risk of all viral respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19, does not exceed the risk during prepandemic years.

The First 2 Years of COVID-19Lessons to Improve Preparedness for the Next Pandemic

JAMA
January 18, 2022, Vol 327, No. 3, Pages 199-294
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

The First 2 Years of COVID-19Lessons to Improve Preparedness for the Next Pandemic
Jennifer B. Nuzzo, DrPH, SM; Lawrence O. Gostin, JD
free access
JAMA. 2022;327(3):217-218. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.24394
This Viewpoint examines the lessons that the COVID-19 pandemic can provide public health institutions and health care personnel to advance preparedness, detection, and response regarding future pandemics.

The Pandemic Preparedness Program Reimagining Public Health

JAMA
January 18, 2022, Vol 327, No. 3, Pages 199-294
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/currentissue

 

The Pandemic Preparedness ProgramReimagining Public Health
Eli Y. Adashi, MD, MS; I. Glenn Cohen, JD
free access
JAMA. 2022;327(3):219-220. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.23656
This Viewpoint reviews the leading objectives of the pandemic preparedness proposal, discusses the outcome of comparable past federal efforts, and emphasizes the imperative of intragovernmental coordination.

A disease severity scale for the evaluation of vaccine and other preventive or therapeutic interventions for travellers’ diarrhoea

Journal of Travel Medicine
Volume 29, Issue 1, January 2022
https://academic.oup.com/jtm/issue

 

Editor’s Choice
A disease severity scale for the evaluation of vaccine and other preventive or therapeutic interventions for travellers’ diarrhoea
Nicole Maier, PhD, Mark S Riddle, MD, DrPH, Ramiro Gutiérrez, MD, Jamie A Fraser, MPH, Patrick Connor, MD
Journal of Travel Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1, January 2022, taab139, https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taab139

Antimicrobial resistance: time to repurpose the Global Fund

The Lancet
Jan 22, 2022 Volume 399 Number 10322 p335-410
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/issue/current

 

Editorial
Antimicrobial resistance: time to repurpose the Global Fund
The Lancet
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major cause of death globally, with a burden likely to be higher than that of HIV or malaria, according to the most comprehensive assessment of bacterial AMR to date published in The Lancet. The data presented in this analysis are striking: in 2019, the deaths of 4·95 million people were associated with drug-resistant bacterial infections. 1·27 million deaths were directly caused by AMR. For the first time, the study provides estimates for 204 countries and territories, as well as data for the regional impacts of AMR. This study also reports details of AMR burden for 23 bacterial pathogens—Escherichia coli is accountable for the most deaths—and 88 pathogen–drug combinations, with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus causing the highest number of deaths. These new findings are pivotal to inform location-specific policy decisions and clinical practice.

The threat of AMR has long been signalled. And the steps needed to tackle AMR—boosting public awareness, better surveillance, improved diagnostics, more rational use of antibiotics, access to clean water and sanitation, embracing One Health, and investments in new antimicrobials and vaccines—have been consistently recommended in reports such as The Lancet Infectious Diseases Commission on Antibiotic Resistance in 2013 and the O’Neill report in 2016. There have been some noteworthy responses during the past decade. The Global Antimicrobial Resistance and Use Surveillance System was launched by WHO in 2015. The Fleming Fund (an aid programme supporting 24 countries across Africa and Asia to tackle AMR) was established in 2015. In December, 2021, G7 Finance Ministers issued statements to support antibiotic development.

But action has been episodic and uneven, resulting in global inequities in AMR. Sub-Saharan Africa and south Asia have the highest burden of AMR according to the new study, likely driven by high infection rates and a lack of access to antibiotics, compounded by serious data gaps. Innovation has been extremely slow. Vaccines are available for only one of the six leading pathogens described in the study. The clinical pipeline for antibiotics is too small to tackle the increasing emergence and spread of AMR. A lot of research has described the problem of AMR, but not enough has been done to study the solutions or how to change the political conversation.

National leaders now have an obligation to move AMR to a higher position in their political agendas. Research efforts should be accelerated to address knowledge and innovation gaps and to inform policy and practices. Access to effective antibiotics must be ensured. Above all, AMR must be seen as a global issue, which needs a globally coherent plan with a One Health approach. AMR has too often been viewed as an abstract risk to health, a potential cause of illness and death at some point in the future. This way of thinking makes it easy to ignore. But the new comprehensive estimates show that AMR is killing large numbers of people now. The harms of AMR are with us today. The COVID-19 pandemic could even accelerate the problem of AMR due to antibiotic misuse and prolonged hospital stays. This fact demands that actions to address AMR be scaled up urgently.

One immediate opportunity must be seized. Later this year, The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria will hold its Seventh Replenishment meeting. The focus for inviting donor investment is likely to remain on the three diseases that have been the hallmark of its success. However, the Fund is actively considering how to broaden its remit in response to a very different global context—notably, the need for further measures to strengthen pandemic preparedness and create resilient health systems in an era of climate crisis. 2022 is also the 20th anniversary of The Global Fund’s inception. Now is the right moment to review its fundamental purpose. The Fund was established to invest in programmes to end the infectious diseases that cause the greatest burden of illness and death, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. It has proven itself a highly effective instrument for protecting susceptible populations from preventable and treatable diseases. The existing burden of AMR and its future threat should be an urgent stimulus to revise and widen The Global Fund’s mission. It is now time for the Fund to embrace AMR as one of its core responsibilities. And donors should invest generously in such a renewed and reinvigorated Fund.

COVID-19 vaccine strategies must focus on severe disease and global equity

The Lancet
Jan 22, 2022 Volume 399 Number 10322 p335-410
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/issue/current

 

Viewpoint
COVID-19 vaccine strategies must focus on severe disease and global equity
Peter B McIntyre, et al.
[Excerpt]
Global COVID-19 vaccine strategies in 2022
:: COVID-19 vaccine strategies should continue to prioritise prevention of severe disease
:: Variants of concern such as delta and potentially omicron render strategies aimed at SARS-CoV-2 transmission unlikely to have more than a short-term effect on preventing severe COVID-19
:: In countries with a high prevalence of previous infection and a low proportion of the population being older than 60 years prioritising delivery of the first dose will have the greatest effect on preventing severe COVID-19
:: In countries with a low prevalence of previous infection and a high proportion of the population being older than 60 years, protection against severe disease in adults requires at least two doses
:: In people who are severely immunocompromised or older than 60 years, evidence supports booster doses of mRNA or adenoviral vector vaccines to prevent severe disease; booster doses for all adults could compromise timely global availability of first doses

Single-cell immunology of SARS-CoV-2 infection

Nature Biotechnology
Volume 40 Issue 1, January 2022
https://www.nature.com/nbt/volumes/40/issues/1

 

Review Article | 20 December 2021
Single-cell immunology of SARS-CoV-2 infection
This Review provides an overview of existing studies using single-cell technologies to provide insights over the immune responses and molecular mechanisms at work in COVID-19.
Yuan Tian, Lindsay N. Carpp, Raphael Gottardo

Integrated analysis of plasma and single immune cells uncovers metabolic changes in individuals with COVID-19

Nature Biotechnology
Volume 40 Issue 1, January 2022
https://www.nature.com/nbt/volumes/40/issues/1

 

Analysis | 06 September 2021
Integrated analysis of plasma and single immune cells uncovers metabolic changes in individuals with COVID-19
The immune cells of individuals with COVID-19 show metabolic changes.
Jihoon W. Lee, Yapeng Su, James R. Heath

Incorporating Equity Concerns in Cost-Effectiveness Analyses: A Systematic Literature Review

PharmacoEconomics
Volume 40, issue 1, January 2022
https://link.springer.com/journal/40273/volumes-and-issues/40-1

 

Systematic Review
Incorporating Equity Concerns in Cost-Effectiveness Analyses: A Systematic Literature Review
Authors (first, second and last of 4) Thomas Ward, Ruben E. Mujica-Mota, Antonieta Medina-Lara
Published: 29 October 2021

COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and associated factors according to sex: A population-based survey in Salvador, Brazil

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 22 Jan 2022]

 

Research Article
COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and associated factors according to sex: A population-based survey in Salvador, Brazil
Nivison Nery Jr., Juan P. Aguilar Ticona, Cristiane W. Cardoso, Ana Paula Pitanga Barbuda Prates, Helena Cristina Alves Vieira, Andrea Salvador de Almeida, Mirela Maisa da Silva Souza, Olivete Borba dos Reis, Maysa Pellizzaro, Moyra Machado Portilho, Renan Rosa da Anunciação, Renato Victoriano, Rosangela Oliveira dos Anjos, Hernán Dario Argibay, Douglas Oliveira Carmo Lima, Isadora Lima Mesquita, Wesley Mota Conceição, Perla Machado Santana, Elaine Carvalho Oliveira, Pamela Santos Nascimento Santana, Claudia Ida Brodskyn, Deborah Bittencourt Mothé Fraga, Manuela da Silva Solcà, Mitermayer Galvão Reis, Federico Costa, Guilherme S. Ribeiro
Research Article | published 21 Jan 2022 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0262649

Vaccines to prevent COVID-19: A living systematic review with Trial Sequential Analysis and network meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 22 Jan 2022]

 

Vaccines to prevent COVID-19: A living systematic review with Trial Sequential Analysis and network meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials
Steven Kwasi Korang, Elena von Rohden, Areti Angeliki Veroniki, Giok Ong, Owen Ngalamika, Faiza Siddiqui, Sophie Juul, Emil Eik Nielsen, Joshua Buron Feinberg, Johanne Juul Petersen, Christian Legart, Afoke Kokogho, Mathias Maagaard, Sarah Klingenberg, Lehana Thabane, Ariel Bardach, Agustín Ciapponi, Allan Randrup Thomsen, Janus C. Jakobsen, Christian Gluud
Research Article | published 21 Jan 2022 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0260733

The impact of free vaccination policies under the Korean Influenza National Immunization Program: Trends in influenza vaccination rates in South Korea from 2010 to 2019

PLoS One
http://www.plosone.org/
[Accessed 22 Jan 2022]

 

The impact of free vaccination policies under the Korean Influenza National Immunization Program: Trends in influenza vaccination rates in South Korea from 2010 to 2019
Jeongmin Seo, Juwon Lim
Research Article | published 20 Jan 2022 PLOS ONE
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0262594

Ethics and society review: Ethics reflection as a precondition to research funding

PNAS – Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States
December 28, 2021; vol. 118 no. 52
https://www.pnas.org/content/118/52

 

Social Sciences
Open Access
Ethics and society review: Ethics reflection as a precondition to research funding
Michael S. Bernstein, Margaret Levi, David Magnus, Betsy A. Rajala, Debra Satz, and Charla Waeiss
PNAS December 28, 2021 118 (52) e2117261118; https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2117261118
Significance
Research fields that hold transformative possibilities for improving the human condition also raise risks of negative ethical and societal outcomes. These ethical and societal risks fall outside the purview of most research reviews. We introduce an iterative review process that draws these fields into reflection and mitigation of ethical and societal risks by conditioning access to grant funding on completion of the process. A 1-y evaluation of our approach with an artificial intelligence funding program at our university suggests that this approach is well-received by researchers and positively influenced the design of their research. This process has also generated lists of common risks and mitigation strategies, to provide scaffolding for future processes.
Abstract
Researchers in areas as diverse as computer science and political science must increasingly navigate the possible risks of their research to society. However, the history of medical experiments on vulnerable individuals influenced many research ethics reviews to focus exclusively on risks to human subjects rather than risks to human society. We describe an Ethics and Society Review board (ESR), which fills this moral gap by facilitating ethical and societal reflection as a requirement to access grant funding: Researchers cannot receive grant funding from participating programs until the researchers complete the ESR process for their proposal. Researchers author an initial statement describing their proposed research’s risks to society, subgroups within society, and globally and commit to mitigation strategies for these risks. An interdisciplinary faculty panel iterates with the researchers to refine these risks and mitigation strategies. We describe a mixed-method evaluation of the ESR over 1 y, in partnership with a large artificial intelligence grant program at our university. Surveys and interviews of researchers who interacted with the ESR found 100% (95% CI: 87 to 100%) were willing to continue submitting future projects to the ESR, and 58% (95% CI: 37 to 77%) felt that it had influenced the design of their research project. The ESR panel most commonly identified issues of harms to minority groups, inclusion of diverse stakeholders in the research plan, dual use, and representation in datasets. These principles, paired with possible mitigation strategies, offer scaffolding for future research designs.

The role of non–COVID-specific and COVID-specific factors in predicting a shift in willingness to vaccinate: A panel study

PNAS – Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States
December 28, 2021; vol. 118 no. 52
https://www.pnas.org/content/118/52

 

Open Access
The role of non–COVID-specific and COVID-specific factors in predicting a shift in willingness to vaccinate: A panel study
Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Daniel Romer, Patrick E. Jamieson, Kenneth M. Winneg, and Josh Pasek
PNAS December 28, 2021 118 (52) e2112266118; https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2112266118

Strengthening scientific integrity

Science
Volume 375| Issue 6578| 21 Jan 2022
https://www.science.org/toc/science/current

 

Editorial
Strengthening scientific integrity
Download PDF
BY Alondra Nelson, Jane Lubchenco
11 Jan 2022: 247-24
A robust democracy requires a common well-spring of reliable information. During his first days in office, US President Biden affirmed that evidence-based decision-making—informed by vigorous science and unimpeded by political interference—would be a pillar of his administration. He directed ambitious actions to implement that goal, including the creation of an interagency Scientific Integrity Task Force, which has just released the first-ever, comprehensive assessment of scientific integrity policy and practices in the US government.

The task force included 48 scientists, statisticians, engineers, lawyers, and policy-makers with a diversity of experiences from 29 federal agencies, and it received input from hundreds of outside experts from academia, the nonprofit sector, industry, and the public. The group found that although federal agency science is generally sound—that is, reported violations of scientific integrity policies are small in number compared to the magnitude of the federal scientific enterprise—there have been lapses that could undermine public trust in science and jeopardize federal scientists’ and technologists’ morale and motivation to innovate.

For example, during Hurricane Dorian’s approach in 2019, then US President Trump tweeted information contradicting the official forecast of scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Senior political leadership then directed NOAA to issue a press release supporting the president’s inaccurate forecast, in effect manipulating scientific information, jeopardizing public safety, and undermining public confidence in government. In another instance, the Trump administration added a citizenship question to the 2020 census, overruling Census Bureau scientists who cited clear evidence that doing so would depress the response rate and could jeopardize census quality.

These and other violations informed the task force’s recommendations, including the importance of best practices that continually reinforce a culture of integrity across the government. The report recommends the creation of a permanent interagency Scientific Integrity Council to facilitate dissemination and uptake of best practices, and communication training for scientists so that they can be more effective in explaining results to their policy superiors, to the media, and to the public. It also emphasizes the importance of meaningful and appropriate consequences for violations.

In 2009, under US President Obama, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) identified six principles of scientific integrity: science and technology positions in the executive branch should be filled by candidates with appropriate experience; agencies should have rules to ensure the integrity of their scientific process; research that informs agency decisions should be subject to peer review; barring restrictions, scientific or technological findings that inform policy decisions should be available to the public; agencies should address instances in which the integrity of scientific and technological processes and information may be compromised; and agencies should adopt procedures that ensure the integrity of scientific and technological processes and information used to inform decision-making.

Drawing on the 2021 task force report, the OSTP now proposes five additional principles. Because science benefits from dissent within the scientific community to sharpen ideas and thinking, scientists’ ability to freely voice legitimate disagreement should not be constrained. Another principle is that scientific integrity policies should apply to all federal agencies and departments engaged in the production, analysis, use, and communication of evidence, science, and technology. Moreover, these policies must apply to political appointees, career employees, and contractors. A further principle is grounded in the knowledge that science needs to be understood and actively considered during decision-making. Therefore, scientists should routinely participate actively in policy-making. Also, to promote accountability to the American public, federal scientists should be able to speak freely about their unclassified research, including to the press. And, accountability must be upheld. Violations of scientific integrity policies should be taken seriously and considered comparable to violations of government ethics rules.

In phase two, OSTP will work to implement these best practices and make the new principles operational. Every day, federal scientists and technologists help to tackle the greatest challenges that society faces. Let’s make sure that this crucial work is supported and protected.

How privacy’s past may shape its future

Science
Volume 375| Issue 6578| 21 Jan 2022
https://www.science.org/toc/science/current

 

Policy Forum
How privacy’s past may shape its future
BY Alessandro Acquisti, Laura Brandimarte, Jeff Hancock
20 Jan 2022: 270-272
An account of privacy’s evolutionary roots may hold lessons for policies in the digital age
Abstract
Continued expansion of human activities into digital realms gives rise to concerns about digital privacy and its invasions, often expressed in terms of data rights and internet surveillance. It may thus be tempting to construe privacy as a modern phenomenon—something our ancestors lacked and technological innovation and urban growth made possible. Research from history, anthropology, and ethnography suggests otherwise. The evidence for peoples seeking to manage the boundaries of private and public spans time and space, social class, and degree of technological sophistication. Privacy—not merely hiding of data, but the selective opening and closing of the self to others—appears to be both culturally specific and culturally universal (1). But what could explain the simultaneous universality and diversity of a human drive for privacy? An account of the evolutionary roots of privacy may offer an answer and teach us about privacy’s digital future and how to manage it (2).

SARS-CoV-2 vaccine protection and deaths among US veterans during 2021

Science
Volume 375| Issue 6578| 21 Jan 2022
https://www.science.org/toc/science/current

 

Reports
SARS-CoV-2 vaccine protection and deaths among US veterans during 2021
BY
Barbara A. Cohn, Piera M. Cirillo, Caitlin C. Murphy, Nickilou Y. Krigbaum, Arthur W. Wallace
04 Nov 2021: 331-336
Open Access
Vaccine protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection declined through August 2021 as the Delta variant emerged in the United States. We report severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine effectiveness against infection (VE-I) and death (VE-D) by vaccine type in 780,225 veterans in the Veterans Health Administration, covering 2.7% of the US population.

A phase 2a clinical trial of molnupiravir in patients with COVID-19 shows accelerated SARS-CoV-2 RNA clearance and elimination of infectious virus

Science Translational Medicine
Volume 14| Issue 628| 19 Jan 2022
https://www.science.org/toc/stm/current

 

Research Articles
A phase 2a clinical trial of molnupiravir in patients with COVID-19 shows accelerated SARS-CoV-2 RNA clearance and elimination of infectious virus
BY William A. Fischer II, et al.
19 Jan 2022
Open Access
Molnupiravir (800-mg dose) accelerated SARS-CoV-2 RNA clearance in patients with COVID-19 compared to placebo.

What drives beliefs in COVID-19 conspiracy theories? The role of psychotic-like experiences and confinement-related factors

Social Science & Medicine
Volume 292 January 2022
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/social-science-and-medicine/vol/292/suppl/C

 

Research article Full text access
What drives beliefs in COVID-19 conspiracy theories? The role of psychotic-like experiences and confinement-related factors
Simão Ferreira, Carlos Campos, Beatriz Marinho, Susana Rocha, … Nuno Barbosa Rocha
Article 114611

“Please, you go first!” preferences for a COVID-19 vaccine among adults in the Netherlands

Social Science & Medicine
Volume 292 January 2022
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/social-science-and-medicine/vol/292/suppl/C

 

Research article Open access
“Please, you go first!” preferences for a COVID-19 vaccine among adults in the Netherlands
Niek Mouter, Annamarie de Ruijter, G. Ardine de Wit, Mattijs S Lambooij, … Roselinde Kessels
Article 114626

Machine learning reduced workload for the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register: development and evaluation of the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Classifier

Systematic Reviews
https://systematicreviewsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles
[Accessed 22 Jan 2022]

 

Machine learning reduced workload for the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register: development and evaluation of the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Classifier
This study developed, calibrated and evaluated a machine learning (ML) classifier designed to reduce study identification workload in maintaining the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register (CCSR), a continuously upd…
Authors: Ian Shemilt, Anna Noel-Storr, James Thomas, Robin Featherstone and Chris Mavergames
Citation: Systematic Reviews 2022 11:15
Content type: Methodology
Published on: 22 January 2022

A plea for an experimental philosophy of medicine

Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics
Volume 42, issue 3-4, August 2021
https://link.springer.com/journal/11017/volumes-and-issues/42-3

 

Special Issue: A plea for an experimental philosophy of medicine
Editorial Notes
A plea for an experimental philosophy of medicine
Andreas De Block & Kristien Hens
This special issue aims to explore and investigate a new subfield, namely experimental philosophy of medicine. Whereas experimental philosophy is relatively new on the philosophical block, some of its takes and findings have already shaped central debates in ethics, philosophy of action, philosophy of language, and epistemology. Interestingly, the approach of this program was for a long time almost wholly ignored within bioethics and philosophy of medicine—although this seems to have changed somewhat recently. In this introduction, we briefly sketch the program of experimental philosophy and how it can be used to shed philosophical light on issues in the philosophy of medicine.

Differentiating COVID-19 and dengue from other febrile illnesses in co-epidemics: Development and internal validation of COVIDENGUE scores

Travel Medicine and Infectious Diseases
Volume 45 January–February 2022
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/travel-medicine-and-infectious-disease/vol/45/suppl/C

 

Research article Open access
Differentiating COVID-19 and dengue from other febrile illnesses in co-epidemics: Development and internal validation of COVIDENGUE scores
Patrick Gérardin, Olivier Maillard, Léa Bruneau, Frédéric Accot, … Cécile Levin
Article 102232

Attitudes, practices, and obstacles towards influenza vaccination for international travelers among travel health advisors in Germany: A questionnaire-based survey

Travel Medicine and Infectious Diseases
Volume 45 January–February 2022
https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/travel-medicine-and-infectious-disease/vol/45/suppl/C

 

Research article Open access
Attitudes, practices, and obstacles towards influenza vaccination for international travelers among travel health advisors in Germany: A questionnaire-based survey
Thomas Theo Brehm, Sabine Jordan, Marylyn M. Addo, Michael Ramharter, Benno Kreuels
Article 102233

Adolescent Health Series: Engagement with young people as partners in health research: Four case studies from Sub-Saharan Africa

Tropical Medicine & International Health
Volume 27, Issue 1 Pages: i-iv, 1-119 January 2022
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/13653156/current

 

SERIES ON ADOLESCENT HEALTH
Free Access
Adolescent Health Series: Engagement with young people as partners in health research: Four case studies from Sub-Saharan Africa
Aoife M. Doyle, Chido Dziva Chikwari, Nomathamsanqa Majozi, Musonda Simwinga, Gracious R. Mayingire, Kelvin Simbeye, Stefanie Dringus, Sarah Bernays
Pages: 2-12
First Published: 03 December 2021
Existing health services for young people (YP)(10–24 years), which are predominantly designed for but not with young people, often do not meet YP’s needs. The 2018 Global Consensus Statement on meaningful adolescent and youth engagement affirms that YP have a fundamental right to actively and meaningfully engage in all matters that affect their lives. We present four case studies from three countries in sub-Saharan Africa as practical examples of the engagement of young people as partners in health research. We critically reflect on best practices to inform and guide the increasing adoption of collaborative approaches.